23 books like The Out-of-Sync Child

By Carol Stock Kranowitz,

Here are 23 books that The Out-of-Sync Child fans have personally recommended if you like The Out-of-Sync Child. Shepherd is a community of 10,000+ authors and super readers sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Book cover of The New Language of Toys: Teaching Communication Skills to Children with Special Needs, a Guide for Parents and Teachers

Lisa F. Geng Author Of The Late Talker

From my list on for parents who have a child with apraxia.

Why am I passionate about this?

I started as a designer, patented inventor, and creator in the fashion, toy, and film industries, but after the early diagnosis of my young children on the spectrum, both “late talkers,” diagnosed with multiple disorders including apraxia, I entered the world of nonprofit, research, and advocacy. I am the founder of the nonprofit Cherab Foundation where I've been outreaching for over twenty years. I've hosted numerous conferences including the first for apraxia overseen by a medical director from NIH who reviewed my protocol – the use of fish oils as a therapeutic intervention, published research on my patented nutritional intervention IQed Smart Nutrition, and co-authored the book The Late Talker to share my proven protocol and help others achieve the best possible results for their communication impaired children.

Lisa's book list on for parents who have a child with apraxia

Lisa F. Geng Why did Lisa love this book?

When you have a child with a severe communication impairment, they probably are in therapy almost every day of their life. Too often, I’ve found parents forget children with special needs are still children.  While appropriate speech therapy is critical for apraxia, children learn through play, and too often the importance of play is underestimated. What I love about The New Language of Toys is it shows us, the parents (as well as therapists) how to take typical toys found around the house to use as fun therapy tools to help bring your child a voice.  

 I used to work in toy design prior to being a parent so being able to use toys as therapy for speech is amazing. In addition, it helps the child’s self-esteem when you can teach them how to play, something that doesn’t always come naturally to a percentage of children with special needs. This…

By Sue Schwartz,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The New Language of Toys as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Book cover of Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism

Claire LaZebnik Author Of Hidden Brilliance: Unlocking the Intelligence of Autism

From my list on cherishing and enjoying your neurodivergent child.

Why am I passionate about this?

I always intended to be a fiction writer (and have written ten novels, both YA and adult) but my oldest child is autistic, which led to my meeting and then collaborating on several non-fiction books with Dr. Lynn Kern Koegel, who’s an expert in the autism field, currently at Stanford University. Finding myself writing non-fiction wasn’t the only way having an autistic child changed my life. When my son was first diagnosed, I didn’t know what that meant for his future, and I desperately wanted information—and even entertainmentthat made me feel inspired and hopeful. I needed to find my way toward feeling positive and not anxious, for both our sakes.

Claire's book list on cherishing and enjoying your neurodivergent child

Claire LaZebnik Why did Claire love this book?

So, in the interest of full disclosure, I should mention that I haven’t read this entire book, but I did read the original article that the book came out of and other articles by and about the Suskinds. 

Ron Suskind did exactly what Lynn Koegel and I believe all parents should do: he observed his son’s interest and used it as a bridge for communication and connection.

Disney was a huge part of our family life when our kids were little (and still plays a role in our lives today since one of my sons is a children’s television writer and another one has his own theme park video channel), so I love that it was Disney movies that brought the Suskinds together.

By Ron Suskind,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Life, Animated as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Ron Suskind tells the story of how his autistic son was able to regain the ability to speak through the medium of Disney animated films.

"Ron Suskind's "Life, Animated" is an extraordinary saga of an exceptional boy from a remarkable family and their compelling journey through autism."-David Royko, Chicago Tribune


Imagine being trapped inside a Disney movie and having to learn about life mostly from animated characters dancing across a screen of color. A fantasy? A nightmare? This is the real-life story of Owen Suskind, the son of the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ron Suskind and his wife,…


Book cover of Your Special Education Rights: What Your School District Isn't Telling You

Lisa F. Geng Author Of The Late Talker

From my list on for parents who have a child with apraxia.

Why am I passionate about this?

I started as a designer, patented inventor, and creator in the fashion, toy, and film industries, but after the early diagnosis of my young children on the spectrum, both “late talkers,” diagnosed with multiple disorders including apraxia, I entered the world of nonprofit, research, and advocacy. I am the founder of the nonprofit Cherab Foundation where I've been outreaching for over twenty years. I've hosted numerous conferences including the first for apraxia overseen by a medical director from NIH who reviewed my protocol – the use of fish oils as a therapeutic intervention, published research on my patented nutritional intervention IQed Smart Nutrition, and co-authored the book The Late Talker to share my proven protocol and help others achieve the best possible results for their communication impaired children.

