The best prehistory books

18 authors have picked their favorite books about prehistory and why they recommend each book.

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On the Road of the Winds

By Patrick Vinton Kirch,

Book cover of On the Road of the Winds: An Archaeological History of the Pacific Islands Before European Contact

I like to think of Patrick Kirch as “Mr. Pacific Archaeology”—no one has written more, or more winningly, about Polynesian prehistory—and On the Road of the Winds is his introduction to the field. First published in 2002 and reissued in an updated edition in 2017, this elegant, eminently readable survey not only covers the history of archaeology in Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia but explains how the archaeological findings of the past half-century relate to discoveries in biology, linguistics, cultural anthropology, botany, and countless other fields.

On the Road of the Winds

By Patrick Vinton Kirch,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked On the Road of the Winds as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The Pacific Ocean covers one-third of the earth's surface and encompasses many thousands of islands, which are home to numerous human societies and cultures. Among these indigenous Oceanic cultures are the intrepid Polynesian double-hulled canoe navigators, the atoll dwellers of Micronesia, the statue carvers of remote Easter Island, and the famed traders of Melanesia. Decades of archaeological excavations, combined with allied research in historical linguistics, biological anthropology, and comparative ethnography, have revealed much new information about the long-term history of these Pacific Island societies and cultures. On the Road of the Winds synthesizes the grand sweep of human history in…

Who am I?

A dual citizen of Australia and the US, Christina Thompson has traveled extensively in the Pacific, including through most of the archipelagoes in Polynesia. She is the author of two books about Polynesia: a memoir of her marriage to a Māori man called Come on Shore and We Will Kill and Eat You All and a history of the ancient voyagers of the Pacific called Sea People. She edits the literary journal Harvard Review and teaches in the writing program at Harvard University Extension. 


I wrote...

Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia

By Christina Thompson,

Book cover of Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia

What is my book about?

A thrilling intellectual detective story that looks deep into the past to uncover who first settled the islands of the remote Pacific, where they came from, how they got there, and how we know. For more than a millennium, Polynesians have occupied the remotest islands in the Pacific Ocean, a vast triangle stretching from Hawaii to New Zealand to Easter Island. Until the arrival of European explorers, they were the only people to have ever lived there. Both the most closely related and the most widely dispersed people in the world before the era of mass migration, Polynesians can trace their roots to a group of epic voyagers who ventured out into the unknown in one of the greatest adventures in human history.

How did the earliest Polynesians find and colonize these far-flung islands? How did a people without writing or metal tools conquer the largest ocean in the world? This conundrum, which came to be known as the Problem of Polynesian Origins, emerged in the eighteenth century as one of the great geographical mysteries of mankind.

Book cover of The Clan of the Cave Bear: Earth's Children, Book One

“Archeology” is the study of human prehistory through the excavation and analysis of artifacts and other physical remains. Author Jean M. Auel humanized what archeologists coldly classified as the human sub-species Homo Neanderthalensis, and changed literature forever. In her 1980 breakout novel The Clan of the Cave Bear she breathed life into bits of bone, stone chips, and cave art and, in the doing, made Neanderthals real to millions of readers. Jean M. Auel gave Neanderthals real hopes, fears, love and inner darkness. Through the eyes of a Cro-Magnon girl named Ayla, Auel saw Neanderthals not as primitive brutes, but fully realized people. This fictionalized humanity of what previously was only abstract scientific theory profoundly inspired me as a writer, and influenced my novel.

The Clan of the Cave Bear

By Jean M. Auel,

Why should I read it?

3 authors picked The Clan of the Cave Bear as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This novel of awesome beauty and power is a moving saga about people, relationships, and the boundaries of love.

Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read

Through Jean M. Auel’s magnificent storytelling we are taken back to the dawn of modern humans, and with a girl named Ayla we are swept up in the harsh and beautiful Ice Age world they shared with the ones who called themselves the Clan of the Cave Bear.

A natural disaster leaves the young girl wandering alone in an unfamiliar and dangerous land until she is found by…

Who am I?

