The best hippie books

3 authors have picked their favorite books about hippies and why they recommend each book.

Soon, you will be able to filter by genre, age group, and more. Sign up here to follow our story as we build a better way to explore books.

Shepherd is reader supported. When you buy through links on our website, we may earn an affiliate commission (learn more).

Book cover of A Bill of Rites, A Bill of Wrongs, A Bill of Goods

Perhaps you’re already aware of all of these books. Well, allow me to introduce Nebraska-born author Wright Morris—a perpetually ignored force of nature. Morris mainly wrote award-winning fiction, but this collection of essays was a refreshing and straightforward way of looking at, to take one offbeat example, hippies: “Hippies share some knowledge of where they have been, but no demonstrable insight into where they are going…What they share is a condition, not a direction.” Morris even temporarily torpedoes his own genre to make his point. “Who needs fiction? What could be stranger than the news on the hour?” In 1968 America, the ‘truth’ was indeed stranger than fiction.

A Bill of Rites, A Bill of Wrongs, A Bill of Goods

By Wright Morris,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Bill of Rites, A Bill of Wrongs, A Bill of Goods as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Book by Morris, Wright


Who am I?

I’m a literary historian and I love reconstructing times in the past with enough factual detail that a reader feels as if they are there with the characters, side-by-side. I didn’t start this way. In fact, I wrote fiction for over a decade. It was only after writing eight atrocious, tension-less, now-in-a-box novels that I realized the books I enjoyed reading most were in the history and biography sections of a bookstore. Still, I was undeniably affected by my years in the trenches of fiction writing. As you may see from my choices, I love reading material from writers attempting to check the pulse of the country at that time. 


I wrote...

One Week in America: The 1968 Notre Dame Literary Festival and a Changing Nation

By Patrick Parr,

Book cover of One Week in America: The 1968 Notre Dame Literary Festival and a Changing Nation

What is my book about?

The major players in this story are names that just about every American has heard of: Ralph Ellison, Martin Luther King Jr., Norman Mailer, Lyndon B. Johnson, Joseph Heller, Kurt Vonnegut, William F. Buckley Jr. For one chaotic week in 1968, college students, talented authors, and presidential candidates grappled with major events. The result was one of the most historic literary festivals of the twentieth century.

One Week in America is a day-by-day narrative of the 1968 Notre Dame Sophomore Literary Festival and the national events that grabbed the spotlight that April week.

The 60s

By The New Yorker Magazine, Henry Finder (editor),

Book cover of The 60s: The Story of a Decade

Finder curated a retrospective collection of 60s books, theatre, music, television, poetry, architecture, and politics. It opens with passages from Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood, James Baldwin on civil rights, and Hannah Arendt on Eichmann.

Then John Updike muses on the big bang theory, E. J. Kahn, Jr. captures Harvard professors’ view of student protest. Next Kenneth Tynan reviews Bye Bye Birdie, Lillian Ross listens to Sergeant Pepper, then teams with Jane Kramer to parse Marshal McLuhan. Robert Rice muses on the humour of Mike Nichols and Elaine May, and A. J. Liebling looks at Cassius Clay before he became Muhammad Ali… and much more.

It’s a cornucopia of well-written, intellectually stimulating prose and poetry written in and about a perplexing decade. It illuminates what I remember—even when I don’t agree—and makes me aware of much that I missed, misunderstood, or misinterpreted at…

The 60s

By The New Yorker Magazine, Henry Finder (editor),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The 60s as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This fascinating anthology collects notable New Yorker pieces from the most tumultuous years of the twentieth century—including work by James Baldwin, Pauline Kael, Sylvia Plath, Roger Angell, and Muriel Spark—alongside new assessments of the 1960s by some of today’s finest writers.

Here are real-time accounts of these years, brought to immediate and profound life: Calvin Trillin reports on the integration of Southern universities, E. B. White and John Updike wrestle with the enormity of the Kennedy assassination, and Jonathan Schell travels with American troops into the jungles of Vietnam. Some of the truly timeless works of American journalism came out…


Who am I?

