10 books like My Favorite Thing Is Monsters

By Emil Ferris,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like My Favorite Thing Is Monsters. Shepherd is a community of 6,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Beautiful Darkness

By Kerascoët, Fabien Vehlmann,

Book cover of Beautiful Darkness

An incredibly haunting book. At first glance it looks like a fairy tale for children but after only a few pages in you realise it is quite a sinister tale and something much darker altogether. It is a very brave book I think and I’m not really sure how to categorize it other than it being very, very dark indeed.

Beautiful Darkness

By Kerascoët, Fabien Vehlmann,

Why should I read it?

3 authors picked Beautiful Darkness as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Newly homeless, a group of fairies find themselves trying to adapt to their new life in the forest. As they dodge dangers from both without and within, optimistic Aurora steps forward to organize and help build a new community. Slowly, the world around them becomes more treacherous as petty rivalries and factions form. Beautiful Darkness became a bestseller and an instant classic when it was released in 2014. This paperback edition of the modern horror classic contains added material, preparatory sketches, and unused art. While Kerascoet mix gorgeous watercolors and spritely cartoon characters, Fabien Vehlmann takes the story into bleaker…

Bone

By Jeff Smith,

Book cover of Bone: The Complete Cartoon Epic in One Volume

Bone was the first book I ever read on my own as a 5th grader. For the first time, I didn’t use an audiobook or need a parent/teacher to read it to me. For that alone, I’ve put it at the top of the list. Bone follows the story of three wayward brothers as they each find their way to a fantastical valley filled with mythical dragons, bizarre creatures, and a lost princess. What starts off as this fun and goofy comic, spirals into this adventure of epic proportions as the author-illustrator takes young readers into a world they never imagined before. 

This fast-paced saga helped captivate me from the first page to the last and I personally owe a lot to this book for helping me overcome my dislike for reading as a young person. This book helped me on my journey to becoming a reader and it…

Bone

By Jeff Smith,

Why should I read it?

3 authors picked Bone as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


My Friend Dahmer

By Derf Backderf,

Book cover of My Friend Dahmer

An amazing personal tale of someone who went to high school with, what was to become, infamous serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer. What makes it so good, in my opinion, is, that it doesn’t become sensationalist in any way. It clearly shows how a vulnerable, very disturbed child could fall through the cracks in 70’s America. It is drawn in a cartoony style, which helps to create a distance from the reader to the incredibly dark and sad subject matter. It works amazingly well as it is told from the perspective of Dahmer’s classmates. Well recommended!

My Friend Dahmer

By Derf Backderf,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked My Friend Dahmer as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

My Friend Dahmer is the hauntingly original graphic novel by Derf Backderf, the award winning political cartoonist. In these pages, Backderf tries to make sense of Jeffery Dahmer, the future serial killer with whom he shared classrooms, hallways, libraries and car rides. What emerges is a surprisingly sympathetic portrait of a young man struggling helplessly against the urges, some ghastly, bubbling up from the deep recesses of his psyche. The Dahmer recounted here, although universally regarded as an inhumane monster, is a lonely oddball who, in reality, is all too human. A shy kid sucked inexorably into madness while the…

X'ed Out

By Charles Burns,

Book cover of X'ed Out

I personally read everything Burns makes. He is one of my all-time favourite graphic novelists and I’m heavily inspired by his work. This penultimate work of his has again that sense of otherwordly weirdness to it that he does so well. I just adore the tight line work and moody nightmarish sequences he does. Painting a tale here that raises questions that only get answered when the entire trilogy is completed. Mind-bogglingly well-constructed and strange but very good.

X'ed Out

By Charles Burns,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked X'ed Out as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Meet Doug, aspiring young artist. He's having a strange night. A weird buzzing noise on the other side of the wall has woken him up, and there across the room, next to a huge hole torn out of the bricks, sits his beloved cat Inky. Who died years ago. But that's no longer the case, as he slinks through the hole, beckoning Doug to follow. So he does. Now there's no turning back. What the heck is going on? To say much more would spoil the creepy, Burnsian fun, especially since - unlike Black Hole - X'ed Out has not…


Camp Ghoul Mountain Part VI

By Jonathan Raab, Benjamin Holesapple (editor),

Book cover of Camp Ghoul Mountain Part VI: The Official Novelization

This book is absolutely wild. It purports to be an adaption of an over-the-top gorefest of a movie, plagued by conspiracy theories. Full of footnotes and behind-the-scenes anecdotes and autobiographical details about how the book itself came to be, it not only supposedly adapts a film but tells a far darker hidden story and is overall a lot of dark and spooky fun.

