10 books like Camp Ghoul Mountain Part VI

By Jonathan Raab, Benjamin Holesapple (editor),

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like Camp Ghoul Mountain Part VI. Shepherd is a community of 6,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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My Favorite Thing Is Monsters

By Emil Ferris,

Book cover of My Favorite Thing Is Monsters

My Favorite Thing Is Monsters is described as a graphic novel, but it takes the form of the notebook of a 10-year-old girl who is obsessed with monsters. The art is terrific and the story is haunting and mysterious. I’ve always been a notebook person myself, filling up stacks of sketchbooks through my childhood and teens, so the way the main character processed her life by scribbling on a page really resonated with me. This book is super unique, from the way the character always draws herself as a werewolf, to the mysterious death of her upstairs neighbor, and the way she remembers conversations by drawing them as comics.

My Favorite Thing Is Monsters

By Emil Ferris,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked My Favorite Thing Is Monsters as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The West Wing

By Edward Gorey,

Book cover of The West Wing

Edward Gorey is a forever favorite of mine, a pen and ink artist popular for the dozens of strange and macabre little books he created. The West Wing is unique in that it has no words at all, and the story is told entirely through his meticulous pen and ink images. Without a plot, or even any characters, there is only mood and vibes, and they are spooky and mysterious. Each page shows a different part of The West Wing and its seemingly endless rooms with their hints of ghosts and the feeling that someone has just left, or that something horrible has just happened. It’s my favorite haunted house story of all time.

The West Wing

By Edward Gorey,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The West Wing as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke And Other Misfortunes

By Eric LaRocca,

Book cover of Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke And Other Misfortunes

This is a more modern pick that is very quickly becoming a cult classic. Told entirely through emails and message board postings, it lays out a very dark story of psychological manipulation between two women. I love found footage horror movies, and this book gives you that same feeling of discovering something you aren’t meant to see (or read).

Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke And Other Misfortunes

By Eric LaRocca,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke And Other Misfortunes as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Three dark and disturbing horror stories from an astonishing new voice, including the viral-sensation tale of obsession, Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke. For fans of Kathe Koja, Clive Barker and Stephen Graham Jones. Winner of the Splatterpunk Award for Best Novella.

A whirlpool of darkness churns at the heart of a macabre ballet between two lonely young women in an internet chat room in the early 2000s-a darkness that threatens to forever transform them once they finally succumb to their most horrific desires.

A couple isolate themselves on a remote island in an attempt to recover from…

Griffin & Sabine

By Nick Bantock,

Book cover of Griffin & Sabine

These books are just beautiful. I picked them up on sale as a teenager and poured over them over and over. The story is told in the form of letters, postcards, and art sent between two artists. The story is lonely and mysterious, leaving you with more questions than answers. You actually get to open the envelopes and pull out the letters inside as you read. Nick Bantock’s art style is really inspiring.

Griffin & Sabine

By Nick Bantock,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Griffin & Sabine as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


A Lot of People Are Saying

By Nancy L. Rosenblum, Russell Muirhead,

Book cover of A Lot of People Are Saying: The New Conspiracism and the Assault on Democracy

Extremist movements today are not just driven by violent hate and ideologies—they are also deeply embedded in a wide range of conspiracy theories. Muirhead and Rosenblum’s book helped me understand how those conspiracy theories spread and why they are so dangerous to democracies around the world—especially for the ways they disorient individuals, delegitimize expertise, and carry antisemitic and Islamophobic ideas into the mainstream.

A Lot of People Are Saying

By Nancy L. Rosenblum, Russell Muirhead,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Lot of People Are Saying as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

How the new conspiracists are undermining democracy-and what can be done about it

Conspiracy theories are as old as politics. But conspiracists today have introduced something new-conspiracy without theory. And the new conspiracism has moved from the fringes to the heart of government with the election of Donald Trump. In A Lot of People Are Saying, Russell Muirhead and Nancy Rosenblum show how the new conspiracism differs from classic conspiracy theory, how it undermines democracy, and what needs to be done to resist it.


Routledge Handbook of Conspiracy Theories

By Michael Butter (editor), Peter Knight (editor),

Book cover of Routledge Handbook of Conspiracy Theories

My book came out around the same time as several others on conspiracy theory from humanities scholars. I could spend all five of my book recommendations on their works—and I’m thinking especially here of books by Clare Birchall, Peter Knight, Timothy Melley, and more recently Michael Butter—but several of the authors are included in this recent collection that also features scholars from throughout Europe. The Routledge Handbook situates conspiracy theories within the political and cultural contexts from which they emerge throughout the world, and it includes in a single volume works from a broad range of disciplines that reveal the diversity and scope of the contemporary academic study of conspiracy theory.