I was a teenager in the up-tight, homophobic, misogynist 50s that today’s right wing-nuts would like to inflict on us again. Born in 1941, I was a few years older than friends and relatives who homesteaded where land was cheap and neighbours tolerant, I shared their abhorrence of the Vietnam War. I admired them for daring to reject “the system,” but I was also troubled by their lack of foresight, which so often led to calamity. A lifetime later, some survivors of those hopeful times remain where they homesteaded; and many of those who left are still pursuing love, peace, and happiness.


I wrote...

The Hippies Who Meant It

By Seymour Hamilton,

Book cover of The Hippies Who Meant It

What is my book about?

The Hippies Who Meant It is about young people who went back to the land in Canada during the 60s and 70s.

Joe from the Bronx, and Beth the orphan escape New York City for Canada, hoping to leave their past lives—and American politics—behind them. At a peace march on their way north, their fortunes intertwine with the fate of Dick, a Royal Military College officer cadet. Armed with naïveté, optimism, and a little weed, the three homestead on Nova Scotia’s North Mountain. Unlike the hippies of summer, they make it through the first winter, with a little help from their friends. Then a man damaged by the Vietnam War threatens their peaceful lives.

Book cover of Ten Ever-Lovin' Blue Eyed Years With Pogo

Walt Kelly’s tales of Pogo Possum and Albert the Alligator in the Okefenokee Swamp began in 1948. Like many daily cartoon strips it featured anthropomorphic characters. The humour was sweet, gentle, and “ridickelwockle,” letting Pogo fly under the radar of censorship until they noticed that Kelly was lampooning politicians. “Family” newspapers banned the strip, but Kelly had captured his readers’ hearts.

Walt Kelley expressed the essence of the anti-Vietnam War protest when he had Pogo say, “We have seen the enemy and he is us.”

Ten Ever-Lovin' Blue Eyed Years With Pogo

By Walt Kelly,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Ten Ever-Lovin' Blue Eyed Years With Pogo as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

"The official history and commemoration of Pogo's first decade...all wrapped up with a running commentary by Walt Kelly."


Who am I?

I was a teenager in the up-tight, homophobic, misogynist 50s that today’s right wing-nuts would like to inflict on us again. Born in 1941, I was a few years older than friends and relatives who homesteaded where land was cheap and neighbours tolerant, I shared their abhorrence of the Vietnam War. I admired them for daring to reject “the system,” but I was also troubled by their lack of foresight, which so often led to calamity. A lifetime later, some survivors of those hopeful times remain where they homesteaded; and many of those who left are still pursuing love, peace, and happiness.


I wrote...

The Hippies Who Meant It

By Seymour Hamilton,

Book cover of The Hippies Who Meant It

What is my book about?

The Hippies Who Meant It is about young people who went back to the land in Canada during the 60s and 70s.

Joe from the Bronx, and Beth the orphan escape New York City for Canada, hoping to leave their past lives—and American politics—behind them. At a peace march on their way north, their fortunes intertwine with the fate of Dick, a Royal Military College officer cadet. Armed with naïveté, optimism, and a little weed, the three homestead on Nova Scotia’s North Mountain. Unlike the hippies of summer, they make it through the first winter, with a little help from their friends. Then a man damaged by the Vietnam War threatens their peaceful lives.

Your Soul's Gift

By Robert Schwartz,

Book cover of Your Soul's Gift: The Healing Power of the Life You Planned Before You Were Born

This book is written by a hypnotherapist who talked to various psychic mediums to apparently, channel spiritual knowledge on big-picture questions. Although this is very “woo woo,” I feel my hippy inheritance entitles me to such explorations! In the face of something as devastating as suicide, “whatever works,” works for me, and I found great consolation in the idea of a soul’s evolution through various reincarnations. The chapter on suicide presents a theory of Spirit, which sees the act of suicide not as a sin, but as a choice (though not a recommended one) that still allows for future growth. For those left behind, it charts a path through guilt and anger to eventual acceptance. 

Your Soul's Gift

By Robert Schwartz,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Your Soul's Gift as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In his groundbreaking first book, Your Soul's Plan: Discovering the Real Meaning of the Life You Planned Before You Were Born, Robert Schwartz brought the idea of pre-birth planning into the mainstream. Now, his compelling sequel delves even deeper. With detailed discussion and the deeply personal stories of his interviewees, Schwartz offers an incredible guide map to the soul and encourages his readers to heal at a profound level. Through complex ideas such as the development of greater self-love, an emergence from victim consciousness, and understanding the qualities you came into this lifetime to cultivate and express, Schwartz bestows practical…


Who am I?

