10 books like The Last Word on Power

By Tracy Goss,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like The Last Word on Power. Shepherd is a community of 7,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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The Art of Possibility

By Rosamund Stone Zander, Benjamin Zander,

Book cover of The Art of Possibility: Transforming Professional and Personal Life

Perception is not reality. Neuroscience has clearly shown that our human brains are subject to plenty of self-sabotaging patterns. The practices in this book form a powerful framework that enables the reader to imagine and create possibilities that initially seem highly unlikely or even impossible. The wisdom in this book encourages people to reject being “realistic”, ignite hope, and pursue dreams and goals that inspire and spark our passion. As our courage to dream big grows, so does our capacity to achieve those dreams together.

The Art of Possibility

By Rosamund Stone Zander, Benjamin Zander,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Art of Possibility as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Presenting twelve breakthrough practices for bringing creativity into all human endeavors, The Art of Possibility is the dynamic product of an extraordinary partnership. The Art of Possibility combines Benjamin Zander's experience as conductor of the Boston Philharmonic and his talent as a teacher and communicator with psychotherapist Rosamund Stone Zander's genius for designing innovative paradigms for personal and professional fulfillment.
The authors' harmoniously interwoven perspectives provide a deep sense of the powerful role that the notion of possibility can play in every aspect of life. Through uplifting stories, parables, and personal anecdotes, the Zanders invite us to become passionate communicators,…


The User Illusion

By Tor Norretranders,

Book cover of The User Illusion: Cutting Consciousness Down to Size

Our brains take in around 10 million bits a second, but only about 30 of those are raised to conscious awareness. Which 30? How does our brain choose? And how do we make decisions? After a lifetime of thinking I was a conscious being making logical, rational choices, I realize that I’m like a rider on a horse. My conscious mind thinks that I’m controlling the horse, but – after reading this book – now I realize that most of the time the horse is in charge! Knowing that has helped me replace self-limiting practices with more effective ways to working with my instincts and senses.

The User Illusion

By Tor Norretranders,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The User Illusion as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

As John Casti wrote, "Finally, a book that really does explain consciousness." This groundbreaking work by Denmark's leading science writer draws on psychology, evolutionary biology, information theory, and other disciplines to argue its revolutionary point: that consciousness represents only an infinitesimal fraction of our ability to process information. Although we are unaware of it, our brains sift through and discard billions of pieces of data in order to allow us to understand the world around us. In fact, most of what we call thought is actually the unconscious discarding of information. What our consciousness rejects constitutes the most valuable part…


Creative Visualization

By Shakti Gawain,

Book cover of Creative Visualization: Use the Power of Your Imagination to Create What You Want in Your Life

Creative Visualization never mentions the word Witchcraft and yet the principles that this book’s teaching puts forth serve as the basis of my Mental Magick education. I added this book to my recommended reading list in my first book in 2000, because it teaches in a calm, straightforward practice how to develop an inner seeing. Creative Visualization demonstrates several methods of how to transform ideas and desires into mental images. You cannot do magick without the ability to envision the outcome of your spellwork. This book is the quintessential guide to accessing creativity and a life of your choosing through the power of visualization.

Creative Visualization

By Shakti Gawain,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Creative Visualization as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

As introduced by Shakti Gawain to more than seven million readers worldwide, creative visualization is the art of using mental imagery and affirmation to produce positive changes in your life. Gawain’s clear writing style and vivid examples make Creative Visualization easy to read and apply to your personal needs and wants. This groundbreaking work has found enthusiastic followers in every country and language in which it has been published, and Gawain’s simple yet powerful techniques are now used successfully in many diverse fields, including health, education, business, sports, and the creative arts. Whether you read it for general inspiration and…


Wishcraft

By Barbara Sher, Annie Gottlieb,

Book cover of Wishcraft: How to Get What You Really Want

A dream is just a dream until you write it down – then it becomes a plan. This book provides practical approaches to turning dreams into goals and plans. With strategies as simple as charting your progress and setting accountability checkpoints with a buddy, the “impossible” gradually becomes possible, and eventually becomes inevitable. Sure, you may lurch fitfully in the direction of your dreams and goals, but the advice in this book will ensure that any setbacks are temporary, and progress is tangible and a source of hope, inspiration, and motivation.

