The best books about weddings

3 authors have picked their favorite books about weddings and why they recommend each book.

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Dial A for Aunties

By Jesse Q. Sutanto,

Book cover of Dial A for Aunties

You would think a book in which a woman accidentally kills the man who tried to date-rape her and enlists her mother to help hide the body would be a gritty, intense thriller or a thought-provoking work of literary fiction full of social commentary. Sutanto turns this premise into a comedy about intergenerational female bonding, and it freakin’ works. Meddlin Chan’s manslaughter and cover-up take place against the bubbly backdrop of a Chinese-Indonesian resort wedding and a reconnection with her first love. What even is this book’s genre? Crime? Romance? Chick lit? Whatever it is, I laughed out loud through the whole thing.

Dial A for Aunties

By Jesse Q. Sutanto,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Dial A for Aunties as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

"Sutanto brilliantly infuses comedy and culture into the unpredictable rom-com/murder mystery mashup as Meddy navigates familial duty, possible arrest and a groomzilla. I laughed out loud and you will too.”—USA Today (four-star review)

“A hilarious, heartfelt romp of a novel about—what else?—accidental murder and the bond of family. This book had me laughing aloud within its first five pages… Utterly clever, deeply funny, and altogether charming, this book is sure to be one of the best of the year!”—Emily Henry, New York Times bestselling author of Beach Read

One of NPR's Best Books of 2021!

One of PopSugar’s "42 Books…

Who am I?

When people ask what kind of books I like to read, I can’t answer with a genre. As a kid, I’d come home from the library with mysteries, Westerns, fantasies, non-fiction books, and comic books in the same stack. I’ve always liked books that introduce me to fun characters, take these characters on fantastical adventures, make me laugh at least a little, and leave me with a sense of hope and triumph. They can be anything from cheesy romcoms to dark thrillers to complicated biographies. This is reflected in my fantasy series, Thalia’s Musings, which has been praised for its realistic treatment of abuse and also compared to Friends.


I wrote...

A Snag in the Tapestry: Thalia's Musings Volume 1

By Amethyst Marie,

Book cover of A Snag in the Tapestry: Thalia's Musings Volume 1

What is my book about?

Thalia is the Muse of Comedy. She doesn’t affect real life with her powers the way the Twelve Olympians do. She spends her days making mortal playwrights jump through hoops in exchange for comedic inspiration, and totally not flirting with the god Apollo. But when Thalia helps Apollo raise a cursed nymph from the dead, the Fates want to test her limits. Thalia takes the Fates’ tests in stride with the same glib, bubbly snark that she brings to the Olympian Court’s drama—until her sister becomes a target for Zeus’s attention and Hera’s vengeance, and Thalia’s growing powers may be the only thing that can protect her.

Cut to the Quick

By Kate Ross,

Book cover of Cut to the Quick

Kate Ross's books are unique in her choice of protagonist—outwardly a self-obsessed dandy rather than a hero—and in her deftness at creating the classic whodunit.

Although Julian Kestrel's ancestry is a bit vague, he clearly moves among the upper class with ease. After rescuing a young lord from a gaming hell, he is invited to a country house party. Unfortunately, he wakes up next to the body of a beautiful but very dead woman.

The only thing disappointing about this series is its shortness. The author passed away prematurely after writing only four books.

Cut to the Quick

By Kate Ross,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Cut to the Quick as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

England in the 1820s is the setting for this period mystery, which introduces the detective, Julian Kestrel. He finds the corpse of an attractive woman in his bed during an elegant country weekend at a friend's estate. He sets out to discover which of his hosts is a killer.

Who am I?

I have been a mystery fan all my life and an avid reader of Regency fiction—from the mystery authors I’ve recommended to early Regency romance writers, including Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer. When I visited England a few years ago, I dragged my travel companion to all the Regency landmarks left standing and nearly missed a tour bus because I just had to see a Regency assembly room where their dances were held! When I switched from writing fantasy (under the pen name Ally Shields) to writing historical mysteries in 2019, I spent hundreds of hours devouring non-fiction books on this fascinating period of Prince George’s regency (1811-1820).