I’m a Canadian writer, and a mother of three. I think I do qualify as an ACOH (Adult Child of Hippies). My mom taught elementary school, and my dad was a university professor, but otherwise they fully embraced the hippy movement. It was a rich childhood in terms of nature, literature, art, and foreign cultures, but dysfunctional and confusing on the emotional front. Sadly, dropping a lot of acid leads to a lifetime of anxiety and depression. My father descended into mental illness and opiate addiction when I was an adult, eventually leading to his suicide. I came to terms with his death by writing Corridor Nine


I wrote...

Corridor Nine

By Sophie Stocking,

Book cover of Corridor Nine

What is my book about?

Two worlds coexist in the novel Corridor Nine, the domestic life of Bernadette Macomber, housewife and mother of four, and an afterlife space where her father Fabian Macomber resides following his suicide. Having severed relations with her father seven years prior, Bernie cannot sleep for guilt. Now she returns to her parent’s home to find evidence of Fabian’s insanity and fiasco as a parent. Bernadette hunts for absolution as the constellation of her four children spirals increasingly out of control. Meanwhile, her father searches for a loophole through the bureaucracy of personal evolution. Seeking the promised land of Valhalla, or some suitable equivalent, he is abetted by the demon/angel Bune during a re-education period prior to his next incarnation.

Drop City

By T.C. Boyle,

Book cover of Drop City

This novel encapsulates my two loves; a fracturing society and the wilderness. Partially inspired by a real 60s commune, the storyline takes a turn when its free-loving hippies are ousted from their eternal summer of love. Lured by the promise of land and lack of authoritarian oversight, they pack up a school bus and head for Alaska. The characters quickly find that living truly ‘back to nature’ is much harsher and more deadly than they had imagined. Their struggle to adapt makes for unmissable scenes of both man’s inhumanity and solidarity.

Drop City shines where misogyny meets free love and California dreams crash-land in the Alaskan wilderness.

Drop City

By T.C. Boyle,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Drop City as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

It is 1970, and a down-at-the-heels California commune devoted to peace, free love, and the simple life has decided to relocate to the last frontier-the unforgiving landscape of interior Alaska-in the ultimate expression of going back to the land. Armed with the spirit of adventure and naive optimism, the inhabitants of "Drop City" arrive in the wilderness of Alaska only to find their utopia already populated by other young homesteaders. When the two communities collide, unexpected friendships and dangerous enmities are born as everyone struggles with the bare essentials of life: love, nourishment, and a roof over one's head. Rich,…


Who am I?

I’ve been fascinated by wild and lonely places since early childhood. Growing up in a small village, there were plenty to choose from. Foraging and an interest in the medicinal properties of plants grew out of that fascination, and later brought me to survival guides and the concept of survival itself. Hostile places, historical skills, and wilderness experiences all have a hold over my imagination. The notion of being prepared for humanity’s decline is something I find endlessly intriguing. Can such a thing be prepared for? What form will our destruction take and how does this affect the methods we need to survive it? I’ll probably keep reading and writing about it until we have an answer.


I wrote...

Stranded

By Sarah Goodwin,

Book cover of Stranded

What is my book about?

Stranded is the story of a reality show gone wrong on a remote Scottish island. Disasters and dissent leave Maddy, an outcast botanist, in a fight for survival against the elements and her fellow islanders. Extreme cold, starvation, poisonous plants, and a local legend of a witch all feature in this tale of survival and isolation. 

Book cover of The Last Whole Earth Catalog: Access to Tools

TWEC is a hippie homesteading encyclopedia: 450 tabloid-size pages of “mind-blowing,” semi-practical idealism. The back cover photo is of the earth from space. The caption reads, “We can’t put it together. It is together.”

The first pages of the 620,000 copies published in 1971 featured Buckminster Fuller on systems, Arthur Koestler on consciousness, Teilhard de Chardin on spirituality, and Paul Ehrlich on The Population Bomb.