Wishcraft

By Barbara Sher, Annie Gottlieb,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Wishcraft as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Cindy Fox was a waitress. Now she’s a pilot. Peter Johnson was a truck driver. Now he’s a dairy farmer. Tina Forbes was a struggling artist. Now she’s a successful one. Alan Rizzo was an editor. Now he’s a bookstore owner.

What they have in common—and what you can share—are Barbara Sher’s effective strategies for making real changes in your life. This human, practical program puts your vague yearnings and dreams to work for you—with concrete results. You’ll learn how to

• Discover your strengths and skills
• Turn your fears and negative feelings into positive tools
• Diagram the…


The Relational Teacher

By Robert Loe (editor),

Book cover of The Relational Teacher

As in other areas of modern life, the role of relationships in education has been considered of minor consequence. However, the Relational Schools Foundation in the UK has found, after years of research, that a focus on improving the quality of relationships in schools improves a broad range of educational and social outcomes and can overcome disadvantages as well. The book the Foundation has published, The Relational Teacher and the accompanying film, begins with some framing by social scientists, but the body of the book consists of six case studies and the insightful reflections of the teacher involved with each study. The relational dynamics in a classroom—particularly the motivational relationship created by the teacher—are closely related to a student’s effort in learning and developing. 

The Relational Teacher

By Robert Loe (editor),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Relational Teacher as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Relational Schools works to put relationships at the core of school life, on the principle that supportive relationships between all members of a school are pivotal. Strong, secure, relationships can, they say, surmount social inequality. Weak or fragile relationships reinforce educational disadvantage. It is only in a secure relationships that the most difficult learning can take place and such relationships can have a powerful and positive influence on children’s wellbeing, mental health and academic progress.

What’s shocking is how far we have allowed our focus to move from these basic premises. This book, and the film that accompanies it, focus…


Resonate

By Nancy Duarte,

Book cover of Resonate: Present Visual Stories That Transform Audiences

Read all of Duarte’s books, but start with this one. Communication is more than simply words. Visuals are often essential to conveying an effective and memorable message, and Resonate offers practical strategies to do this well. Duarte is viewed as the best of the best, and it’s no hyperbole. As a person who struggles with the visual realm, Duarte’s clear and concise strategies transformed my presentations significantly, Read this then everything else she has written. 

Resonate

By Nancy Duarte,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Resonate as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Reveals the underlying story form of all great presentations that will not only create impact, but will move people to action Presentations are meant to inform, inspire, and persuade audiences. So why then do so many audiences leave feeling like they've wasted their time? All too often, presentations don't resonate with the audience and move them to transformative action. Just as the author's first book helped presenters become visual communicators, Resonate helps you make a strong connection with your audience and lead them to purposeful action. The author's approach is simple: building a presentation today is a bit like writing…


The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology

By Chris Chambers,

Book cover of The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology: A Manifesto for Reforming the Culture of Scientific Practice

Still the best book to diagnose the problems and explain why we need Open Science. Chris Chambers tells of his disillusionment with so many aspects of what researchers were doing, in psychology, but also in medicine and many other fields. That rang true to me—I travelled that same road. He goes on from explaining the problems to describing solutions. Many of these, including openness, better statistics, replication, and increased scrutiny, are now being advocated or required by funders and journal editors, and adopted by researchers. That’s Open Science, hooray!

The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology

By Chris Chambers,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Why psychology is in peril as a scientific discipline-and how to save it

Psychological science has made extraordinary discoveries about the human mind, but can we trust everything its practitioners are telling us? In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that a lot of research in psychology is based on weak evidence, questionable practices, and sometimes even fraud. The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology diagnoses the ills besetting the discipline today and proposes sensible, practical solutions to ensure that it remains a legitimate and reliable science in the years ahead. In this unflinchingly candid manifesto, Chris Chambers shows how…


What Is Global History?