I wrote...

The Dead Betray None

By Janet L. Buck,

Book cover of The Dead Betray None

What is my book about?

England, 1811. Lucien, Viscount Ware, has recently returned from four years of spying for England on the Continent. Finding themselves restless in the world of the haut ton, he and his fellow agent Andrew Sherbourne agree to secret spy work for the Crown at home and are given the task of locating a stolen code, the key to unlocking Napoleon's war documents. 

Lady Anne Ashburn comes to London to retrieve her cousin's love letters from a blackmailer. Lucien and Lady Anne come face-to-face over a dead body at the Christmastide Ball. What follows—the risks they take, the intrusion of a notorious crime lord, society gossip, and good intentions gone awry—sends them spiraling into danger and potential disaster for England’s war effort.

Murder with Peacocks

By Donna Andrews,

Book cover of Murder with Peacocks

Zany family members and weddings gone wrong provide page-turning laughs in the first book in the Meg Lanslow series. The heroine is smart, funny, and… a blacksmith. The small-town shenanigans just keep coming in this laugh-out-loud mystery, but the heart comes from the familial relationships. (No peacocks are harmed in the making of this mystery, but they do provide plenty of laughs.)

Murder with Peacocks

By Donna Andrews,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Murder with Peacocks as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Hectic plans for three family weddings in one summer are made even more hectic by murder.

Who am I?

I’ve been addicted to reading and writing mystery novels since I picked up my first Nancy Drew. But in addition to a good puzzle, I also love a good laugh and grew up watching classic screwball comedies. I’ve written a dozen funny cozy mysteries now with more in the works. I hope you enjoy the books on this list as much as I have!


I wrote...

Big Shot: A Small Town Cozy Mystery

By Kirsten Weiss,

Book cover of Big Shot: A Small Town Cozy Mystery

What is my book about?

Hi. I’m Alice. The number one secret to my success as a bodyguard? Staying under the radar. But when a public disaster blew up my career and my reputation, my perfect, solo life took a hard left turn to small-town Nowhere, Nevada. And to bodies. Lots of dead bodies…

Book cover of The List of Things That Will Not Change

Bea is a kid with big feelings who’s navigating major changes. After her parents’ divorce, she finds stability in a list of constants: that each of her parents will always love her; that she’ll always have a home with each of them; that they are still a family.

I felt Bea’s waves of elation and anger so intensely that some moments made me feel like my heart might burst. Ultimately, the love and support she receives from the adults in her life helped me remember my own things that will not change.

The List of Things That Will Not Change

By Rebecca Stead,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked The List of Things That Will Not Change as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2020
Nominated for the Carnegie Medal

Sonia and I have a lot in common. Our parents are divorced. Our dads are gay. We both love barbecue potato chips. But she is different from me in at least one way: you can't tell how she's feeling just by looking at her. At all.

When Bea's dad and his wonderful partner, Jesse, decide to marry, it looks as if Bea's biggest wish is coming true: she's finally (finally!) going to have a sister.

They're both ten. They're both in fifth grade. Though they've never met, Bea…

Who am I?

As a shy, dreamy kid, I relied on middle-grade books to learn about the world and feel less alone. That’s why I eventually started writing them. Growing up can be hard. Being grown-up can, too. Fiction can thrill, educate, and stimulate, and I love it for those reasons. But sometimes, I want a book to assure me things are going to be okay. In case you’d forgotten that the world can be scary and unpredictable, the last couple of years probably reminded you. I continue to find comfort in middle-grade books that make my heart feel full, tender, and hopeful. I needed books like these back then, and still need them today.


I wrote...