TWEC primarily offered mail-order sources for books and tools about agriculture, farming, edible plants, gardening, raising goats, chickens, pigs, building solar-heated buildings, well-drilling, gold mining, and much more, including a continuing story of how Divine Right crossed the USA Urge, his ’63 VW Microbus.

Like youth culture in the 60s, The Last Whole Earth Catalog was varied, challenging, seditious, profound, silly, exciting, practical, confusing, and confused. I loved it.

The Last Whole Earth Catalog

By Stewart Brand,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Last Whole Earth Catalog as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

We are as gods and we might as well get used to it. So far remotely done power and glory - as via government, big business, formal education, church - has succeeded to the point where gross defects obscure actual gains. In response to this dilemma and to these gains a realm of intimate, personal power is developing - the power of individuals to conduct their own education, find their own inspiration, shape their own environment, and share the adventure with whoever is interested. Tools that aid this process are sought and promoted by The Next Earth Catalog.


Who am I?

I was a teenager in the up-tight, homophobic, misogynist 50s that today’s right wing-nuts would like to inflict on us again. Born in 1941, I was a few years older than friends and relatives who homesteaded where land was cheap and neighbours tolerant, I shared their abhorrence of the Vietnam War. I admired them for daring to reject “the system,” but I was also troubled by their lack of foresight, which so often led to calamity. A lifetime later, some survivors of those hopeful times remain where they homesteaded; and many of those who left are still pursuing love, peace, and happiness.


I wrote...

The Hippies Who Meant It

By Seymour Hamilton,

Book cover of The Hippies Who Meant It

What is my book about?

The Hippies Who Meant It is about young people who went back to the land in Canada during the 60s and 70s.

Joe from the Bronx, and Beth the orphan escape New York City for Canada, hoping to leave their past lives—and American politics—behind them. At a peace march on their way north, their fortunes intertwine with the fate of Dick, a Royal Military College officer cadet. Armed with naïveté, optimism, and a little weed, the three homestead on Nova Scotia’s North Mountain. Unlike the hippies of summer, they make it through the first winter, with a little help from their friends. Then a man damaged by the Vietnam War threatens their peaceful lives.

Adult Child of Hippies

By Willow Yamauchi,

Book cover of Adult Child of Hippies

I love this book because it makes me realize mine wasn’t the only crazy bohemian family out there! This extremely funny read with authentic ’60s photos is structured as a test to determine if you really are an ACOH (Adult Child of Hippies). People might find this strange, but humour was a necessary ingredient in my coming to terms with my father’s suicide (and the reason my novel is both tragic and funny). Although my father struggled with mental illness and addiction, he had a wickedly funny black sense of humour. For me, it is a tribute to my father to see the ridiculous and laugh even in the face of grief. Certainly, there is much to laugh about in the flower child era.

Adult Child of Hippies

By Willow Yamauchi,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Adult Child of Hippies as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Do you have a name such as Willow, River, Oak, or Sunshine? Have you ever lived in a commune, or done yoga naked with your family? If yes, then you are an Adult Child of Hippies (ACOH). ACOHs grew up in extreme conditions: eating sprouts, and lugging herbal tea to school in their Thermoses (if they were fortunate enough to make it to school). ACOHs were born and brought up mostly in the 70s and 80s. As their parents reveled in the counterculture, their children struggled with basic hygiene, not to mention broader social acceptance. Until now, this group has…


Who am I?

I’m a Canadian writer, and a mother of three. I think I do qualify as an ACOH (Adult Child of Hippies). My mom taught elementary school, and my dad was a university professor, but otherwise they fully embraced the hippy movement. It was a rich childhood in terms of nature, literature, art, and foreign cultures, but dysfunctional and confusing on the emotional front. Sadly, dropping a lot of acid leads to a lifetime of anxiety and depression. My father descended into mental illness and opiate addiction when I was an adult, eventually leading to his suicide. I came to terms with his death by writing Corridor Nine


I wrote...

Corridor Nine

By Sophie Stocking,

Book cover of Corridor Nine

What is my book about?

