10 books like Impact Jupiter

By David H. Levy,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like Impact Jupiter. Shepherd is a community of 7,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Near-Earth Objects

By Donald K. Yeomans,

Book cover of Near-Earth Objects: Finding Them Before They Find Us

The subtitle of this book says it all. As a planetary scientist for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Yeomans’ job was to plot the courses of known and newly-discovered NEOs – that is, asteroids and comets that in space terms come close to Earth’s orbit – and determine if and when they might be on a collision course with our planet. With more than 25,000 known NEOs orbiting around up there, it’s not an easy task. But Yeomans makes the crucial point: it’s not the space rocks we know about that pose the biggest threat, but rather the thousands and thousands of large near-Earth asteroids we don’t know about that are the greatest danger. It’s not like the movie Armageddon; it would take years to develop a space mission to deflect or destroy an incoming asteroid, so it’s crucial that we find and track them – as Yeomans says, before…

Near-Earth Objects

By Donald K. Yeomans,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Near-Earth Objects as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Of all the natural disasters that could befall us, only an Earth impact by a large comet or asteroid has the potential to end civilization in a single blow. Yet these near-Earth objects also offer tantalizing clues to our solar system's origins, and someday could even serve as stepping-stones for space exploration. In this book, Donald Yeomans introduces readers to the science of near-Earth objects--its history, applications, and ongoing quest to find near-Earth objects before they find us. In its course around the sun, the Earth passes through a veritable shooting gallery of millions of nearby comets and asteroids. One…


Asteroid Hunters

By Carrie Nugent,

Book cover of Asteroid Hunters

This book is about asteroid hunters, written by an asteroid hunter – and she clearly loves her work. Nugent is an assistant professor of computational physics and planetary science at Olin College and worked on NASA’s Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE), which discovered hundreds of Potential Hazardous Objects – asteroids and comets – that could someday threaten Earth. You don’t have to be a scientist to enjoy this book. Nugent patiently walks us through the process of finding and tracking potentially dangerous space rocks with skill and passion for her subject.

Asteroid Hunters

By Carrie Nugent,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Asteroid Hunters as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Dr Carrie Nugent is an asteroid hunter - one of the select group of scientists working diligently to map our cosmic neighbourhood. For the first time ever we are reaching the point where we may be able to prevent a natural disaster resulting from an asteroid collision. Nugent will delve into the impact asteroids have had in the past: the extinction of the dinosaurs, the earth-sized hole Shoemaker-Levy 9 left in Jupiter just a few years ago, how the surprise hit on Chelyabinsk in Russia could have started a war and unlucky Ms Anne Hodges - the only person (that…


Asteroids

By Curtis Peebles,

Book cover of Asteroids: A History

This book is an entertaining look at the history of mankind’s knowledge about asteroids, which began in 1801 with the discovery of the 600-mile wide asteroid Ceres. Today more than half a million asteroids in our Solar System have been identified, while billions more (mostly small ones) are still waiting to be discovered. The vast majority pose no threat to Earth, but they are fascinating anyway. There are asteroids shaped like giant dog bones, asteroids that resemble human skulls, asteroids that have smaller asteroids orbiting around them as they orbit around the sun. Peebles’ book tells you everything you need to know about these space rocks – and more things that you’ll want to know. A thoroughly enjoyable book.

Asteroids

By Curtis Peebles,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Asteroids as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Asteroids suggest images of a catastrophic impact with Earth, triggering infernos, tidal waves, famine, and death - but these scenarios have obscured the larger story of how asteroids have been discovered and studied. During the past two centuries, the quest for knowledge about asteroids has involved eminent scientists and amateur astronomers, patient research and sudden intuition, advanced technology and the simplest of telescopes, newspaper headlines and Cold War secrets. Today, researchers have named and identified the mineral composition of these objects. They range in size from 33 feet to 580 miles wide and most are found in a belt between…


Mining the Sky

By John S. Lewis,

Book cover of Mining the Sky: Untold Riches From the Asteroids, Comets and Planets

This book is about the positive side of Near-Earth Objects – that is, they can benefit mankind as well as threaten it. Lewis explains how asteroids are chock full of valuable minerals – iron, nickel, platinum, iridium, and so on – that are either rare or difficult and messy to extract on Earth. Lewis persuasively argues that it’s not just possible but almost inevitable that Earthlings will eventually start extracting those space rock riches -- not so much to bring them back to Earth but to use them for manufacturing industries in space, thus sparing our planet from much of the pollution that threatens our world. It’s not just futuristic day-dreaming; already private companies are spending big money to develop space-mining technologies. The bottom line of this fascinating book is that there’s gold in them thar hills – or rather, in them thar far reaches of space. And sooner than…

Mining the Sky

By John S. Lewis,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Mining the Sky as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

While we worry over the depletion of the earth's natural resources, the pollution of our planet, and the challenges presented by the earth's growing population, billions of dollars worth of metals, fuels, and life-sustaining substances await us in nearby space. In this visionary book, noted planetary scientist John S. Lewis explains how we can mine these precious metals from the asteroids, comets, and planets in our own solar system for use in space construction projects. And this is just one of the possibilities. Join John S. Lewis as he contemplates milking the moons of Mars for water and hollowing out…


Adam's Apple and the Infinite Regress

By L.G. Keltner,

Book cover of Adam's Apple and the Infinite Regress

This book was born because of the A to Z Challenge. I've been a fan of this author for years, having read other books and her blog. "Ditz" is a fantastic character right off the bat. Bibble is a villain who is easy to dislike.

Excellent and imaginative alien races appear in this story. Stephen Fry would be an excellent narrator, especially for the part about the Jupiter Station facts. Adam made me crave cake. The book had me pondering what it would look like if my life flashed before my eyes.