Routledge Handbook of Conspiracy Theories

By Michael Butter (editor), Peter Knight (editor),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Routledge Handbook of Conspiracy Theories as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Taking a global and interdisciplinary approach, the Routledge Handbook of Conspiracy Theories provides a comprehensive overview of conspiracy theories as an important social, cultural and political phenomenon in contemporary life.

This handbook provides the most complete analysis of the phenomenon to date. It analyses conspiracy theories from a variety of perspectives, using both qualitative and quantitative methods. It maps out the key debates, and includes chapters on the historical origins of conspiracy theories, as well as their political significance in a broad range of countries and regions. Other chapters consider the psychology and the sociology of conspiracy beliefs, in addition…


Project Chartreuse

By George Bixley,

Book cover of Project Chartreuse

I’d be afraid to meet this detective, Slater, in a dark alley, as he’s unpredictable and has a quick temper. At the same time I have to admit he’s the kind of guy I’d want to date. Smart and competent in his investigative work, Slater is a mass of contradictions, a textbook sex addict and in complete denial about it, plus he drinks too much. His pugilistic approach to the world evolves through the series, and in this book his slightly warped moral compass has him working to outsmart the cops to track down a violent conspiracy theorist.

Project Chartreuse

By George Bixley,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Project Chartreuse as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Department of Truth, Vol 1

By James Tynion IV,

Book cover of Department of Truth, Vol 1: The End of the World

It’s the post-modern apotheosis of all conspiracy theories: convince enough people something is true, it becomes true. Doesn’t matter how far-fetched – the Earth is flat, the world is overcome with Bigfoots, shape-changing lizardmen are secretly controlling everything – convince enough people, and it happens.  Except, who’s trying to convince people? And who’s trying to stop them? And are either of them on our side? It’s really a bottomless hole in the most enjoyable way (if paranoid fables are your thing): no matter how bad you realize it is, it’s actually worse. But wait, it’s even worse than that. And even worse than that. This is an ongoing comic series (even the art makes reality seem haunted and insubstantial), so while there are already several collected editions, there’s no end in sight.

Department of Truth, Vol 1

By James Tynion IV,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Department of Truth, Vol 1 as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Best of 2021 Lists:
New York Public Library
Entertainment Weekly
Indigo
And more...

"A wonderfully dizzy mixture of Men in Black, John Carpenter, Stephen King, The Matrix, and 1970s conspiracy thrillers."- Forbes

"A story for our zeitgeist. SIMMONDS' art invokes Bill Sienkiewicz."- Entertainment Weekly

"It is FANTASTIC. Can't wait to read the whole series!"- Patton Oswalt

COLE TURNER has studied conspiracy theories all his life, but he isn't prepared for what happens when he discovers that all of them are true, from the JFK Assassination to Flat Earth Theory and Reptilian Shapeshifters. One organization has been covering them up for…

The Illuminatus! Trilogy

By Robert Shea, Robert Anton Williams,

Book cover of The Illuminatus! Trilogy: The Eye in the Pyramid, the Golden Apple, Leviathan

Williams’s trilogy of fantasy novels from the 1970s is both incredibly dated in its retrograde sexual politics and prescient in its depiction of a world gone mad with paranoia and bizarre conspiracies. The trilogy’s confusing plot, sense of humor, and shifting and challenging politics trigger the kinds of bewilderment and excitement that conspiracy theories engender. More fun and intellectually challenging than the rabbit holes that the Internet regularly invites us to climb into, Illuminatus! can force a reader to doubt received history and human perception. Erik Davis’s recent book High Weirdness offers context and biography for Wilson and his work, but the trilogy is best read cold and on a lark for a simulation of what it’s like to be swept into a conspiracy.

The Illuminatus! Trilogy

By Robert Shea, Robert Anton Williams,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Illuminatus! Trilogy as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Dispelling Wetiko

By Paul Levy,

Book cover of Dispelling Wetiko: Breaking the Curse of Evil

As someone who campaigns for a better way to operate spaceship Earth, Dispelling Wetiko was the precise slap in the face I needed to break free from the spell that has captured so many would-be change-makers like myself. It’s so easy to look around and point the finger at those who benefit most from the world’s problems as being the cause agents when nothing could be further from the truth. 

It is our collective hopes, our weaknesses, and our fears – multiplied in their billions – that create the super-structure that billionaires enjoy. Levy defines this as a collective psychosis of humanity that wreaks havoc on the world around us – a psychosis that we must face down before we can hope to defeat it.

Dispelling Wetiko

By Paul Levy,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Dispelling Wetiko as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


5 book lists we think you will like!

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