Two worlds coexist in the novel Corridor Nine, the domestic life of Bernadette Macomber, housewife and mother of four, and an afterlife space where her father Fabian Macomber resides following his suicide. Having severed relations with her father seven years prior, Bernie cannot sleep for guilt. Now she returns to her parent’s home to find evidence of Fabian’s insanity and fiasco as a parent. Bernadette hunts for absolution as the constellation of her four children spirals increasingly out of control. Meanwhile, her father searches for a loophole through the bureaucracy of personal evolution. Seeking the promised land of Valhalla, or some suitable equivalent, he is abetted by the demon/angel Bune during a re-education period prior to his next incarnation.

The Art of Misdiagnosis

By Gayle Brandeis,

Book cover of The Art of Misdiagnosis: Surviving My Mother's Suicide

Gayle Brandeis’s intimate memoir of wrestling with her mother’s suicide following a long mental illness kept me company in the ways it mirrored my own experience. It is sometimes easier to mourn a stranger’s pain, as you edge towards your own grief. Brandeis’s reading through her mother’s letters, with their paranoid delusions and grandiose aspirations, “passionate and creatively punctuated,” rang true to my father’s crazy literary outpourings. Her experiences of entering her mother’s home to witness the evidence of her last activities, to the almost physical trauma of learning the stark details of her mother’s suicide method, comforted me in their familiarity. The suicide of a mentally ill parent leaves a lot of guilt and confusion in its wake. Anger and resentment aren’t what one “should” feel after a death of a parent, but Brandeis doesn’t sugarcoat the complex mess of emotions that needs to be untangled. 

The Art of Misdiagnosis

By Gayle Brandeis,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Art of Misdiagnosis as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Award-winning novelist and poet Gayle Brandeis’s wrenching memoir of her complicated family history and her mother’s suicide

Gayle Brandeis’s mother disappeared just after Gayle gave birth to her youngest child. Several days later, her body was found: she had hanged herself in the utility closet of a Pasadena parking garage. In this searing, formally inventive memoir, Gayle describes the dissonance between being a new mother, a sweet-smelling infant at her chest, and a grieving daughter trying to piece together what happened, who her mother was, and all she had and hadn’t understood about her.

Around the time of her suicide,…


Who am I?

I’m a Canadian writer, and a mother of three. I think I do qualify as an ACOH (Adult Child of Hippies). My mom taught elementary school, and my dad was a university professor, but otherwise they fully embraced the hippy movement. It was a rich childhood in terms of nature, literature, art, and foreign cultures, but dysfunctional and confusing on the emotional front. Sadly, dropping a lot of acid leads to a lifetime of anxiety and depression. My father descended into mental illness and opiate addiction when I was an adult, eventually leading to his suicide. I came to terms with his death by writing Corridor Nine


I wrote...

Corridor Nine

By Sophie Stocking,

Book cover of Corridor Nine

What is my book about?

Two worlds coexist in the novel Corridor Nine, the domestic life of Bernadette Macomber, housewife and mother of four, and an afterlife space where her father Fabian Macomber resides following his suicide. Having severed relations with her father seven years prior, Bernie cannot sleep for guilt. Now she returns to her parent’s home to find evidence of Fabian’s insanity and fiasco as a parent. Bernadette hunts for absolution as the constellation of her four children spirals increasingly out of control. Meanwhile, her father searches for a loophole through the bureaucracy of personal evolution. Seeking the promised land of Valhalla, or some suitable equivalent, he is abetted by the demon/angel Bune during a re-education period prior to his next incarnation.

In the Wake of Suicide

By Victoria Alexander,

Book cover of In the Wake of Suicide: Stories of the People Left Behind

This helpful book digs into the stigma of suicide, how it has been viewed as taboo, and how the bodies of people who committed suicide have traditionally even been denied burial. The people left behind find themselves isolated by their shame and the fear that others will shy away from a topic considered sinful in most religions. This was certainly my experience. Had my father died of cancer or a heart attack, I would have talked openly of his death and received a lot of support. But I felt his mental illness, addiction, and suicide too dark a topic to impose on anyone.

Happy, functional families don’t go through things like this. It was an extension of the shame I’d internalized as a child growing up with socially divergent parents who struggled with mental health issues. Alexander, who lost her own mother to suicide, gives links to survivor support groups,…

In the Wake of Suicide

By Victoria Alexander,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked In the Wake of Suicide as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Breathtaking stories of incredible power for anyone struggling to find the meaning in the suicidal death of a loved one--and for all readers seeking writing that moves and inspires. After author Victoria Alexander's mother took her life, she spent the next ten years collecting stories from people, like herself, who have walked through one of life's most difficult journeys. The result is a beautifully written book of powerful, spellbinding stories told by those who were left behind--parents, children, spouses, lovers, friends, and colleagues. In the Wake of Suicide offers survivors the understanding, compassion, and hope they need to guide them…


Who am I?