Eden's Wish (Eden of the Lamp, Book 1)

By M. Tara Crowl,

Book cover of Eden's Wish (Eden of the Lamp, Book 1)

What is my book about?

All twelve years of Eden’s life have been spent inside an antique oil lamp. She lives like a princess inside her tiny, luxurious home, but to Eden, the lamp is nothing but a prison. She hates being a genie. All she wants, more than anything, is freedom. When she finds a gateway to Earth within the lamp, Eden takes her chance and enters the world she loves. And this time, she won't be sent back after three wishes.

Posing as the new kid at a California middle school, Eden quickly learns that this world isn’t perfect. Soon, she also finds herself in the middle of a centuries-old conflict between powerful immortals. To protect the lamp’s magic, Eden must decide where she truly belongs.

The Member of the Wedding

By Carson McCullers,

Book cover of The Member of the Wedding

“Haven’t you grown!“ is often a grown-up’s exclamation of delight in a teen’s growth spurt, but rarely do we see this from the teen’s view. It can be scary as well as exciting seeing your body change so rapidly, and I love McCullers description of Frankie’s worry that she will continue to grow at the current pace; then she will be a “freak” – a word that is likely to resonate with all adolescents. Frankie's private, unspoken fears taken place in the midst of a quintessentially social celebration and remind us how often teens, even when surrounded by joy and support, struggle with self doubt as to who they are and how they look.

The Member of the Wedding

By Carson McCullers,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Member of the Wedding as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

From the master of Southern Gothic, Carson McCullers's coming-of-age story like no other about a young girl's fascination with her brother's wedding.

Twelve-year-old Frankie is utterly, hopelessly bored with life until she hears about her older brother’s wedding. Bolstered by lively conversations with her family maid, Berenice, and her six-year-old cousin—not to mention her own unbridled imagination—Frankie takes on an overly active role in the wedding, hoping even to go, uninvited, on the honeymoon, so deep is her desire to be a member of something larger, more accepting than herself.

Who am I?

I learned to fear adolescence as a child, when my mother made predictions about how difficult I would be as a teen. Then, as a mother, I felt that old concern arise in me, that my warm, cuddly children would turn into feral teens bent on rejecting me. This was the point at which I became, as a psychologist, a student of adolescence. I write nonfiction books on adolescents, their parents and friends, their self-consciousness and self-doubt, as well as their resilience and intelligence. But creative fiction writing often leaps ahead of psychology, so I welcome the opportunity to offer my list of five wonderful novels about teens.  


I wrote...

The Teen Interpreter: A Guide to the Challenges and Joys of Raising Adolescents

By Terri Apter,

Book cover of The Teen Interpreter: A Guide to the Challenges and Joys of Raising Adolescents

What is my book about?

While they may not show it, teenagers rely on their parents’ curiosity, delight, and connection to guide them through this period of exuberant growth.

In The Teen Interpreter, psychologist Terri Apter looks into teens’ minds―minds that are experiencing powerful new emotions and awareness of the world around them―to show how parents can revitalize their relationship with their children. She illuminates the rapid neurological developments of a teen’s brain, along with their new, complex emotions, and offers strategies for disciplining unsafe actions constructively and empathetically. Apter includes up-to-the-moment case studies that shed light on the anxieties and vulnerabilities that today’s teens face, and she thoughtfully explores the positives and pitfalls of social media.

D'Vaughn and Kris Plan a Wedding

By Chencia C. Higgins,

Book cover of D'Vaughn and Kris Plan a Wedding

D'Vaughn and Kris Plan a Wedding reminds me of those mushy holiday movies my wife watches on loop at the close of each year. The love connection always begins with the couple physically bumping into each other. While D'Vaughn and Kris don't run into each other, they are randomly paired up on a dating show. An odd move for D'Vaughn, as she isn't out to her family, but because Kris is a hopeless romantic, I found myself rooting hard for the faux couple.