Years ago, a young helicopter pilot struggled through thick fog to fly to his base in Southern Turkey. Through the mist, he briefly glimpsed a strange, Stonehenge-like ruin beneath his helicopter. The pilot would one day learn it was the excavation of Göbekli Tepe, a megalithic complex over 12,000 years old. These ruins were already ancient before the Great Pyramids were even built. I was that helicopter pilot, and this event inspired me to imagine the world that birthed Göbekli Tepe. That experience, and my five book recommendations, propelled me to write Black Sea Gods, the first novel in the epic fantasy series The Chronicles of Fu Xi.


I wrote...

Black Sea Gods: Chronicles of Fu Xi

By Brian Braden,

Book cover of Black Sea Gods: Chronicles of Fu Xi

What is my book about?

Before the Age of Mythology, there were Black Sea Gods.

The fish have disappeared from the sea. The animals have vanished from the land. All humanity, and even the gods, tremble under the specter of a pending cataclysm. A terrible curse has been cast by a mysterious power, one intended to destroy everything, even the gods. Humanity's last hope rests solely with a wandering demigod, a simple fisherman, and a banished slave girl. Beset on all sides by ancient foes, both immortal and mundane, they must act quickly to avert this dark curse. Over seven days, the defining struggle of gods and humans begins under the onslaught of a powerful force whose true purpose remains shadowed.

Book cover of Who We Are and How We Got Here: Ancient DNA and the New Science of the Human Past

This book explains in a wonderful language how we became the humans we are, from the roots in Africa to the spreading across continents. It even reconstructs the genetic fingerprints of Tschingis Kan in the modern human genome along his war routes. From DNA recovered from bones we also learn how waves of migrations with associated pandemics replace one continental gene pool with another one, and how the Americas were inhabited. Every educated person can understand this book. Truly eye-opening. 

Who We Are and How We Got Here

By David Reich,

Why should I read it?

3 authors picked Who We Are and How We Got Here as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The past few years have witnessed a revolution in our ability to obtain DNA from ancient humans. This important new data has added to our knowledge from archaeology and anthropology, helped resolve long-existing controversies, challenged long-held views, and thrown up remarkable surprises.

The emerging picture is one of many waves of ancient human migrations, so that all populations living today are mixes of ancient ones, and often carry a genetic component from archaic humans. David Reich, whose team has been at the forefront of these discoveries, explains what genetics is telling us about ourselves and our complex and often surprising…

Who am I?

I love books on our living world that take a wide perspective, employ a simple and clear voice, are intellectually appealing, and are conclusive. Bringing things ‘to the point’ has been my own principle of academic teaching for decades. Teaching plant sciences across all grades, I always tried to be ‘emotionally touching’ because this is the best way to create lasting knowledge. I am convinced that good science does not require jargon and can sell in everyday, common language and does best, if it goes to heart. The books I am listing, adopt this principles of communication. They open an arena of basic natural science knowledge about the world we are part of. 


I wrote...

Alpine Plant Life: Functional Plant Ecology of High Mountain Ecosystems

By Christian Körner,

Book cover of Alpine Plant Life: Functional Plant Ecology of High Mountain Ecosystems

What is my book about?

Plant life in the cold alpine world across the globe reveals fundamentals of biology. The 500-page, richly illustrated book is written in a way that helps non-specialists to dive into 17 chapters of telling stories about climate, soils, life under snow, freezing stress, how plants use water and acquire nutrients and carbon, how they grow and reproduce and what a warmer future will bring to them. It is the only book on that subject that has interested a broad readership from students of biology, interested lay readers, conservationists, and people who like mountain climbing and wish to understand what they see along their path.

Europe's Lost World

By Vincent Gaffney, Simon Fitch, David Smith

Book cover of Europe's Lost World: The Rediscovery of Doggerland

Ever since deep-sea fishing vessels started to bring up artifacts and the bones of extinct land animals from the floor of the North Sea (UK), there has been a suspicion that a once-inhabited submerged land lay there. Named Doggerland, this land has now been investigated in more detail than any other. We know how people lived there, what the topography and vegetation were like, what animals roamed there. And we know that about 8000 years ago, Doggerland – the last land link between the British Isles and the rest of Europe – became submerged.  A gripping and hugely compelling account.

