The best books about Jupiter

Many authors have picked their favorite books about Jupiter and why they recommend each book.

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Impact Jupiter

By David H. Levy,

Book cover of Impact Jupiter: The Crash of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

This book is the story of the biggest collision of space objects mankind has ever seen – literally – told by the man who saw it coming. In 1993 Levy was working with astronomers Carolyn and Eugene Shoemaker at a mountain-top observatory in California when they spotted a comet that had been captured by Jupiter’s enormous gravity and sucked into orbit around the Solar System’s biggest planet. Levy and the Shoemakers predicted that pieces of the comet would soon strike Jupiter’s surface with almost unimaginable force – which prompted skepticism among some astronomers. But sure enough, in 1994 the comet fragments hit Jupiter’s surface with the collective force of a 50 million megaton bomb – thousands of times the energy of all the nuclear weapons on Earth. The event made us realize that if it could happen to Jupiter, it could happen to Earth – and that we’d better take…


Who am I?

In 2016 I was enjoying an early morning cup of coffee on my back porch in Arizona when an eerie red light lit up the dark sky, followed seconds later by a tremendous distant explosion that rattled my cup and set my dogs howling. As a soldier and journalist, I had seen all kinds of human and natural catastrophes and mayhem, but never anything like this. Later I was astonished to learn that this event, which was seen as far away as Texas, was caused by a small asteroid the size of a refrigerator that had exploded in the atmosphere with the energy equivalent of a million pounds of TNT. I wanted to find out more – and I did.


I wrote...

Fire in the Sky: Cosmic Collisions, Killer Asteroids, and the Race to Defend Earth

By Gordon L. Dillow,

Book cover of Fire in the Sky: Cosmic Collisions, Killer Asteroids, and the Race to Defend Earth

What is my book about?

From its earliest formation our planet has been routinely bombarded by space rocks large and small. In fact, collisions between small asteroids and Earth are a daily occurrence. Fortunately, most of the small ones burn up in the atmosphere, and the big ones don’t come around very often. But the question isn’t if another large asteroid or comet will strike the Earth with catastrophic consequences -- the only question is when. It could be a thousand years from now, or it could be next Tuesday. Fire in the Sky takes an accessible and sometimes light-hearted look at the history of these space invaders -- including the six-mile wide asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs 66 million years ago -- as well as the ongoing efforts to identify, and if possible deflect, large asteroids that may threaten our planet in the future.

Adam's Apple and the Infinite Regress

By L.G. Keltner,

Book cover of Adam's Apple and the Infinite Regress

This book was born because of the A to Z Challenge. I've been a fan of this author for years, having read other books and her blog. "Ditz" is a fantastic character right off the bat. Bibble is a villain who is easy to dislike.

Excellent and imaginative alien races appear in this story. Stephen Fry would be an excellent narrator, especially for the part about the Jupiter Station facts. Adam made me crave cake. The book had me pondering what it would look like if my life flashed before my eyes.

This novella is sci-fi humor with a touch of romance and a quest for justice.


Who am I?

I have taken part in the April Blogging from A to Z Challenge #atozchallenge since 2014. I volunteered on A to Z founder Arlee's group early on. I was elevated to co-host in 2017 and became the Team Captain in 2018. In 2019, I ran the "#AtoZChallenge Book Reviews, Tour, and Blog Hop!" My own book, Writing Book Reviews As An Author: Inspiration To Make It Easier, was created because of the challenge. I used my method of writing book reviews, broken down alphabetically, to create a month of blog posts. Then compiled those posts into a book. Authors depend on book reviews, but struggle to write them for others.


I wrote...

Writing Book Reviews as an Author: Inspiration to Make It Easier

By J Lenni Dorner,

Book cover of Writing Book Reviews as an Author: Inspiration to Make It Easier

What is my book about?

This book aims to provide inspiration to encourage people to write more book reviews. It is written for authors, though any reader can benefit.

Inherit the Stars

By James P. Hogan,

Book cover of Inherit the Stars

Another book I read when I was young and never forgot, James P. Hogan's debut novel takes us once again to the Moon. Inspired by Clarke's 2001, it tells a much different story in which Earth's Moon originally orbited another planet entirely. When its first planet was destroyed, the debris became the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, and the Moon was captured by Earth's gravity. And how did we figure this out? Because our own astronauts exploring the Moon find a long-dead, spacesuited astronaut who is very human but has technology beyond ours. Reverse-engineering that technology puts us closer to exploring beyond our solar system, and it turns out the captured Moon also had an impact on our ancient history. I love this book for its grand, compelling ideas.


Who am I?

I always wanted to work with space systems, and my first assignment in the US Air Force exceeded my expectations in that regard. As chief of bioenvironmental engineering at the AF Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, I kept test programs safe for everything from small satellite thrusters to huge solid rocket motors, and eventually found myself on the support team for Space Shuttle landings, the flight readiness review committee for the first launch of a Pegasus rocket, and monitoring Titan rocket launches. During that assignment, I first thought of writing a story about environmental engineers working to keep a lunar colony alive: the genesis of Walking on the Sea of Clouds.


I wrote...

Walking on the Sea of Clouds

By Gray Rinehart,

Book cover of Walking on the Sea of Clouds

What is my book about?

Survival and Sacrifice on the Lunar Frontier!

Before permanent lunar encampments can ever be built, the first settlers have to set up shop and eke out an existence on the Moon. Walking on the Sea of Clouds is the story of such pioneers: two couples determined not just to survive, but to thrive, in this near-future technological drama about the risks people will take, the emergencies they’ll face, and the sacrifices they’ll make as members of the first commercial lunar colony. In the end, one will leave, one will stay, one will hesitate… and one will die so another can live.

