10 books like A Wind in the Door

By Madeleine L'Engle,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like A Wind in the Door. Shepherd is a community of 6,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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The Further Education of Oversoul Seven

By Jane Roberts,

Book cover of The Further Education of Oversoul Seven

This is a work of fiction written by Jane Roberts, famous as the writer of the Seth books. Through the novel form, Roberts gets across a plausible way to look at life, the fluid nature of time and some possible meaning and purpose to be found in reincarnation. It’s also pretty entertaining. Yay novels! There are three books in the Oversoul series. This, the second, is my favorite. 

The Further Education of Oversoul Seven

By Jane Roberts,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Further Education of Oversoul Seven as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The Crystal Cave

By Mary Stewart,

Book cover of The Crystal Cave

This is the story that took me on my first voyage into the magical waters of Historical Romance, and from there on to the enchanted isles. Most readers think of Mary Stewart as a writer of Romantic Suspense, but her Merlin Trilogy is, for me, the definitive recounting of the Arthurian legend. This book showed me I can not only read Historical Romance, I can live, breathe, smell, and taste it. I can be Merlin. And I can live in Arthurian times, at least for a little while.

The Crystal Cave

By Mary Stewart,

Why should I read it?

7 authors picked The Crystal Cave as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The spellbinding story of Merlin's rise to power.

Vivid, enthralling, absolutely first-class - Daily Mail

So begins the story of Merlin, born the illegitimate son of a Welsh princess in fifth century Britain, a world ravaged by war. Small and neglected, with his mother unwilling to reveal his father's identity, Merlin must disguise his intelligence - and hide his occasional ability to know things before they happen - in order to keep himself safe.

While exploring the countryside near his home, Merlin stumbles across a cave filled with books and papers and hiding a room lined with crystals. It is…


Emmanuel's Book

By Pat Rodegast, Judith Stanton,

Book cover of Emmanuel's Book: A Manual for Living Comfortably in the Cosmos

I saved the best for last. In the mid-’80s, I was in a meditation group, and though we were centered around the teachings of Edgar Cayce, we read every new age and self-help book that came along. Far and away our favorite, with the most inspiring viewpoint, was Emmanuel’s Book. It was written a bit like poetry and I think there’s a reason for that. Emmanuel had a way of bypassing the human mind and speaking to us on a level deeper. As he liked to say: “Your life is none of your mind’s business.” Emmanuel has a way of putting you in contact with a knowing place within. As to whether or not you stay there, well that’s your personal mystical problem. 

Emmanuel's Book

By Pat Rodegast, Judith Stanton,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Emmanuel's Book as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The Pathwork of Self-Transformation

By Eva Pierrakos,

Book cover of The Pathwork of Self-Transformation

Mystical quests are all well and good, but most things, even our quests, can be fodder for self-delusion. That’s just how humans are built. Learning the particulars of how we’re built is a powerful way to lessen that delusion. Sooner or later, some actual self-work becomes necessary. I haven’t come across a more effective roadmap to the self than what’s found in the Pathwork Lectures of Eva Pierrakos. This is channeled work, the idea of which may make you punch your computer screen. But the information in these lectures, about the inner workings of the human psyche, seems spot on. This book contains a sampling from a few of the lectures, a sort of dim sum of psychological wisdom.

The Pathwork of Self-Transformation

By Eva Pierrakos,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Pathwork of Self-Transformation as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The Dragon and the George

By Gordon R. Dickson,

Book cover of The Dragon and the George

Twisting things around, The Dragon and the George throws the main character into the body of a dragon. I highly enjoyed the view of a human being thrown into an unknown type of body. The confusion and the discovery of strength and weaknesses made it fun to read. The tale has a small cast, and the story might remain a bit flat in ways, nevertheless, I found myself entertained by the setup and the unlikely band that the adventure brings together.

The Dragon and the George

By Gordon R. Dickson,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked The Dragon and the George as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Outlander

By Diana Gabaldon,

Book cover of Outlander

There’s a reason my Instagram profile says, ‘Mentally married to Jamie Fraser.’ ‘Cause it’s true!