Europe's Lost World

By Vincent Gaffney, Simon Fitch, David Smith

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Europe's Lost World as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This excellent book, which deserves a wide readership, reports on the work of the North Sea Palaeolandscapes Project, which has been researching the fascinating lost landscape of Doggerland which until the end of the last Ice Age connected Britain to the continent in the North Sea area. It aims to make the findings available to a general readership, and show just how impressive they have been, with nearly 23,000km2 mapped. The techniques used to reconstruct the landscape are explained, and conclusions and speculation about the climate and vegetation of the area in the Mesolithic offered. It also tells the story…

Who am I?

Growing up in post-WWII Europe, young people’s anxiety was often channelled into searching for ‘lost worlds’, places hope could be nurtured and ancient solutions revived. So I encountered Atlantis and Lemuria and other imagined places but also learned, from training as a geologist, that once-populated lands had actually been submerged. Myths and legends often contain grains of observational truth at their heart. The more ‘submergence stories’ I research, from Australia through India and across northwest Europe, the more I realize how much we have forgotten about undersea human pasts. And how our navigation of the future could be improved by understanding them.


I wrote...

Worlds in Shadow: Submerged Lands in Science, Memory and Myth

By Patrick Nunn,

Book cover of Worlds in Shadow: Submerged Lands in Science, Memory and Myth

What is my book about?

Across the world, we find stories about lands under the ocean said to have once been occupied by people just like us. Most of us think this just cannot be true, so we dismiss these stories as ‘myths and legends’, entertaining yet baseless. Yet after the end of the last great ice age, melting land ice raised the ocean surface 120 meters (almost 400 feet) over several thousand years. This so traumatized coastal peoples that they encoded their memories of land loss in oral traditions which morphed into ‘myths and legends’ to reach us today. 

Our ancestors’ encounters with rising oceans can be reconstructed and, as this book shows, help us rationalize and cope with expected future sea-level rise.

Warrior Scarlet

By Rosemary Sutcliff,

Book cover of Warrior Scarlet

From her earliest years, Sutcliff knew firsthand what it was to live with and surmount painful disability. She understood what it was to be ‘the other’—to be looking from the outside on those able to live ‘normal’ lives. It is not surprising then that many of her stories include main characters who powerfully prove you do not need to be able-bodied to triumph over life. Set in the British Bronze age, this novel is one of those stories. Dem wants to take his place as a warrior of his tribe but must kill a wolf single-handedly to claim his warrior’s scarlet cloak. How can kill his wolf when he was born with a withered arm? With great sensitivity, skill, and prose often close to poetry, Sutcliff brings the Bronze age and its people alive in this wonderfully told story.  

Warrior Scarlet

By Rosemary Sutcliff,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Warrior Scarlet as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Drem longs for the day he will win his Warrior Scarlet. But with a withered spear arm, how will he take part in the ritual Wolf Slaying which will prove his worth as a man of the tribe?

With over forty books to her credit, Rosemary Sutcliff is now universally considered one of the finest writers of historical novels for children. Winer of the Carnegie Medal and many other honours, Rosemary was awarded a CBE in 1992 for services to children's literature.


Who am I?

I’m an Australian author passionate about history. Alas, not Australian history. That would make my life so much easier. As a child, I loved tales of ancient Greece. That love took me in two directions—Ancient Egypt and Ancient Rome—Ancient Rome introduced me to Roman Britain, and the Roman Britain novels of Rosemary Sutcliff. My love of history probably explains why a childhood friend gave me a child’s book of English history for my tenth birthday. One of the book’s chapters told the story of Elizabeth I. As she wont to do in her own times, Elizabeth hooked me, keeping me captured ever since, and enslaved to writing and learning more about Tudors.


I wrote...

The Light in the Labyrinth: The Last Days of Anne Boleyn.

By Wendy J. Dunn,

Book cover of The Light in the Labyrinth: The Last Days of Anne Boleyn.

What is my book about?

In the winter of 1535, young Kate Carey lives with her mother and her new family, far from the royal court. Unhappy with her life and wishing to escape her home, she accepts the invitation of Anne Boleyn, the aunt she idolises, to join her household in London.