This novella is sci-fi humor with a touch of romance and a quest for justice.

Adam's Apple and the Infinite Regress

By L.G. Keltner,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Adam's Apple and the Infinite Regress as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Inherit the Stars

By James P. Hogan,

Book cover of Inherit the Stars

Another book I read when I was young and never forgot, James P. Hogan's debut novel takes us once again to the Moon. Inspired by Clarke's 2001, it tells a much different story in which Earth's Moon originally orbited another planet entirely. When its first planet was destroyed, the debris became the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, and the Moon was captured by Earth's gravity. And how did we figure this out? Because our own astronauts exploring the Moon find a long-dead, spacesuited astronaut who is very human but has technology beyond ours. Reverse-engineering that technology puts us closer to exploring beyond our solar system, and it turns out the captured Moon also had an impact on our ancient history. I love this book for its grand, compelling ideas.

Inherit the Stars

By James P. Hogan,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Inherit the Stars as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The man on the moon was dead. They called him Charlie. He had big eyes, abundant body hair, and fairly long nostrils. His skeletal body was found clad in a bright red spacesuit, hidden in a rocky grave. They didn’t know who he was, how he got there, or what had killed him. All they knew was that his corpse was 50 thousand years old - and that meant this man had somehow lived long before he ever could have existed.


Seventh Grade vs. the Galaxy

By Joshua S. Levy,

Book cover of Seventh Grade vs. the Galaxy

Perfect for embracing your inner space adventure geek. Seventh Grade vs. The Galaxy grabs your hand and pulls you into deep space for a grand, fun, and funny star-sweeping good time. There’s excitement, cool spaceships, scary alien races, and an awesome group of kids that suddenly finds themselves in over their heads. You won’t believe how quickly you zip through this book. You just won’t want to put it down.

Seventh Grade vs. the Galaxy

By Joshua S. Levy,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Seventh Grade vs. the Galaxy as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Percy Jackson meets Star Trek

PSS 118 is just your typical school―except that it's a rickety old spaceship orbiting Ganymede, a moon of Jupiter. Jack's dad used to be the science teacher, until he got fired for tinkering with the ship. Now Jack just wants to get through the last day of school without anything else going wrong.

But when the school is mysteriously attacked, Jack discovers that his dad has built humanity's first light-speed engine―and given Jack control of it. To save the ship, Jack catapults it hundreds of light-years away . . . and right into the clutches…


The Jupiter Stone

By Owen Paul Lewis,

Book cover of The Jupiter Stone

With simple, colorful drawings and age-appropriate text, author-illustrator Lewis relays the amazing journey of a Jupiter-striped stone through the cosmos, including its brief billion-year stop on Earth. I absolutely adore this book and use it as a mentor text in my classes to show new and experienced writers how children’s picture books can touch the soul. Working with only 32 pages and minimal words, Lewis captures the wonder of the universe and the never-ending story of where we, as humans, fit into the heavens. The twist at the end is pure magic.

The Jupiter Stone

By Owen Paul Lewis,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Jupiter Stone as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This striking picturebook chronicles the journey of a small striped stone-which bears an uncanny resemblance to the planet Jupiter-from its beginning in the heavens to its landing on primordial Earth to its return to space. Award-winning author/illustrator Paul Owen Lewis has created a simple yet never-ending story which will inspire more questions than it answers. First new book from author of STORM BOY in six years!Will inspire readers to gaze at the night sky and wonder.Abundant cross-curricular possibilities.


What Miss Mitchell Saw

By Hayley Barrett, Diana Sudyka (illustrator),

Book cover of What Miss Mitchell Saw

This book does a great job of capturing the wonder of the stars. In lyrical language and with absolutely stunning illustrations, What Miss Mitchell Saw will capture the reader’s interest right from the cover. This picture book biography delves into the early days of one of our most brilliant astronomers, Maria Mitchell. Budding scientists and astronomers alike, or anyone who just likes to wonder about the mysteries of space, will love this book.

What Miss Mitchell Saw

By Hayley Barrett, Diana Sudyka (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked What Miss Mitchell Saw as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Discover the amazing true story of Maria Mitchell, America's first professional female astronomer.

Every evening, from the time she was a child, Maria Mitchell stood on her rooftop with her telescope and swept the sky. And then one night she saw something unusual-a comet no one had ever seen before! Miss Mitchell's extraordinary discovery made her famous the world over and paved the way for her to become America's first professional female astronomer.

Gorgeously illustrated by Diana Sudyka, this moving picture book about a girl from humble beginnings who became a star in the field of astronomy is sure to…


Lucifer's Hammer

By Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle,

Book cover of Lucifer's Hammer

Believable characters, a sufficient backstory to endear you towards the main protagonists, and a well-developed plot that doesn't rely on too many overused tropes in the post-apocalyptic genre.

A number of the characteristics in this post-apocalyptic tale will strike familiar cords, but that would actually be the work of a long chain of often inferior copycat authors who are mimicking previous themes.

Lucifer's Hammer

By Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Lucifer's Hammer as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

“The first satisfying end-of-the-world novel in years . . . an ultimate one . . . massively entertaining.”—Cleveland Plain-Dealer

The gigantic comet had slammed into Earth, forging earthquakes a thousand times too powerful to measure on the Richter scale, tidal waves thousands of feet high. Cities were turned into oceans; oceans turned into steam. It was the beginning of a new Ice Age and the end of civilization.

But for the terrified men and women chance had saved, it was also the dawn of a new struggle for survival—a struggle more dangerous and challenging than any they had ever known.…


5 book lists we think you will like!

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