10 books like The Anubis Gates

By Tim Powers,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like The Anubis Gates. Shepherd is a community of 7,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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A Transatlantic Tunnel, Hurrah!

By Harry Harrison,

Book cover of A Transatlantic Tunnel, Hurrah!

A Transatlantic Tunnel, Hurrah! is an outlier, if you like. I call it ‘proto-Steampunk’ as it was published before the term was coined in the early 1980s. Regardless, it could be a template for Steampunk when it arrived. In some ways, it’s an alternate history, and it has steam-powered contraptions, big engineering projects, a Victorian tone that still incorporates our modern gaze, cameo appearances by real historical figures, and a rip-roaring narrative. Its rollicking diction is uplifting, and it mirrors the gorgeous stiff upper lip tone of much Victorian fiction to heart-warming effect. It plays with the manners, morals, and decorum of the times to create a world that isn’t the nineteenth century as it was, but as it should have been. The edition I have, purchased many years ago, has a foreword by the notoriously curmudgeonly Auberon Waugh where he admits that he ‘cried like a baby at the…

A Transatlantic Tunnel, Hurrah!

By Harry Harrison,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Transatlantic Tunnel, Hurrah! as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

An early classic of steampunk and neo-Victoriana, Harry Harrison’s A Transatlantic Tunnel, Hurrah!

The time is the 1970s―sort of. The place is Earth―in a way. The project: build a tunnel over four thousand miles in length, intended to sustain a pressure of one thousand atmospheres while accommodating cargo and passengers traveling in excess of a thousand miles per hour. The Transatlantic Tunnel will be the greatest engineering feat in the history of the British Empire, a structure worthy of Her Majesty’s Empire in this, the eighth decade of the twentieth century.

If the project is a success, the credit will…


The Difference Engine

By William Gibson, Bruce Sterling,

Book cover of The Difference Engine

1990 saw the release of The Difference Engine when cyberpunk originator William Gibson teamed up with Bruce Sheffield. This book set the Steampunk template for using historical figures, giving the historical events a tweak, and then seeing where the narrative goes. The timeline twist they posit was that in the 1820s, Charles Babbage manages to complete his Difference Engine, the forerunner of modern computers, and thus unleashes a technological revolution in the Victorian era. It’s important for the way it probes the social consequences of this upheaval, particularly the clashes with Victorian sensibilities.

I was a red hot William Gibson fan after reading Neuromancer, the seminal cyberpunk novel and I had a fanboy moment in meeting him at a book signing not long after the release of The Difference Engine, where, quite typically, all the thoughtful and considered comments I’d prepared about his themes and concerns went out…

The Difference Engine

By William Gibson, Bruce Sterling,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Difference Engine as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In 1855, London swelters in a poisonous heatwave. The computer age has arrived a century ahead of time and the Industrial Revolution is in full swing. However, there is a conspiracy afoot, linking Britain with the France of Louis Napoleon and the Manhattan commune of Karl Marx.


The Diamond Age

By Neal Stephenson,

Book cover of The Diamond Age: Or, a Young Lady's Illustrated Primer

As one of the founding fathers of Nanopunk, Neal Stephenson’s writings form a straightforward bridge between Postcyberpunk and Neon Science-Fiction. His novel is a collection of exotic technologies like matter compilers, smart paper, immunity-enhancing particles, and foldable transportable mech-horses. Eventually, I found myself inspired to create exotic tech of my own (e.g. foods, arts, weapons, and technologies fully based on “Dark”, an unconstructed area of “empty space” featured somewhat heavily in my neon sci-fi novel). Stephenson’s novel also depicts an extremely globalized future, founded on molecular nanotech, rapidly assembled usable goods, and socio-cultural division. The title’s allusion to a “Diamond Age” fully based on nanotechnology (diamonds can be assembled from individual carbon atoms) is a complex commentary on economics and how an object loses its value through mass production.

The Diamond Age

By Neal Stephenson,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked The Diamond Age as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

CULT AUTHOR NEAL STEPHENSON'S UNSTOPPABLE SCI-FI CLASSIC

The future is small. The future is nano . . .