But the dark, dangerous labyrinth of Henry VIII’s court forces Kate to grow up fast as she witnesses her aunt’s final tragic days — and when she discovers a secret that changes her life forever. All things must end—all things but love.

The Valley of Horses

By Jean M. Auel,

Book cover of The Valley of Horses

This is Book Two of her Earth’s Children series, and my favorite of this sweeping saga of the human experience. As a lover of history, archaeology, and sociology, as well as an animal lover and horse fanatic, I was immersed in the survival and existence of our resourceful, compassionate ancestors, making tools and clothing, finding food, building shelters, and domesticating animals. Not to mention the, ummmm, cave erotica. Jean Auel paints a vivid canvas of how the world appeared, gives us a taste of the cuisine and the vastness of the steppes and plains of prehistory. Spellbinding and engaging, I still reminisce of Ayla and Jondalar and their incredible journeys. Ms. Auel is a favorite author to listen to at writer’s conferences.   

The Valley of Horses

By Jean M. Auel,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Valley of Horses as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This unforgettable odyssey into the distant past carries us back to the awesome mysteries of the exotic, primeval world of The Clan of the Cave Bear, and to Ayla, now grown into a beautiful and courageous young woman.

Cruelly cast out by the new leader of the ancient Clan that adopted her as a child, Ayla leaves those she loves behind and travels alone through a stark, open land filled with dangerous animals but few people, searching for the Others, tall and fair like herself. The short summer gives her little time to look, and when she finds a sheltered…

Who am I?

My first spoken word was “wishy” for horsey, yes, I was born with the horse gene. My medieval fetish is nearly as deep, starting at five years old when my aunt took me to see Disney’s Sleeping Beauty. As a kid, I lived my fantasies through drawing and painting, with stories always playing in my head. When the voices became too strong, I turned to writing. I have researched the Middle Ages into and beyond middle age, dragging my family from castle to cathedral. My husband and I live on and run a boarding ranch with nearly fifty horses. We no longer travel to Europe, but we ride and shoot. Thus, the research continues.    


I wrote...

Archer's Grace: Book One, Dahlquin Series

By Anne M. Beggs,

Book cover of Archer's Grace: Book One, Dahlquin Series

What is my book about?

AD 1224, remote Connacht, Ireland, is a volatile island poised for civil war, with England always threatening. Dahlquin and Scragmuir are bitter enemies, locked in a feud older than memory, neighboring Ashbury is an equal, neutral ally with both. Eloise, sole heir of Dahlquin rebels against her patriarchal society, preferring her horse and hounds to spinning and ledgers until a treasonous siege catapults her and a stranger from her ancestral home, launching them on a perilous journey and spiritual quest across Ireland. Confronting self and societal doubts Eloise must take on far more than she ever expected, finding love and conflict as she comes of age in this historical epoch.  

People of the Longhouse

By W. Michael Gear, Kathleen O'Neal Gear,

Book cover of People of the Longhouse: A Novel of North America's Forgotten Past

No list of historical fiction depicting the Indians’ way of life would be complete without the inclusion of a book by the Gears, who’ve written many novels of Native life years before the arrival of European explorers.

I like this book because it’s a bit of a retelling of Hansel and Gretel set in the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) culture. Two young children are among many captured by a witch and bound for an uncertain fate. The book delves into the widespread fear of witches in many Indian cultures and also offers a glimpse of life among the Haudenosaunee, who famously lived in large agricultural communities, dwelling in longhouses surrounded by palisades.

People of the Longhouse

By W. Michael Gear, Kathleen O'Neal Gear,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked People of the Longhouse as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Six hundred years ago in what would become the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada, five Iroquois tribes were locked in bitter warfare. From the ashes of violence, a great Peacemaker was born…

Young Odion and his little sister, Tutelo, live in fear that one day Yellowtail Village will be attacked. When that day comes and Odion and Tutelo are marched away as slaves, their only hope is that their parents will rescue them.

Their mother, War Chief Koracoo, and their father, Deputy Gonda, think they are tracking an ordinary war party herding captive children to an enemy village. Koracoo…


Who am I?