Lisa's book list on for parents who have a child with apraxia

Lisa F. Geng Why did Lisa love this book?

Unlike parents who have a child that is born deaf or blind where protocols are in place by law, if you have a child with a communication impairment like apraxia, you have to advocate a lot for your child or they may not receive the therapies and placement that are appropriate for them. To make it even more complicated, there is no one set classification for a child with apraxia. If your child is deaf or has a diagnosis such as autism, the school system has a classification for those diagnoses. For just about any other communication impairment your child can be classified from “other health impaired” to “developmentally delayed” Some schools may have communication or speech impairments as a classification, but not all.

This book is a start to helping you learn how to become an advocate for your late talker child. After advocating for both of my special…

By Jennifer Laviano, Julie Swanson,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Your Special Education Rights as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Drawing on decades of experience, a special education attorney and sought-after special education advocate help parents of students with disabilities navigate their school systems to get the services they need for their children.

Parents will find no other book on special education like Your Special Education Rights. Julie and Jennifer demystify the federal laws that govern the rights of public school children with disabilities and explain how school districts often ignore or circumvent these laws. They pull the curtain back on the politics of special education, exposing truths that school districts don't want you to know, such as the fact…


Book cover of Chicken Soup for the Soul: All Your Favorite Original Stories Plus 20 Bonus Stories for the Next 20 Years

Lisa F. Geng Author Of The Late Talker

From my list on for parents who have a child with apraxia.

Why am I passionate about this?

I started as a designer, patented inventor, and creator in the fashion, toy, and film industries, but after the early diagnosis of my young children on the spectrum, both “late talkers,” diagnosed with multiple disorders including apraxia, I entered the world of nonprofit, research, and advocacy. I am the founder of the nonprofit Cherab Foundation where I've been outreaching for over twenty years. I've hosted numerous conferences including the first for apraxia overseen by a medical director from NIH who reviewed my protocol – the use of fish oils as a therapeutic intervention, published research on my patented nutritional intervention IQed Smart Nutrition, and co-authored the book The Late Talker to share my proven protocol and help others achieve the best possible results for their communication impaired children.

Lisa's book list on for parents who have a child with apraxia

Lisa F. Geng Why did Lisa love this book?

As a parent of a child diagnosed with apraxia, you probably have heard, “what’s wrong with him?” at least once. If not, be prepared, because when you hear it and you aren’t ready for it, it can feel like someone knocked the wind out of you. I didn’t only love the Chicken Soup for the Soul books for me, but I also would share the stories I felt were of interest with my boys who both were diagnosed as young children with severe special needs. What these books brought me and my boys was pride, hope, and inspiration that from a rough beginning, there can be a bright future. Actually, in some cases, these stories share it’s due to a rough start that the person ended up becoming a better person.

While my son Tanner was little and I read stories to him from the Chicken Soup for the Soul…

By Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, Amy Newmark

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Chicken Soup for the Soul as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The classic New York Times bestseller that started it all- and according to USA Today one of the top five books in the past quarter century "that leave a legacy." The Original... with 20 new bonus stories for the next 20 years!

Everyone is talking about it. Twenty years after its creation, this bestseller continues to change lives around the world. Rediscover the power of inspiration with timeless stories about the everyday miracles that illuminate the best of the human spirit.

Whether you're discovering Chicken Soup for the Soul for the first time, or you are a long-time fan, this…


Book cover of Sensory Processing Challenges: Effective Clinical Work with Kids & Teens

Carol Stock Kranowitz Author Of The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Differences

From my list on sensory processing differences.

Why am I passionate about this?

As a preschool teacher for 25 years, I observed many children with sensory processing differences (SPD), autism and ADHD. I wondered why they were uncomfortable touching finger paints, why they avoided swings and never let their feet leave the ground, why they broke crayons and tripped on-air, and why they felt inadequate playing and making friends. To help"out-of-sync" children become more competent in work and play, I learned to identify their sensory processing challenges and steer them into early intervention. My mission is to explain to families, teachers, and professionals how SPD affects learning and behavior, to offer practical solutions, and to see all children flourish.

Carol's book list on sensory processing differences

Carol Stock Kranowitz Why did Carol love this book?

Lindsey Biel's second book (less well known than her remarkable Raising a Sensory Smart Child) furthers her mission to explain sensory processing differences to occupational therapists, parents, and teachers. Her case studies are illuminating, as she describes her clients flourishing with individualized treatment. I love her positive approach, such as her Sensory Challenge Questionnaire that asks the child or young adult what sensory experiences are enjoyable, not just challenging. Her sensory strategies to use in the clinic, home, and school are the best!

