10 books like The Crystal Cave

By Mary Stewart,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like The Crystal Cave. Shepherd is a community of 6,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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The Eagle of the Ninth

By Rosemary Sutcliffe,

Book cover of The Eagle of the Ninth

This was the book that made me want to write historical fiction. I cared so desperately about the characters that I wanted to be there with them, wishing I could do something to help; they are still very clear in my mind. We were living near the USAF Academy at the time, and I convinced my mother to drive me out to their library where I pored over and made copious notes on Roman military history so that I could write my own story about the missing Ninth Legion. (I still have the notes!) 

The Eagle of the Ninth

By Rosemary Sutcliffe,

Why should I read it?

6 authors picked The Eagle of the Ninth as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The Everyman edition reprints the classic black and white illustrations of C. Walter Hodges which accompanied the first edition in 1954.

Around the year 117 AD, the Ninth Legion, stationed at Eburacum - modern day York - marched north to suppress a rebellion of the Caledonian tribes, and was never heard of again. During the 1860s, a wingless Roman Eagle was discovered during excavations at the village of Silchester in Hampshire, puzzling archaeologists and scholars alike. Rosemary Sutcliff weaves a compelling story from these two mysteries, dispatching her hero, the young Roman officer Marcus Aquila, on a perilous journey beyond…


The Lovely Bones

By Alice Sebold,

Book cover of The Lovely Bones

Contemporary suspense, psychological fiction, the afterlife, family dynamics, and heaps of disturbing are the ingredients mixed together in The Lovely Bones. Fourteen-year-old Susie Salmon was raped and murdered. Only none of the living know who did it. But Susie knows. Her soul is stuck in the “Inbetween,” where she can watch the Earth below. She sees her family grieve. Sees her murderer, Mr. Harvey, who lives in her neighborhood near her school. Will he get caught? Or will Susie’s sister or another young girl be his next victim? As a ghostly “watcher” from the Inbetween, Susie narrates this compelling story and elevates it with her amazing voice. The message and emotional weight of The Lovely Bones will keep readers fully invested.

The Lovely Bones

By Alice Sebold,

Why should I read it?

7 authors picked The Lovely Bones as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The internationally bestselling novel that inspired the acclaimed film directed by Peter Jackson.

With an introduction by Karen Thompson Walker, author of The Age of Miracles.

My name was Salmon, like the fish; first name, Susie. I was fourteen when I was murdered on December 6, 1973.

In heaven, Susie Salmon can have whatever she wishes for - except what she most wants, which is to be back with the people she loved on earth. In the wake of her murder, Susie watches as her happy suburban family is torn apart by grief; as her friends grow up, fall in…


Flashman

By George MacDonald Fraser,

Book cover of Flashman

As a child I loved Thomas Hughes’s Tom Brown’s Schooldays, a Victorian novel set in Rugby, the famous boys’ school. One of the best bits was when the brutal, thuggish school bully, Flashman, was unmasked on a drunken spree and expelled. His life after school was chronicled, 100 years later, in MacDonald Frazer’s 12 Flashman novels. Far from being cowed by his disgrace, and despite his abject cowardice, fate helps Flashman to progress brazenly from strength to strength, a heartless manipulator who revels in behaving outrageously and getting away with it, runs through numberless women, and ends up covered in glory, a much-decorated and titled war hero. A shameless romp and a gripping read throughout.

Flashman

By George MacDonald Fraser,

Why should I read it?

6 authors picked Flashman as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

For George MacDonald Fraser the bully Flashman was easily the most interesting character in Tom Brown's Schooldays, and imaginative speculation as to what might have happened to him after his expulsion from Rugby School for drunkenness ended in 12 volumes of memoirs in which Sir Harry Paget Flashman - self-confessed scoundrel, liar, cheat, thief, coward -'and, oh yes, a toady' - romps his way through decades of nineteenth-century history in a swashbuckling and often hilarious series of military and amorous adventures. In Flashman the youthful hero, armed with a commission in the 11th Dragoons, is shipped to India, woos and…

A Wind in the Door

By Madeleine L'Engle,

Book cover of A Wind in the Door

Of Madeleine L’Engle’s books, A Wrinkle in Time gets all the attention. But as often happens, praise sometimes misses something great. Her follow-up to Wrinkle in that same series, A Wind in the Door, is extraordinary. In one particular way, Wind gets at a truth; that the scale of big to small, human to mitochondria, mitochondria to galaxy, is actually not as distancing as it seems. No matter what size, everything has an essential part to play. There is also a theme to the book that, then and now, I find particularly poignant; the value of putting down roots and deepening into your life. As sometimes happens with YA books, Wind offers something really valuable for adults. Plus it’s short, which is pretty cool.