Watching D'Vaughn come into her authentic self and the two women support each other throughout the process reminds me that despite any family dynamic or even local legislation, the moment you decide to be in a committed relationship is the moment you become a team. A united front. Gay, straight, or otherwise, that's a universal theme that most of us can get behind. 

D'Vaughn and Kris Plan a Wedding

By Chencia C. Higgins,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked D'Vaughn and Kris Plan a Wedding as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A TODAY SHOW BEST ROMANCE PICK FROM NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING AUTHOR JASMINE GUILLORY

“In a romance featuring Black joy, plus-sized beauty, and Mexican pride, the conflicts are entirely believable, and not overly dramatic, and make for a thoroughly enjoyable read. It is fake dating at its best.” —Library Journal, starred review. 
 

D’Vaughn and Kris have six weeks to plan their dream wedding.

Their whole relationship is fake.

Instant I Do could be Kris Zavala’s big break. She’s right on the cusp of really making it as an influencer, so a stint on reality TV is the perfect chance to…

Who am I?

I'm an Emmy Award-winning writer, wife, and adoptive mother with an unapologetic passion for Black queer stories. I'm also an artist-activist who takes great pride in producing content that sparks honest dialogue and positive change. Life's complexities energize me, and, as a queer artist of color, I'm committed to reflecting these intricacies in my work. I write, produce video, and host allyship seminars as well as art as activism workshops for LGBTQ+ youth. If you're both inspired and entertained by layered depictions of BIPOC queer culture then please check out the recs in my Queer-tastic reading list. Enjoy!


I wrote...

Pum Pum Rock—There's No Place Like Homo

By Leslie Anne Frye-Thomas,

Book cover of Pum Pum Rock—There's No Place Like Homo

What is my book about?

Written in five parts, Pum Pum Rock—There's No Place Like Homo delves deep into orthodox Caribbean thinking. The story follows Natalia Higgins (Nate). The daughter of a diplomat, she's a teen of means; however, readers quickly learn that living as a homosexual in paradise comes with a hefty price.

Part coming of age and part romantic-thriller, Pum Pum Rock vacillates between Nate's formative years in Montego Bay and adult life in Los Angeles. Shrouded in themes of homophobia, mama-drama, and straight-up resilience, Nate's story gives readers an inside look at a cross-section of Black, lesbian life. From anti-LGBTQ+ laws and cultural norms to chosen family and the daily struggle to just be seen, Pum Pum Rock proves there truly is no place like homo.

The Ring Bearer

By Floyd Cooper,

Book cover of The Ring Bearer

The Ring Bearer is a celebration of a blended family. Jackson has a big job: he must carry the ring in his mother’s wedding ceremony. He’s nervous. What if he drops it? What if he trips? The simple action of this story is relatable for kids and, even more importantly, they will connect with the deeper fears Jackson faces—big changes, new family dynamics, and sharing love. Also, Floyd Cooper’s illustrations? Stunning.  

The Ring Bearer

By Floyd Cooper,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Ring Bearer as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Jackson's mama's getting married, and Jackson's going to be the ring bearer - but what if he trips? Or walks too slowly? Or drops the rings? And what about his new step-sister, Sophie? She's supposed to be the flower girl, but Jackson's not sure she's taking her job as seriously as she should. In a celebration of blended families, this heartwarming story, stunningly illustrated by the award-winning Floyd Cooper, is a perfect gift for any child who's nervous to walk down the aisle at a wedding.

Who am I?

When my sister got divorced, she and my nephew, Jordy, moved in with our parents. My mother was—and still is—a big music fan, and she decided to play the same music in her house that Jordy’s dad played in his. The music became a bridge; a way for Jordy to feel like he was at home in both places. I loved this and kept it tucked away for years before Here and There came to me. I feel passionate about helping kids find a way to feel safe and comfortable in themselves—no matter where they are or what they’re going through—and all the books on my list do this brilliantly.


I wrote...