By Lindsey Biel,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Sensory Processing Challenges as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Many children, teens, and even adults experience sensory processing challenges including out-of-proportion reactions to certain sensory experiences that most of us find commonplace. These challenges can range from mild to severe-from difficulty tolerating fluorescent lights and discomfort with certain clothing textures, to fight-or-flight reactions to unexpected or loud noises such as sirens or automatic hand dryers, or such strong oral sensitivities that the individual can tolerate eating just a few foods. They may struggle with one or more "sensory channels," or, more often, be quickly overwhelmed by the demand to process multisensory input (especially in busy environments with competing sights,…


Book cover of The Sensory Room Kids Get In Sync

Carol Stock Kranowitz Author Of The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Differences

From my list on sensory processing differences.

Why am I passionate about this?

As a preschool teacher for 25 years, I observed many children with sensory processing differences (SPD), autism and ADHD. I wondered why they were uncomfortable touching finger paints, why they avoided swings and never let their feet leave the ground, why they broke crayons and tripped on-air, and why they felt inadequate playing and making friends. To help"out-of-sync" children become more competent in work and play, I learned to identify their sensory processing challenges and steer them into early intervention. My mission is to explain to families, teachers, and professionals how SPD affects learning and behavior, to offer practical solutions, and to see all children flourish.

Carol's book list on sensory processing differences

Carol Stock Kranowitz Why did Carol love this book?

Kids who are out of sync because of sensory processing differences will enjoy this charming book written and illustrated by a third-grader. Abigail describes her classmates having a FIDDLE response to various sensations. (FIDDLE stands for Frequency, Intensity, Duration, Degree, Loneliness, and Exhaustion, as defined in my children’s book, The Goodenoughs Get In Sync). Abigail explains her friends' sensory challenges and suggests wise and easy solutions to help them get in sync.

By Abigail Grace Kroneberger,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Sensory Room Kids Get In Sync as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The Sensory System is a system in your body that tells you how to react with the world around you. But some people react differently to the world around them than other people do. They sometimes react by screaming, crying, hiding, running away or even just yelling. "Stop!" These people usually react in this way because their body's nerves are telling them how to react when they are feeling either excited, frustrated, mad, sad, upset or just thinking they can't do it. This does not mean that they are better or worse than other people. It just means that they…


Book cover of Lange Clinical Neurology

Greg Siofer Author Of Getting Out: My Story Plus The Exercises And Experience I Learned That Can Help You Get Out From The Wheelchair

From my list on physiotherapy for your recovery.

Why am I passionate about this?

Losing something is exceedingly difficult to accept, however, in sharing my story I hope it gives the personal motivation to recover the things that have been taken away. There is light in a tunnel you just must find it, my story I hope gives you that light.

Greg's book list on physiotherapy for your recovery

Greg Siofer Why did Greg love this book?

There were numerous articles I have read regarding the nervous system however, the most memorable book I read would be Clinical Neurology. It contained the information I required with it being an easy read, it provided clinically relevant information with an easy-to-follow guide that was outlined in the chapters. From my perspective student material relating to neurology have the best learning format of the material that is being presented like in this book.

By David A. Greenberg, Michael J. Aminoff, Roger P. Simon

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Lange Clinical Neurology as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Publisher's Note: Products purchased from Third Party sellers are not guaranteed by the publisher for quality, authenticity, or access to any online entitlements included with the product.

The clearest, most concise coverage of one of the most complex topics in medicine-updated with the latest advances in the field

Clinical Neurology, Eleventh Edition, provides a comprehensive overview of basic and clinical neurology in a concise, digestible format. It links clinical neuroscience to current approaches for accurately diagnosing and effectively treating neurologic disorders. Covering all the advances in molecular biology and genetics, this popular guide emphasizes history-taking and neurologic examination as the…


Book cover of An Anthropologist on Mars: Seven Paradoxical Tales

John E. Dowling Author Of Understanding the Brain: From Cells to Behavior to Cognition

From my list on healthy and compromised brains.

Why am I passionate about this?

I began research as an undergraduate at Harvard College, initially studying the effects of vitamin A deficiency on the photoreceptors in the eye that capture the light and initiate vision. After receiving my PhD and starting my own laboratory, I became fascinated with the other four classes of cells/neurons found in the retina, which begin the analysis of visual information: two being in the outer retina and two in the inner retina. We mapped out the synaptic interactions among the neurons, recorded from them, and began to put together the neural circuitries that underlie the visual messages that are sent to other parts of the brain. 

John's book list on healthy and compromised brains

John E. Dowling Why did John love this book?

One of Oliver Sack’s delightful books containing stories of individuals with various neurological disorders. I read the first one, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, back in the 1980s  when it first came out and was hooked, now having read almost all of them.