A Wind in the Door

By Madeleine L'Engle,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Wind in the Door as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The Further Education of Oversoul Seven

By Jane Roberts,

Book cover of The Further Education of Oversoul Seven

This is a work of fiction written by Jane Roberts, famous as the writer of the Seth books. Through the novel form, Roberts gets across a plausible way to look at life, the fluid nature of time and some possible meaning and purpose to be found in reincarnation. It’s also pretty entertaining. Yay novels! There are three books in the Oversoul series. This, the second, is my favorite. 

The Further Education of Oversoul Seven

By Jane Roberts,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Further Education of Oversoul Seven as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Emmanuel's Book

By Pat Rodegast, Judith Stanton,

Book cover of Emmanuel's Book: A Manual for Living Comfortably in the Cosmos

I saved the best for last. In the mid-’80s, I was in a meditation group, and though we were centered around the teachings of Edgar Cayce, we read every new age and self-help book that came along. Far and away our favorite, with the most inspiring viewpoint, was Emmanuel’s Book. It was written a bit like poetry and I think there’s a reason for that. Emmanuel had a way of bypassing the human mind and speaking to us on a level deeper. As he liked to say: “Your life is none of your mind’s business.” Emmanuel has a way of putting you in contact with a knowing place within. As to whether or not you stay there, well that’s your personal mystical problem. 

Emmanuel's Book

By Pat Rodegast, Judith Stanton,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Emmanuel's Book as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Sharpe's Rifles

By Bernard Cornwell,

Book cover of Sharpe's Rifles: Richard Sharpe and the French Invasion of Galicia, January 1809

Cornwell is a solid prose writer, and his research is every bit as meticulous as MacDonald Fraser’s. That this book takes place in the Peninsula Campaign is what caused me to pick it from the shelf and give it a read in the first place. Everything from the strategy and tactics of generals to the gruelling life of the ordinary foot soldier - right down to the loading procedure for the Baker rifle - is intricately interwoven with the plot. A must-read for any amateur student of the Napoleonic Wars.

Sharpe's Rifles

By Bernard Cornwell,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Sharpe's Rifles as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Bernard Cornwell's action-packed series that captures the gritty texture of Napoleonic warfare--now beautifully repackaged

It's 1809, and Napoleon's army is sweeping across Spain. Lieutenant Richard Sharpe is newly in command of the demoralized, distrustful men of the 95th Rifles. He must lead them to safety--and the only way of escape is a treacherous trek through the enemy-infested mountains of Spain.


The Pathwork of Self-Transformation

By Eva Pierrakos,

Book cover of The Pathwork of Self-Transformation

Mystical quests are all well and good, but most things, even our quests, can be fodder for self-delusion. That’s just how humans are built. Learning the particulars of how we’re built is a powerful way to lessen that delusion. Sooner or later, some actual self-work becomes necessary. I haven’t come across a more effective roadmap to the self than what’s found in the Pathwork Lectures of Eva Pierrakos. This is channeled work, the idea of which may make you punch your computer screen. But the information in these lectures, about the inner workings of the human psyche, seems spot on. This book contains a sampling from a few of the lectures, a sort of dim sum of psychological wisdom.

The Pathwork of Self-Transformation

By Eva Pierrakos,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Pathwork of Self-Transformation as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Outlander

By Diana Gabaldon,

Book cover of Outlander

There’s a reason my Instagram profile says, ‘Mentally married to Jamie Fraser.’ ‘Cause it’s true!

Yes, he’s a fictional character. Yes, he’s a man written by a woman author. But neither matters when you escape into Jamie’s words—his declarations of fealty to his clan, his hatred for Black Jack Randall (boo, hiss), or his unflinching love of, Claire, his wife.

Gabaldon has created a mighty and fierce Scottish warrior who is intelligent, articulate, and oh so amazingly passionate! *waves fan frantically before face*

If I had to sum Jamie Fraser up in one word, it would be: loyal. 

Now, if only Claire would bugger off back through the stones and leave us be…

Outlander

By Diana Gabaldon,

Why should I read it?

18 authors picked Outlander as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Beat to Quarters

By C.S. Forester,

Book cover of Beat to Quarters

Forester is the perfect author for a young reader of Historical Fiction, pertaining to the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars in particular. The action is so riveting you’ll swear you can hear the crash of the broadsides, and the defiant growls of the salty tars as they weigh into the enemy with cold steel. However, his real gift is his knowledge of those stately old square-riggers in which Horatio Hornblower sailed. Indeed, I was so engrossed, that by the time I finished the series, I felt that I had a working knowledge of them from stem to stern.

Beat to Quarters

By C.S. Forester,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Beat to Quarters as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


5 book lists we think you will like!

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