And who could be smaller or more insignificant than poor Little Nell - an orphan girl alone and adrift in a world of Confucian Law, Neo-Victorian values and warring nanotechnology?

Well, not quite alone. Because Nell has a friend, of sorts. A guide, a teacher, an armed and unarmed combat instructor, a book and a computer: the Young Lady's Illustrated Primer is all these and much much more. It is illicit, magical, dangerous.

And it isn't Nell's. It was stolen. And now…


Soulless

By Gail Carriger,

Book cover of Soulless

Alexia is *chef’s kiss* when I think of witty women who figure it out for everyone else. She’s clever and funny. She knows how to turn a polite phrase into an insult that sparks the action she wants the insulted to take. And she knows how to get a job well done. Though there are often times she doubts being desirable or wanted, she’s confident in her abilities and that her expectations are worth being met. I love how she always seems to put herself in the middle of trouble, but not without power.

Soulless

By Gail Carriger,

Why should I read it?

6 authors picked Soulless as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Alexia Tarabotti is labouring under a great many social tribulations. First, she has no soul. Second, she's a spinster whose father is both Italian and dead. Third, she was rudely attacked by a vampire, breaking all standards of social etiquette.
Where to go from there? From bad to worse apparently, for Alexia accidentally kills the vampire - and then the appalling Lord Maccon (loud, messy, gorgeous, and werewolf) is sent by Queen Victoria to investigate.
With unexpected vampires appearing and expected vampires disappearing, everyone seems to believe Alexia responsible. Can she figure out what is actually happening to London's high…


The Time Traveler's Wife

By Audrey Niffenegger,

Book cover of The Time Traveler's Wife

This novel (and film) divides the time travel fan community. I get it. Is it too sappy to be science fiction? Is it too abstract to be a love story? I had never read nor seen the film until a fellow author had read my own novel and said how much parts of it reminded her of Time Traveler’s Wife, just minus the overly sappy romance. This made me check it out, and I did see how the main character can transport through no explanation (and no time machine!). It just … happens. I knew my novel was going to have time travel just “happen” to my main character for the first 2/3 of the novel, then the last third would be where the science fact explanation would poke its head out and reveal itself. I appreciated how Time Traveler’s Wife kept it ambiguous, and I noticed how much…

The Time Traveler's Wife

By Audrey Niffenegger,

Why should I read it?

15 authors picked The Time Traveler's Wife as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Now a series on HBO starring Rose Leslie and Theo James!

The iconic time travel love story and mega-bestselling first novel from Audrey Niffenegger is "a soaring celebration of the victory of love over time" (Chicago Tribune).

Henry DeTamble is a dashing, adventurous librarian who is at the mercy of his random time time-traveling abilities. Clare Abshire is an artist whose life moves through a natural sequential course. This is the celebrated and timeless tale of their love. Henry and Clare's passionate affair is built and endures across a sea of time and captures them in an impossibly romantic trap…


Time Enough For Love

By Robert A. Heinlein,

Book cover of Time Enough For Love

Heinlein is a master of science fiction. This book is only incidentally—but also irrevocably—about time travel. The life of Lazarus Long, who appears in other works by Heinlein, inspired me to write about longevity in my two-volume novel. Heinlein’s story of adorable Dora will bring tears to your eyes, and it shows how immortality can be a curse if you dare to love someone. Heinlein shares a lot of common sense, too, in the incorporated Notebooks of Lazarus Long.

Time Enough For Love

By Robert A. Heinlein,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Time Enough For Love as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The capstone and crowning achievement of  the Future History series, from the New York Times bestselling Grand Master of Science Fiction...

Time Enough for Love follows Lazarus Long through a vast and magnificent timescape of centuries and worlds. Heinlein's longest and most ambitious work, it is the story of a man so in love with Life that he refused to stop living it; and so in love with Time that he became his own ancestor.


The Land that Time Forgot

By Edgar Rice Burroughs,

Book cover of The Land that Time Forgot

This three-volume series is not actually about traveling in time. The main characters survive being torpedoed in World War I, are taken aboard the German submarine, and travel to an unknown continent in the South Atlantic where dinosaurs, missing-link humans, and other oddities survive. I mention this book here because I read it as a teenager, long before H.G. Wells’s The Time Machine, and it gave me a taste for putting modern humans into an earlier time frame—and that is the basis of at least half the time-travel stories.