I’m a Canadian writer, and a mother of three. I think I do qualify as an ACOH (Adult Child of Hippies). My mom taught elementary school, and my dad was a university professor, but otherwise they fully embraced the hippy movement. It was a rich childhood in terms of nature, literature, art, and foreign cultures, but dysfunctional and confusing on the emotional front. Sadly, dropping a lot of acid leads to a lifetime of anxiety and depression. My father descended into mental illness and opiate addiction when I was an adult, eventually leading to his suicide. I came to terms with his death by writing Corridor Nine


I wrote...

Corridor Nine

By Sophie Stocking,

Book cover of Corridor Nine

What is my book about?

Two worlds coexist in the novel Corridor Nine, the domestic life of Bernadette Macomber, housewife and mother of four, and an afterlife space where her father Fabian Macomber resides following his suicide. Having severed relations with her father seven years prior, Bernie cannot sleep for guilt. Now she returns to her parent’s home to find evidence of Fabian’s insanity and fiasco as a parent. Bernadette hunts for absolution as the constellation of her four children spirals increasingly out of control. Meanwhile, her father searches for a loophole through the bureaucracy of personal evolution. Seeking the promised land of Valhalla, or some suitable equivalent, he is abetted by the demon/angel Bune during a re-education period prior to his next incarnation.

Book cover of The Emotional Incest Syndrome: What to Do When a Parent's Love Rules Your Life

Although this book isn’t about suicide, I include it because families with mental health issues, often exacerbated by the “anything goes” ethos of hippy culture, can suffer from confused or “enmeshed” parent/child boundaries. It was one of the first, and I think best self-help books I ever read. With great clarity, it showed me what was destructive in my family of origin. Enmeshment or “parentification,” basically using a child to meet the emotional needs of an adult, is not widely understood and often goes undetected (versus more obvious physical or sexual abuse).

Dr. Love’s book gave me straightforward guidelines for being a non-destructive parent myself, something I think I did achieve due to much self-education and counselling prior to having kids. It’s always been obvious to me that my father’s mental illness and substance abuse took root in his very unhappy childhood. I think my father would be glad that…

The Emotional Incest Syndrome

By Patricia Love,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Emotional Incest Syndrome as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

From Dr. Patricia Love, a ground-breaking work that identifies, explores and treats the harmful effects that emotionally and psychologically invasive parents have on their children, and provides a program for overcoming the chronic problems that can result.


Who am I?

I’m a Canadian writer, and a mother of three. I think I do qualify as an ACOH (Adult Child of Hippies). My mom taught elementary school, and my dad was a university professor, but otherwise they fully embraced the hippy movement. It was a rich childhood in terms of nature, literature, art, and foreign cultures, but dysfunctional and confusing on the emotional front. Sadly, dropping a lot of acid leads to a lifetime of anxiety and depression. My father descended into mental illness and opiate addiction when I was an adult, eventually leading to his suicide. I came to terms with his death by writing Corridor Nine


I wrote...

Corridor Nine

By Sophie Stocking,

Book cover of Corridor Nine

What is my book about?

Two worlds coexist in the novel Corridor Nine, the domestic life of Bernadette Macomber, housewife and mother of four, and an afterlife space where her father Fabian Macomber resides following his suicide. Having severed relations with her father seven years prior, Bernie cannot sleep for guilt. Now she returns to her parent’s home to find evidence of Fabian’s insanity and fiasco as a parent. Bernadette hunts for absolution as the constellation of her four children spirals increasingly out of control. Meanwhile, her father searches for a loophole through the bureaucracy of personal evolution. Seeking the promised land of Valhalla, or some suitable equivalent, he is abetted by the demon/angel Bune during a re-education period prior to his next incarnation.

Or, view all 37 books about hippies

New book lists related to hippies

All book lists related to hippies

Bookshelves related to hippies