Here and There

By Tamara Ellis Smith, Evelyn Daviddi (illustrator),

Book cover of Here and There

What is my book about?

After Ivan's parents separate, he has trouble finding joy at either of their homes until he discovers that the birds and music that he loves may be found in both places.

Delilah Green Doesn't Care

By Ashley Herring Blake,

Book cover of Delilah Green Doesn't Care

A gorgeous fun-filled small-town sapphic romance (lesbian and bisexual rep). Delilah is a struggling photographer in New York when she’s persuaded home to Bright Falls to photograph her estranged stepsister’s wedding. As well as fighting from a place of hurt with her stepsister Astrid, Delilah falls for Claire, Astrid’s BFF. 

The writing is sassy and smart and oh-so-much fun, but this is no pure rom-com. There’s depth to the characters, even the minor ones like Claire’s daughter Ruby, and her friend Iris. Delilah, too, isn’t the shallow don’t-care person of the title. She’s holding a world of hurt inside her brittle exterior. Layers are peeled back gradually, and the characters reveal themselves slowly, all inside some writing so shiny it sparkles. It’s pure, big-hearted romance that gives you all the feels as you romp to the happy ending.

Delilah Green Doesn’t Care is (so far) my favourite read of 2022,…

Delilah Green Doesn't Care

By Ashley Herring Blake,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Delilah Green Doesn't Care as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A clever and steamy queer romantic comedy about taking chances and accepting love—with all its complications—from the author of Astrid Parker Doesn't Fail.

Delilah Green swore she would never go back to Bright Falls—nothing is there for her but memories of a lonely childhood where she was little more than a burden to her cold and distant stepfamily. Her life is in New York, with her photography career finally gaining steam and her bed never empty. Sure, it’s a different woman every night, but that’s just fine with her.
 
When Delilah’s estranged stepsister, Astrid, pressures her into photographing her wedding…

Who am I?

I’ve been writing lesbian and sapphic stories for a couple of decades now, and over time, I’ve gravitated to stories that have something else going on as well as pure romance. Romance doesn’t evolve in a vacuum, and the setting, scenario, and supporting characters can all help shape the main characters’ romance. I love these fun-filled books that also carry a deeper side, whether it’s a subplot or the main story. That’s what I love to write and read, and I hope you enjoy these recommendations as much as I do.


I wrote...

The Number 94 Project

By Cheyenne Blue,

Book cover of The Number 94 Project

What is my book about?

When Jorgie’s uncle leaves her an old house in Melbourne, it’s a dream come true. Sure, No. 94 is falling apart, and she has to deal with her uncle’s eccentric friends thanks to his unusual Will. But she’ll do it up, sell it, and move on. But the quirky queer community of Gaylord Street is as enticing as Marta, her new next-door neighbour. Jorgie hasn’t counted on falling for Marta, who’s as embedded in Gaylord St as the concrete Jorgie’s ripping up.

A light lesbian romance about crumbling walls and learning where home really is.

The Plus One

By Sarah Archer,

Book cover of The Plus One

If sci-fi is not really your thing, worry not! Charming robots have crept into romance too and as a romance, The Plus One doesn’t disappoint. The robot love interest, Ethan, is everything a woman could look for—attentive, handsome, intelligent. But is he too good to be true? I loved how this book took a sci-fi trope and rewrote it for a romance reader, while still addressing some of the fundamental questions raised by AI, in this instance, not just “what is human?” but also “what is love?”

The Plus One

By Sarah Archer,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Plus One as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

'Refreshing and fun' Debbie Johnson 'Thoroughly entertaining' Love Reading 'You will end up wondering if robotic boyfriends might be better than trawling through Tinder' Heat 'Romantic, intriguing and absolutely hilarious' The Courier

'A fresh take on a common romance plot and we love it' Yahoo's Top Books for March

Dating is hard. Being dateless at your perfect sister's wedding is harder.