Seventh Grade vs. the Galaxy

By Joshua S. Levy,

Book cover of Seventh Grade vs. the Galaxy

Perfect for embracing your inner space adventure geek. Seventh Grade vs. The Galaxy grabs your hand and pulls you into deep space for a grand, fun, and funny star-sweeping good time. There’s excitement, cool spaceships, scary alien races, and an awesome group of kids that suddenly finds themselves in over their heads. You won’t believe how quickly you zip through this book. You just won’t want to put it down.


Who am I?

I’ve always described myself as a lifelong geek. I grew up reading King Arthur legends, watching Star Wars and The NeverEnding Story until I could recite every line, running secret science experiments in my room, and burying my nose in every book I could get my hands on. As I grew, I came to appreciate that there are many different varieties of geeks. Being a geek generally means that you have a true, deep passion for something, and you pursue it unapologetically and with joy. So I wanted to give book recommendations that will appeal to whatever kind of geek you consider yourself.


I wrote...

This Last Adventure

By Ryan Dalton,

Book cover of This Last Adventure

What is my book about?

In This Last Adventure, a boy uses storytelling and shared fantasies to save his grandfather’s memories from Alzheimer’s. After Grandpa is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, the hero that Archie’s known all his life starts disappearing. Using Grandpa’s old journal entries as inspiration, he creates role-playing fantasies with epic quests for them to tackle together–helping Grandpa to stay in touch with his fading memories.

But there’s a limit to the power of the fantasies. And not all the memories in the journal are happy. When Archie learns a secret about Grandpa’s past, he questions everything he thought he knew about his hero. As Grandpa’s condition worsens, Archie must come to terms with what he’s losing and decide what it means to live a life worth remembering.

Asteroids

By Curtis Peebles,

Book cover of Asteroids: A History

This book is an entertaining look at the history of mankind’s knowledge about asteroids, which began in 1801 with the discovery of the 600-mile wide asteroid Ceres. Today more than half a million asteroids in our Solar System have been identified, while billions more (mostly small ones) are still waiting to be discovered. The vast majority pose no threat to Earth, but they are fascinating anyway. There are asteroids shaped like giant dog bones, asteroids that resemble human skulls, asteroids that have smaller asteroids orbiting around them as they orbit around the sun. Peebles’ book tells you everything you need to know about these space rocks – and more things that you’ll want to know. A thoroughly enjoyable book.


Who am I?

In 2016 I was enjoying an early morning cup of coffee on my back porch in Arizona when an eerie red light lit up the dark sky, followed seconds later by a tremendous distant explosion that rattled my cup and set my dogs howling. As a soldier and journalist, I had seen all kinds of human and natural catastrophes and mayhem, but never anything like this. Later I was astonished to learn that this event, which was seen as far away as Texas, was caused by a small asteroid the size of a refrigerator that had exploded in the atmosphere with the energy equivalent of a million pounds of TNT. I wanted to find out more – and I did.


I wrote...

Fire in the Sky: Cosmic Collisions, Killer Asteroids, and the Race to Defend Earth

By Gordon L. Dillow,

Book cover of Fire in the Sky: Cosmic Collisions, Killer Asteroids, and the Race to Defend Earth

What is my book about?

From its earliest formation our planet has been routinely bombarded by space rocks large and small. In fact, collisions between small asteroids and Earth are a daily occurrence. Fortunately, most of the small ones burn up in the atmosphere, and the big ones don’t come around very often. But the question isn’t if another large asteroid or comet will strike the Earth with catastrophic consequences -- the only question is when. It could be a thousand years from now, or it could be next Tuesday. Fire in the Sky takes an accessible and sometimes light-hearted look at the history of these space invaders -- including the six-mile wide asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs 66 million years ago -- as well as the ongoing efforts to identify, and if possible deflect, large asteroids that may threaten our planet in the future.

The Jupiter Stone

By Owen Paul Lewis,

Book cover of The Jupiter Stone

With simple, colorful drawings and age-appropriate text, author-illustrator Lewis relays the amazing journey of a Jupiter-striped stone through the cosmos, including its brief billion-year stop on Earth. I absolutely adore this book and use it as a mentor text in my classes to show new and experienced writers how children’s picture books can touch the soul. Working with only 32 pages and minimal words, Lewis captures the wonder of the universe and the never-ending story of where we, as humans, fit into the heavens. The twist at the end is pure magic.


Who am I?

Fairy tales were my first love but I didn’t discover the true magic of children’s picture books until I left my 25-year career as an attorney to enter an MFA program. Wow, was I amazed. Picture books—books in which pictures tell an integral part of the story—not only create an instant connection between reader and little listener but stay with us into adulthood as memories. With this insight, I dove into the genre to discover what distinguishes picture books that are read and reread from those that fade. The answer turns out to be—tales that engender awe and wonder, yarns with heart, and narratives about friendship and kindness. Those are the stories that stay with us forever.


I wrote...

Dario and the Whale

By Cheryl Lawton Malone, Bistra Masseva (illustrator),

Book cover of Dario and the Whale

What is my book about?

When Dario and his mother move to Cape Cod from Brazil, Dario has a hard time making friends because he doesnt speak English well. But one day Dario meets someone else who has just arrived in New England, and he doesn’t speak English at all—a right whale! Inspired by the author’s real-life encounter with a whale, Dario and the Whale (Albert Whitman) captures the heart-warming efforts of a migrant boy to make friends and fit in. 

Dario is the Massachusetts selection for the Library of Congress 2021 Great Reads From Great Places award, a 2019 Massachusetts Book honoree, and recipient of numerous starred reviews including Shelf-Awareness.

Bookshelves related to Jupiter