Yes, he’s a fictional character. Yes, he’s a man written by a woman author. But neither matters when you escape into Jamie’s words—his declarations of fealty to his clan, his hatred for Black Jack Randall (boo, hiss), or his unflinching love of, Claire, his wife.

Gabaldon has created a mighty and fierce Scottish warrior who is intelligent, articulate, and oh so amazingly passionate! *waves fan frantically before face*

If I had to sum Jamie Fraser up in one word, it would be: loyal. 

Now, if only Claire would bugger off back through the stones and leave us be…

Outlander

By Diana Gabaldon,

Why should I read it?

18 authors picked Outlander as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The Rose Garden

By Susanna Kearsley,

Book cover of The Rose Garden

The main character of this novel travels back in time to 18th century Cornwall. The time-travelling element is beautifully done and swept me from the present to the past seamlessly and with such intrigue that I felt like I was struggling to adjust to the differences of the past with the heroine. The ambiance of medieval times stays with me and helped inspire me as I wrote my time travel book.

The Rose Garden

By Susanna Kearsley,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Rose Garden as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

When Eva's film star sister Katrina dies, she leaves California and returns to Cornwall, where they spent their childhood summers, to scatter Katrina's ashes and in doing so return her to the place where she belongs. But Eva must also confront the ghosts from her own past, as well as those from a time long before her own. For the house where she so often stayed as a child is home not only to her old friends the Halletts, but also to the people who had lived there in the eighteenth century. When Eva finally accepts that she is able…

Jackie & Me

By Dan Gutman,

Book cover of Jackie & Me

Kids who love the minutiae of sport - collecting the cards, following the stats, learning the teams and their star players - are often drawn to history as well. Dan Gutman gets this, and the Baseball Card Adventures is a brilliant series for giving young readers a way into a nuanced US history. In Jackie and Me, the hero, Stosh, is thrown out of Little League for attacking a pitcher who mocked his Polish heritage - “You know you can’t hit me, Stoshack. Because you’re a big, slow, ugly, dumb Polack!” Back at school, Stosh elects to write a book report on Jackie Robinson, and uses his magical baseball card to travel back in time. Stosh experiences Robinson’s first Major League game and the breaking of the color bar in baseball, finding a new perspective on difference and discrimination. Gutman writes colorful dialogue that kids really respond to, and…

Jackie & Me

By Dan Gutman,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Jackie & Me as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


To Say Nothing of the Dog

By Connie Willis,

Book cover of To Say Nothing of the Dog: Or How We Found the Bishop's Bird Stump at Last

Connie Willis and Kage Baker are, in my mind, kindred spirits. Both are outstanding in their ability to capture human nature, both in its glory and with its pants down. And with sparkling humor. I love many of Willis’s books but this little one is so fun, clever, and intriguing that it has to be my favorite.

It also features time travellers - British historians from the future who are documenting historical events while trying desperately not step on that one butterfly that destroys history.

This book is doubly funny because it is inspired by an equally hilarious novel by Jerome K. Jerome entitled Three Men in a Boat, To Say Nothing of the Dog. Victorian romantic misadventures with a bad case of time lag.

To Say Nothing of the Dog

By Connie Willis,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked To Say Nothing of the Dog as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Ned Henry is a time-travelling historian who specialises in the mid-20th century - currently engaged in researching the bombed-out Coventry Cathedral. He's also made so many drops into the past that he's suffering from a dangerously advanced case of 'time-lag'.

Unfortunately for Ned, an emergency dash to Victorian England is required and he's the only available historian. But Ned's time-lag is so bad that he's not sure what the errand is - which is bad news since, if he fails, history could unravel around him...


Here

By Richard McGuire,

Book cover of Here

This book is a great introduction to the “not-Marvel-or-DC” branch of graphic novels. Using nonlinear, overlapping panels, Here tells the story of a single point in space throughout the history of time. It flips from a midcentury living room to a primordial swamp, to a 23rd-century history exhibit, and everywhere in between. 

Of course, the real story of any space is the lives of the people and animals that inhabit it. Through the fragments of conversation and clips of action in Here, you’ll start thinking about the fleeting beauty and heartbreak that exist, existed, and will continue to exist on your own here.

Here

By Richard McGuire,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Here as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


5 book lists we think you will like!

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