Meet Kelly. A brilliant but socially awkward robotics engineer desperately seeking a wedding date...

Meet Ethan. Intelligent, gorgeous, brings out the confidence Kelly didn't know she had and ... not technically human. (But no one needs to know that.)…


Who am I?

As an avid consumer of science fiction, I’ve always been a fan of artificial intelligence in all its forms. Whether it is HAL from 2001: A Space Odyssey or Data from Star Trek robots and computer minds, as well as genetically engineered humans such as the replicants from Blade Runner have always fascinated me. So much so that my first science fiction series, The Nahx Invasions, tells the story of a race of artificially created humanoids—The Nahx. Often in sci-fi, the robots and other AI are either positioned as villains or sidekicks. I wanted to put the AI front and center as the heroes and the books I’ve selected do the same.


I wrote...

Zero Repeat Forever, Volume 1

By Gabrielle S. Prendergast,

Book cover of Zero Repeat Forever, Volume 1

What is my book about?

When an invasion of murderous creatures signals the end of the world, a wayward teenage girl must band together with a dangerous ally if she’s to have a chance at survival in this high-stakes, heart-wrenching story of destruction, hope, and freedom. He has no voice or name, only a rank, Eighth. He doesn’t know the details of the mission, only the directives that hum in his mind. Dart the humans. Leave them where they fall. His job is to protect his Offside. Let her do the shooting. Until a human kills her.


Sixteen-year-old Raven is at summer camp when the terrifying armored Nahx invade. Isolated in the wilderness, Raven and her fellow campers can only stay put. Await rescue. Raven doesn’t like feeling helpless, but what choice does she have? Then a Nahx kills her boyfriend. Thrown together in a violent, unfamiliar world, Eighth and Raven should feel only hate and fear. But when Raven is injured and Eighth deserts his unit, their lives depend on trusting each other.

Book cover of The Spanish Love Deception

As someone who spent a number of years working in a big office in New York City (and kinda hating it), the “big city office atmosphere” in this story really spoke to me. Luckily, there is at least a brief vacation where the characters escape the grind. Best of all, when they return to the city, they can appreciate what’s romantic about it in so many new and wonderful ways.

The Spanish Love Deception

By Elena Armas,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Spanish Love Deception as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER
WINNER OF THE GOODREADS CHOICE AWARDS DEBUT NOVEL OF THE YEAR.
A BOOKTOK SENSATION.

A wedding in Spain. The most infuriating man. Three days to convince your family you're actually in love. . .

Catalina Martin desperately needs a date to her sister's wedding. Especially when her little white lie about her American boyfriend has spiralled out of control. Now everyone she knows - including her ex-boyfriend and his fiancee - will be there.

She only has four weeks to find someone willing to cross the Atlantic for her and aid in her deception. NYC to…

Who am I?

As someone who’s been born and raised in and around the suburbs of Manhattan, I have a love-hate relationship with the city. I crave the excitement it offers but then gets frustrated by its drawbacks- the crowds, the dirt, the noise, the expense, the pressure. But then you crack open the pages of a romance story, and the allure of Manhattan and the surrounding boroughs is undeniable. Anything is possible in New York City.


I wrote...

That's Not a Thing

By Jacqueline Friedland,

Book cover of That's Not a Thing

What is my book about?

Meredith Altman’s engagement to Wesley Latner ended in spectacular disaster—one that shattered her completely. Years have passed since then, and now she’s about to marry Aaron Rapp, a former Ivy League football player and baby-saving doctor. As they celebrate their engagement at a new TriBeCa hotspot, Meredith is stunned to find the restaurant owner is none other than Wesley, the man she is still secretly trying to forget.

When Meredith learns that Wesley has been diagnosed with ALS, her feelings about their past become all the more confusing. As she spends more time with Wesley and is pulled further under his spell, she discovers what kind of man her new fiancé really is—and what kind of woman she wants to be.

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