The Land that Time Forgot

By Edgar Rice Burroughs,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Land that Time Forgot as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The Land That Time Forgot opens with the discovery near Greenland of a floating thermos flask containing a manuscript by castaway Tyler Bowen, Jr. The document recounts a series of adventures that starts with a sea battle against a German U-boat and ends on a mysterious island populated by hostile prehistoric animals and people.

The second part of the book, “The People That Time Forgot,” continues the story with the tale of Tom Billings, who has been sent on a mission to rescue Bowen after his manuscript was discovered. He flies solo over the mountainous cliffs that encircle the island…


Somewhere in Time

By Richard Matheson,

Book cover of Somewhere in Time

Matheson is another master, whose works are almost forgotten now. This novel employs another unique means of travel—putting yourself in a period setting and just wishing hard enough, or through auto-hypnosis. That is not terribly credible, but then neither is time travel itself. And like several of the other books I value here, this is a love story with the characters making some hard choices. And once again, something from the present plays an important role.

Somewhere in Time

By Richard Matheson,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Somewhere in Time as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Matheson's classic novel tells the moving, romantic story of a modern man whose love for a woman he has never met draws him back in time to a luxury hotel in San Diego in 1896, where he finds his soul mate in the form of a celebrated actress of the previous century. "Somewhere in Time" won the World Fantasy Award for Best Novel, and the 1979 movie version, starring Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour, remains a cult classic whose fans continue to hold yearly conventions to this day.


The Time Machine

By H.G. Wells,

Book cover of The Time Machine

The novella that gave birth to science fiction and introduced the world (and a very young me) to the magical concept of time travel. After hosting a dinner party, and via his “time machine” (a term coined by the author), the Time Traveller embarks on a journey to the year 802,701 when our Earth has evolved into a lush paradise seemingly void of industry. Humans have become fragile, docile, and childlike (the Eloi), lacking curiosity about their world or the discipline to maintain it or build upon it. They fear the night, but remain silent about their reason. The Time Traveller finally discovers the truth about their fears as fearsome subterranean creatures (the Morlocks) capture the Time Machine and set a trap to ensnare the Traveller. How did humanity evolve into such beings, he wonders, and will he ever be able to return home to tell his fantastic tale?…

The Time Machine

By H.G. Wells,

Why should I read it?

12 authors picked The Time Machine as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A brilliant scientist constructs a machine, which, with the pull of a lever, propels him to the year AD 802,701.

Part of the Macmillan Collector's Library; a series of stunning, clothbound, pocket-sized classics with gold foiled edges and ribbon markers. These beautiful books make perfect gifts or a treat for any book lover. This edition of The Time Machine features an introduction by Dr Mark Bould.

The Time Traveller finds himself in a verdant, seemingly idyllic landscape where he is greeted by the diminutive Eloi people. The Eloi are beautiful but weak and indolent, and the explorer is perplexed by…


Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency

By Douglas Adams,

Book cover of Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, so naturally, I won’t. If you’re checking out a list like this, you don’t need me to tell you about it. Instead, let’s talk about Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency. If you saw any of the 2016 BBC series based on the book–it’s nothing like that. It’s probably not much like the 2010 BBC series, either, but I never saw it, so who knows? In any event, if you enjoyed the classic humor of H2G2, Adams’s bizarre detective novel will help satisfy the craving for more that’s lurked within you since you finished the Guide and its four sequels.

Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency

By Douglas Adams,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This is the first of three 6 x 30 minute full-cast dramatisations from the author and production team that brought us the most recent three series of "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy". This first production is based on Douglas Adams' novel of the same name, adapted by Mike Stott and directed by the hugely acclaimed Dirk Maggs. This series of six half-hours features a stellar cast with Harry Enfield as the eponymous Holistic Detective, Billy Boyd as his client Richard Macduff, Olivia Coleman as his secretary Janice Pearce, Jim Carter as his nemesis DS Gilks, Andrew Sachs (as Professor…


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