I’ve written seven books, all along the theme of adventure in one way or another, but my best-known work is that of my novels of the Ojibwe Indians. As a child, I grew up on a farm where my dad discovered scores of arrowheads and artifacts while plowing the fields. This was a deep revelation for me as to the extent of Indian culture and how little we know of its people. In my books, Windigo Moon and The Wolf and The Willow, I try to bring the world of the 1500s and its Native peoples to life.


I wrote...

The Wolf and The Willow

By Robert Downes,

Book cover of The Wolf and The Willow

What is my book about?

The Wolf and The Willow is a novel of first contact between Native peoples and European explorers. Willow, a house slave of a Moroccan lord, is swept up in the 1528 expedition of conquistador Panfilo Narvaez to the New World. There, she meets Animi-Ma’lingan (He Who Outruns the Wolves), a young trader and storyteller who is on a mission to find a mysterious animal for the shamans of the Ojibwe people. Together, Willow and Wolf must outwit their captors on a journey up the Mississippi River through the heart of many thriving Indian civilizations.

The novel delves into the culture of the Ojibwe, Odawa, Mandan, Dakota Sioux, Caddo, and other tribes, culminating in a showdown at the great pyramid of Cahokia near present-day St. Louis.

The Sunbird

By Wilbur Smith,

Book cover of The Sunbird

The Sunbird was Wilber Smith’s first book. It was one of the first books on Wild African Adventure that I read and has kindled in me a lifelong passion for Africa, African animals, and the love of wildlife. It was a reason that I became a veterinarian and that I wanted to work with African Wildlife. It is a mix of contemporary and historic African Fiction. It is memorable because it is a wonderful story that I would want to share around the fire in a camp somewhere in the heart of the African bush. I would want Wilbur Smith to tell me the story as we sit around the fire. It evokes all that is magical and wonderful about Africa, the continent I love and live on. The book taught me that the story is paramount. Not the skill of the author as a literary giant. I want to…

The Sunbird

By Wilbur Smith,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Sunbird as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A photograph and a curse are the only clues Dr Ben Kazin has before he stumbles on the archaeological discovery. Beneath the red cliffs of Botswanaland a civilization has remained buried for millennia. But the magic of uncovering a lost culture is interrupted by the violence of terrorists, love, intrigue and the secrets of centuries.

Who am I?

I am a veterinarian who has worked extensively with African Wildlife in the heart of the African bush. I have also met African Sangoma’s, witch doctors. I have made a study of African mysticism and Ancestral communications and have participated in African mystic rituals, including the cleansing ritual called smudging or burning of herbs and utilizing the smoke for spiritual cleansing. In my books, I fuse my knowledge of African wildlife, African customs and rituals, and my innate ability to tell a good story and have brought forth the Jamie James series. They are quintessential African Adventures taking place in the heart of the African bush.


I wrote...

The Curse of the Ancestors, with Jamie James

By Roy Aronson,

Book cover of The Curse of the Ancestors, with Jamie James

What is my book about?

Jamie James is 15. His parents have been divorced since he was five and he has not heard from his father since the divorce. Suddenly he receives a communication from him, beseeching him to come and visit because their lives are in danger. His father lives in Nelspruit, the wildlife capital of Southern Africa. He travels there and discovers that there is a death curse on his family and his father, who turns fifty in a few weeks is about to die. Jamie undergoes a mystical transformation to lift the curse. Can Jamie and his friends lift the curse in time to save his father. Join them in a race against time to change the fate of his family that is two hundred years in the making?

The First Drawing

By Mordicai Gerstein,

Book cover of The First Drawing

The first thing I love about this book is the very unusual use of 2nd person: “You live in a cave with your parents.” The child in this story loves exploring and using his imagination. Everyone else is busy with the job of surviving. The child sees shapes in the clouds and wonders why no one else can see what he sees. One night, without thinking, he takes a stick and draws on the cave walls. Now everyone can see what he sees, and it is the first-ever drawing. Everyone is amazed by it, thinks it is magic, and it is! The ability to use our imaginations to create art is magic, and it is what the author has done in this book, inspired by the real first drawing.

