10 books like Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke And Other Misfortunes

By Eric LaRocca,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke And Other Misfortunes. Shepherd is a community of 6,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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My Favorite Thing Is Monsters

By Emil Ferris,

Book cover of My Favorite Thing Is Monsters

My Favorite Thing Is Monsters is described as a graphic novel, but it takes the form of the notebook of a 10-year-old girl who is obsessed with monsters. The art is terrific and the story is haunting and mysterious. I’ve always been a notebook person myself, filling up stacks of sketchbooks through my childhood and teens, so the way the main character processed her life by scribbling on a page really resonated with me. This book is super unique, from the way the character always draws herself as a werewolf, to the mysterious death of her upstairs neighbor, and the way she remembers conversations by drawing them as comics.

My Favorite Thing Is Monsters

By Emil Ferris,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked My Favorite Thing Is Monsters as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Camp Ghoul Mountain Part VI

By Jonathan Raab, Benjamin Holesapple (editor),

Book cover of Camp Ghoul Mountain Part VI: The Official Novelization

This book is absolutely wild. It purports to be an adaption of an over-the-top gorefest of a movie, plagued by conspiracy theories. Full of footnotes and behind-the-scenes anecdotes and autobiographical details about how the book itself came to be, it not only supposedly adapts a film but tells a far darker hidden story and is overall a lot of dark and spooky fun.

Camp Ghoul Mountain Part VI

By Jonathan Raab, Benjamin Holesapple (editor),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Camp Ghoul Mountain Part VI as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The West Wing

By Edward Gorey,

Book cover of The West Wing

Edward Gorey is a forever favorite of mine, a pen and ink artist popular for the dozens of strange and macabre little books he created. The West Wing is unique in that it has no words at all, and the story is told entirely through his meticulous pen and ink images. Without a plot, or even any characters, there is only mood and vibes, and they are spooky and mysterious. Each page shows a different part of The West Wing and its seemingly endless rooms with their hints of ghosts and the feeling that someone has just left, or that something horrible has just happened. It’s my favorite haunted house story of all time.

The West Wing

By Edward Gorey,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The West Wing as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Griffin & Sabine

By Nick Bantock,

Book cover of Griffin & Sabine

These books are just beautiful. I picked them up on sale as a teenager and poured over them over and over. The story is told in the form of letters, postcards, and art sent between two artists. The story is lonely and mysterious, leaving you with more questions than answers. You actually get to open the envelopes and pull out the letters inside as you read. Nick Bantock’s art style is really inspiring.

Griffin & Sabine

By Nick Bantock,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Griffin & Sabine as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


After the People Lights Have Gone Off

By Stephen Graham Jones,

Book cover of After the People Lights Have Gone Off

SGJ has such a unique voice, it’s hard to deny this collection its props. Here you have a wide range of themes and unique characterization, and I think there’s a lot to be learned from a collection such as this. Dialogue, character building, tension; this is like a guide to writing good fiction.

After the People Lights Have Gone Off

By Stephen Graham Jones,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked After the People Lights Have Gone Off as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Winner, Best Collection of the Year, This Is Horror

Nominated, Best Collection of the Year, Bram Stoker Awards

Nominated, Best Collection of the Year, Shirley Jackson Awards

The 15 stories in After the People Lights Have Gone Off, by Stephen Graham Jones, explore the horrors and fears of the supernatural and the everyday. Included are two original stories, several rarities and out-of-print narratives, as well as a few "best of the year" inclusions. 

In "Thirteen", horrors lurk behind the flickering images on the big screen. "Welcome to the Reptile House" reveals the secrets that hide in our flesh. In "The…


Our Trespasses

By Michael Cordell,

Book cover of Our Trespasses: A Paranormal Thriller

There are many negatives about this book that told me to stay away. For me, the subject that deserved to be highlighted is forgiveness. The way the author weaved it into this story was perfect. The topic does not fit with the genre, and though paranormal and suspenseful, forgiveness ties it over for me.

Our Trespasses’ negative was the paranormal side of the book. I’m not a big fan of the genre but once my interest was piqued, I really enjoyed the book. In the end, it wasn’t that big negative, but it made me hesitant to read at first.