The one I am recommending is, I believe, more relevant to an understanding of brain mechanisms. One criticism I have had of Sack’s books is that there is little in the way of neurobiological explanations for the conditions described. In my book, most chapters begin with a Sack-like story about a specific neurological condition that is then explained, as far as possible, neurobiologically in the chapter.

By Oliver Sacks,

Why should I read it?

4 authors picked An Anthropologist on Mars as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

As with his previous bestseller, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, in An Anthropologist on Mars Oliver Sacks uses case studies to illustrate the myriad ways in which neurological conditions can affect our sense of self, our experience of the world, and how we relate to those around us.

Writing with his trademark blend of scientific rigour and human compassion, he describes patients such as the colour-blind painter or the surgeon with compulsive tics that disappear in the operating theatre; patients for whom disorientation and alienation - but also adaptation - are inescapable facts of life.

'An…


Book cover of The New Mind Readers: What Neuroimaging Can and Cannot Reveal about Our Thoughts

Mark Bartholomew Author Of Intellectual Property and the Brain: How Neuroscience Will Reshape Legal Protection for Creations of the Mind

From my list on how neuroscience will change our lives.

Why am I passionate about this?

I’m a law professor who has been teaching and writing in the area of intellectual property for 20 years. As my career went along, I came to realize how important it is to not just mechanically apply the legal rules but to think about why they are there. Intellectual property law—a 7 trillion-dollar legal regime governing one-third of the U.S. economy—continually guesses as to how the minds of artists and audiences work. The more I read about neuroscientific advances, the more I realized that these guesses are often wrong and need to be updated for a new technological age.

Mark's book list on how neuroscience will change our lives

Mark Bartholomew Why did Mark love this book?

This book does a great job of describing what is possible and what is not when it comes to neuroscience. Poldrack, a professor of psychology at Stanford, makes sure we don’t lose the forest for the trees, boiling down the basics of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a way that anyone can understand. He is particularly strong on describing about how this technology might be used outside of university laboratories, discussing potential applications in law, advertising, and treatment of mental illness.

By Russell A. Poldrack,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The New Mind Readers as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A revealing insider's account of the power-and limitations-of functional MRI

The ability to read minds has long been a fascination of science fiction, but revolutionary new brain-imaging methods are bringing it closer to scientific reality. The New Mind Readers provides a compelling look at the origins, development, and future of these extraordinary tools, revealing how they are increasingly being used to decode our thoughts and experiences-and how this raises sometimes troubling questions about their application in domains such as marketing, politics, and the law.

Russell Poldrack takes readers on a journey of scientific discovery, telling the stories of the visionaries…


Book cover of The Integrated Mind

James Blachowicz Author Of The Bilateral Mind as the Mirror of Nature: A Metaphilosophy

From my list on the nature and capacities of our bilateral minds.

Why am I passionate about this?

I’ve always had equally balanced interests in the arts/humanities and the natural sciences. I like to think that I inherited much of this from my analytical “algebraic” mother, who was a nurse and tended to our family finances, and my holistic “geometrical” father, who was a carpenter. It’s probably no accident that my double major in college was in physics and philosophy...and, down the line, that I should develop a focused interest in human brain laterality, where the division between analysis and holism is so prominent.

James' book list on the nature and capacities of our bilateral minds

James Blachowicz Why did James love this book?

Utilizing data from split-brain patients (whose left and right cerebral hemispheres had been surgically separated), the authors of this book focus on how our “two minds” yield a unitary consciousness.

This is the book that first lit the fire of inquiry for me. The whole idea was to understand the “integrated” mind by first understanding the minds of individuals that had been divided by severing the corpus callosum (which connected their two cerebral hemispheres) in order to alleviate medically intractable epilepsy.

It was suggested that in such individuals, their “minds” were divided as well. Yet some later studies did suggest that some intercommunication (through other channels) did survive.

By Michael S. Gazzaniga, Joseph E. LeDoux,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Integrated Mind as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In this book we are trying to illuminate the persistent and nag ging questions of how mind, life, and the essence of being relate to brain mechanisms. We do that not because we have a commit ment to bear witness to the boring issue of reductionism but be cause we want to know more about what it's all about. How, in deed, does the brain work? How does it allow us to love, hate, see, cry, suffer, and ultimately understand Kepler's laws? We try to uncover clues to these staggering questions by con sidering the results of our studies on…


5 book lists we think you will like!

Interested in apraxia, neurology, and autism?

10,000+ authors have recommended their favorite books and what they love about them. Browse their picks for the best books about apraxia, neurology, and autism.

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