The First Drawing

By Mordicai Gerstein,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The First Drawing as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In 1994, the Cave of Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc was discovered, filled with the oldest known drawings in existence at that time, made 30,000 years ago. In that same cave, prehistoric footprints were discovered: those of an 8-year-old child and a wolf. From these astonishing facts, THE FIRST DRAWING was born.

In this beautiful picture book, Caldecott Medal-winning author/illustrator Mordicai Gerstein imagines one possible way drawing was invented. The young boy that stars in this story has such a vivid imagination that he sees images everywhere - clouds, stones and smoke look like animals to him. His parents, however, don't share his enthusiasm…


Who am I?

When I was little, I knew I would work with books in some way, and I did, for many years working for one of the major children’s book publishers. But it wasn’t rewarding in the way I had hoped. Some kids know they want to be a teacher when they grow up. I definitely did not, yet I became one. I love finding ways to make learning fun. In my teaching days I found ways to get the most reluctant students to find something they could enjoy about learning. And now as an author, I find myself doing the same, and as a parent, seeking out books like the ones I recommend here that teach without teaching.


I wrote...

No Place Like Earth

By Lori Fettner, Michael Fettner (illustrator),

Book cover of No Place Like Earth

What is my book about?

A child’s dream takes us on a journey through space. The child looks for a place to land while passing each planet, but some are too hot, some are too cold, and some are just made of liquid and gas. In the end, the child heads home for the night, realizing Planet Earth is just right.

Fun rhyming text introduces children to each planet and interesting facts about it. The text is accompanied by stunning images, courtesy of NASA, as the child passes by each planet in order. This book fills a gap for children interested in space, who are too old for board books, but not yet old enough for longer picture books, and reminds us all why we must take care of this planet we call home. 

Stonehenge

By Bernard Cornwell,

Book cover of Stonehenge

Why was Stonehenge built? What was its function? Cornwell offers a new interpretation that is both eminently possible and completely believable. Transporting us back to a time long forgotten, he makes us believe. And that is no easy task! When I first gazed in person upon Stonehenge, my thoughts, like those of almost everyone else, were consumed with “Why” and “How.” But this book takes us further into the mystery by asking “Who?” What motivated the first builders, and those who followed after them for thousands of years? They were “just folks,” like us. But they must have been motivated by something that we, sad to say, are lacking.    

Stonehenge

By Bernard Cornwell,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Stonehenge as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Bernard Cornwell's brilliant novel, reissued for fans to find out the story behind the stones. This is the tale of three brothers and of their rivalry that created this great temple.

One summer's day, a dying stranger carrying great wealth in gold comes to the settlement of Ratharryn.

The three sons of Ratharryn's chief each perceive the great gift in a different way. The eldest, Lengar, the warrior, harnesses his murderous ambition to be a ruler and take great power for his tribe. Camaban becomes a great visionary and feared wise man, and it is his vision that will force…


Who am I?

I am an author, theologian, musician, historian, and college professor who has written more than twenty books about ancient and alternative history, religion in modern culture, and long-distance, meditative bicycling. My study of the past convinced me that modern life has, for far too many of us, grown one-dimensional. It lacks the magic and mystery that imbued the ancients with the deep and rich mythology which we inherited from them, but then allowed to grow dormant within our sheltered lives. Remembering their vision and experience is a key to restoring our own sense of self-worth and essence. Maybe we all need to meet a “Wizard in the Wood!”


I wrote...

The Wizard in the Wood: A Tale of Magic, Mystery, and Meaning

By Jim Willis,

Book cover of The Wizard in the Wood: A Tale of Magic, Mystery, and Meaning

What is my book about?

I have come to suspect that life is magical. It’s silly to pretend that magic doesn’t exist because we think we are too sophisticated to acknowledge it. Michael knew that. He lived his life with the certainty that magic surrounded him, through his every word and action. As I moved through my adulthood, I forgot how to see magic. I am the poorer for it. But now that I have finally, and fortunately, discovered it again, I feel the need to tell you about how at least one man lived in the glow of magic, and taught a young boy how to do the same.

Let me tell you the strange story of the wizard in the wood. If you’re lucky, it might change your life.

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