Camp Ghoul Mountain Part VI

By Jonathan Raab, Benjamin Holesapple (editor),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Camp Ghoul Mountain Part VI as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The West Wing

By Edward Gorey,

Book cover of The West Wing

Edward Gorey is a forever favorite of mine, a pen and ink artist popular for the dozens of strange and macabre little books he created. The West Wing is unique in that it has no words at all, and the story is told entirely through his meticulous pen and ink images. Without a plot, or even any characters, there is only mood and vibes, and they are spooky and mysterious. Each page shows a different part of The West Wing and its seemingly endless rooms with their hints of ghosts and the feeling that someone has just left, or that something horrible has just happened. It’s my favorite haunted house story of all time.

The West Wing

By Edward Gorey,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The West Wing as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke And Other Misfortunes

By Eric LaRocca,

Book cover of Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke And Other Misfortunes

This is a more modern pick that is very quickly becoming a cult classic. Told entirely through emails and message board postings, it lays out a very dark story of psychological manipulation between two women. I love found footage horror movies, and this book gives you that same feeling of discovering something you aren’t meant to see (or read).

Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke And Other Misfortunes

By Eric LaRocca,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke And Other Misfortunes as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Three dark and disturbing horror stories from an astonishing new voice, including the viral-sensation tale of obsession, Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke. For fans of Kathe Koja, Clive Barker and Stephen Graham Jones. Winner of the Splatterpunk Award for Best Novella.

A whirlpool of darkness churns at the heart of a macabre ballet between two lonely young women in an internet chat room in the early 2000s-a darkness that threatens to forever transform them once they finally succumb to their most horrific desires.

A couple isolate themselves on a remote island in an attempt to recover from…

Griffin & Sabine

By Nick Bantock,

Book cover of Griffin & Sabine

These books are just beautiful. I picked them up on sale as a teenager and poured over them over and over. The story is told in the form of letters, postcards, and art sent between two artists. The story is lonely and mysterious, leaving you with more questions than answers. You actually get to open the envelopes and pull out the letters inside as you read. Nick Bantock’s art style is really inspiring.

Griffin & Sabine

By Nick Bantock,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Griffin & Sabine as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The Philosophy of Horror

By Noël Carroll,

Book cover of The Philosophy of Horror: Or, Paradoxes of the Heart

I have used this book many times in courses on the history of monsters and on monster movies. Carrol is a philosopher, and the book is written with exacting clarity. It is primarily about the genre of horror, but as Carrol writes, “monsters are central to horror.” Therefore, the author sets out both to define the generally indefinable category of “monster” and to analyze how we respond to them when they appear in fictional narratives. If you’ve ever wondered why a werewolf is a monster but Chewbacca isn’t, this is the book to read!

The Philosophy of Horror

By Noël Carroll,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Philosophy of Horror as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Noel Carroll, film scholar and philosopher, offers the first serious look at the aesthetics of horror. In this book he discusses the nature and narrative structures of the genre, dealing with horror as a "transmedia" phenomenon. A fan and serious student of the horror genre, Carroll brings to bear his comprehensive knowledge of obscure and forgotten works, as well as of the horror masterpieces. Working from a philosophical perspective, he tries to account for how people can find pleasure in having their wits scared out of them. What, after all, are those "paradoxes of the heart" that make us want…

The Search for Big Foot

By Peter Byrne,

Book cover of The Search for Big Foot: Monster, Myth or Man?

For me, the ’60s & ’70s were the hay day of Bigfoot research. Along with Coleman, Moorehead, Green, and Dahinden, Peter Byrne was deep in the woods searching for the elusive creature. What I love about Byrne’s, The Search for Big Foot, is the authenticity of his quest. As I turned each page, I felt as if I was sitting by the campfire with Byrne as he shared his thoughts and compelling evidence for the elusive creature.

The Search for Big Foot

By Peter Byrne,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Search for Big Foot as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


5 book lists we think you will like!

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