Our Trespasses

By Michael Cordell,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Our Trespasses as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The Only Good Indians

By Stephen Graham Jones,

Book cover of The Only Good Indians

This novel reminded me of just how brilliant the horror genre can be, and how deeply a book can wound, no matter how much we have read or how jaded we think we have become. Jones is a master at evoking not only visceral but achingly genuine emotional reactions in his readers, and there are scenes in The Only Good Indians that I will never be able to forget. Unflinching, sharply written and laced with unexpected black humour, this is super-smart horror fiction that takes no shortcuts and resists the cheap and easy shot. There’s good reason it’s won so many awards, including the World Fantasy and Shirley Jackson, and I am absolutely on board for anything and everything that Jones writes in the future. 

The Only Good Indians

By Stephen Graham Jones,

Why should I read it?

3 authors picked The Only Good Indians as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

"Thrilling, literate, scary, immersive."
-Stephen King

The Stoker, Mark Twain American Voice in Literature, Bradbury, Locus and Alex Award-winning, NYT-bestselling gothic horror about cultural identity, the price of tradition and revenge for fans of Adam Nevill's The Ritual.

Ricky, Gabe, Lewis and Cassidy are men bound to their heritage, bound by society, and trapped in the endless expanses of the landscape. Now, ten years after a fateful elk hunt, which remains a closely guarded secret between them, these men - and their children - must face a ferocious spirit that is coming for them, one at a time. A spirit…

Burnt Offerings

By Robert Marasco, Stephen Graham Jones,

Book cover of Burnt Offerings

This book isn’t nearly as well known as the others except to real aficionados of the genre. But it’s one of the scariest evil house novels ever written, in part because of the surprising twist at the end. A young couple decides to get out of the city for the summer and rent a house in upstate New York. Right away, there’s something odd: an elderly woman lives in the house, and she stays locked in her room all the time. As the days go by, it becomes obvious that something weird and terrifying is happening in the house, and there’s a reason the couple got it for such a cheap price. And by the time they discover the truth, it might be too late.

Burnt Offerings

By Robert Marasco, Stephen Graham Jones,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Burnt Offerings as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Censoring an Iranian Love Story

By Sara Khalili, Shahriar Mandanipour,

Book cover of Censoring an Iranian Love Story

Against the backdrop of an unlucky courtship between two young students in today’s Tehran, this entertaining novel uses humour to ridicule the myopic mentality of contemporary Iran’s religious leadership that wishes to see itself as cultured and intellectual.

Censoring an Iranian Love Story

By Sara Khalili, Shahriar Mandanipour,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Censoring an Iranian Love Story as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Truly original, Censoring an Iranian Love Story is an incredibly imaginative yet always charming love story set in contemporary Iran that crackles with wit, verve and social comment: Sara falls in love with Dara through secret messages hidden in code in the pages of books that have been outlawed, but then something quite extraordinary and unexpected happens. Through adeptly handled asides to the reader, as well as anecdotes, codes and metaphors, and cheeky references to the wonderfully rich Iranian literary heritage, the novel builds to offer a revealing yet often playful and hopeful comment on the pressures of writing within…

XX

By Rian Hughes,

Book cover of XX

A hugely ambitious mix of text and graphic design, in which typography is used in bold and disarming ways. It is also a genuinely compelling sci-fi novel about very, very, big ideas. Filled with meta-narratives, in-jokes, artistic references, and mixed media, it’s an interesting alternative to that other oft-cited cult classic House of Leaves. As someone who has worked as both designer and editor, I was blown away by Hughes’s ability to combine a good story with such avant-garde design. The themes communicated will give you much to contemplate – or ramble on about to any friends you successfully corner. A staggering achievement destined to be a future cult classic.

XX

By Rian Hughes,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked XX as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A boundary pushing, extremely inventive sci-? epic of ?rst contact by world-renowned graphic designer and comics creator Rian Hughes

When a signal of extraterrestrial origin is intercepted by one of Earth s most powerful radio satellites, people worldwide, including a small team of tech outsiders at a software engineering ?rm specializing in arti?cial intelligence, race to interpret the message carried by what could be the ?rst communication from an intergalactic civilization. Has humanity made ?rst contact? Is the signal itself an alien life-form? A threat? If so, how will the people of Earth respond?

Supplemented by redacted NASA reports, magazine…

5 book lists we think you will like!

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