By Sebastian Conrad,

Book cover of What Is Global History?

So, what, exactly is this ‘world’ or ‘global history’? Authors slap the two words on their books, universities offer new courses in it, and government officials across the planet now speak of ‘global this’ and ‘global that’. One could be forgiven for throwing up one’s hands in exasperation for failing to understand what exactly these two words mean. That is until Sebastian Conrad published this gem of a book aptly entitled: What is Global History? Yes, it’s a bit academic, but it’s also clearly written, logically organized, and succeeds brilliantly in explaining what global history is and is not without losing the reader in theoretical jargon. If you want to try something beyond the ‘nation’ and ‘empire’, Conrad’s global history is a great place to start.

What Is Global History?

By Sebastian Conrad,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked What Is Global History? as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Until very recently, historians have looked at the past with the tools of the nineteenth century. But globalization has fundamentally altered our ways of knowing, and it is no longer possible to study nations in isolation or to understand world history as emanating from the West. This book reveals why the discipline of global history has emerged as the most dynamic and innovative field in history--one that takes the connectedness of the world as its point of departure, and that poses a fundamental challenge to the premises and methods of history as we know it. What Is Global History? provides…


The Knowledge Machine

By Michael Strevens,

Book cover of The Knowledge Machine: How Irrationality Created Modern Science

Science has revolutionized the way we live and the way we understand reality, but what accounts for its success? What method sets science apart from other forms of inquiry and ensures that it yields ever-more accurate theories of the world? Strevens argues that the scientific method is not a special kind of logic, like deriving hypotheses from first principles or narrowing hypotheses through falsification, but a simple commitment to arguing with evidence. Strevens shows, with historical case studies, how this commitment is seemingly irrational, as it provides no constraints on what counts as evidence or how evidence should be interpreted, but also incredibly powerful, fostering ingenuity and discovery.

The Knowledge Machine

By Michael Strevens,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Knowledge Machine as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

* Why is science so powerful?
* Why did it take so long-two thousand years after the invention of philosophy and mathematics-for the human race to start using science to learn the secrets of the universe?

In a groundbreaking work that blends science, philosophy, and history, leading philosopher of science Michael Strevens answers these challenging questions, showing how science came about only once thinkers stumbled upon the astonishing idea that scientific breakthroughs could be accomplished by breaking the rules of logical argument.

Like such classic works as Karl Popper's The Logic of Scientific Discovery and Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of…


Epistemological Problems of Economics. Ludwig Von Mises

By Ludwig von Mises,

Book cover of Epistemological Problems of Economics. Ludwig Von Mises

This book written in 1922 by the Austrian economist at the University of Vienna is one of the few truly foundational works in political economy. Mises takes apart the theory of the Marxist moneyless planned economy which Lenin and then Stalin tried to apply to the Soviet Union. Mises lucidly explains why not only that it could never work but would lead to catastrophic and unending shortages, dictatorship, repression, and arbitrary rule enforced by a militarized one-party state. Although Mises had no knowledge of China, it is the best book to read in order to understand what happened in China in the 20th century.

Epistemological Problems of Economics. Ludwig Von Mises

By Ludwig von Mises,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Epistemological Problems of Economics. Ludwig Von Mises as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

First published in German in 1933 and in English in 1960, Epistemological Problems of Economics presents Ludwig von Mises’s views on the logical and epistemological features of social interpretation as well as his argument that the Austrian theory of value is the core element of a general theory of human behavior that transcends traditional limitations of economic science.

This volume is unique among Mises’s works in that it contains a collection of essays in which he contested the theories of intellectuals he respected such as Carl Menger, Eugen von Böhm-Bawerk, and Max Weber. Mises describes how value theory applies to…


5 book lists we think you will like!

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