100 books like Rewriting Adam

By Connie Mae Inglis,

Here are 100 books that Rewriting Adam fans have personally recommended if you like Rewriting Adam. Shepherd is a community of 10,000+ authors and super readers sharing their favorite books with the world.

Shepherd is reader supported. When you buy books, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Book cover of Of Wind and Lightning

N. MacCameron Author Of Leoshine, Princess Oracle

From my list on combining science fiction with fantasy.

Why am I passionate about this?

I love knowing about things. Science is both a knowledge base and a way to discover new knowledge. I’ve been looking through microscopes and telescopes (that my dad built) from my earliest toddling. Though I have never been to university I have picked the brains of my scientific siblings (one of whom is a biology professor) and I read widely. Gathering crumbs from many sources gives a wider knowledge base than one university child afford. Scientists begin with speculation. I love inventing systems and worlds where we break one or a few of our known laws of nature or physics. Marrying science with fantasy births marvelous offspring!

N.'s book list on combining science fiction with fantasy

N. MacCameron Why did N. love this book?

Gripping character introductions, organic magic systems, extraordinary world-building, and superb writing. I felt the fire burn Selah and the yearning in William’s heart to do good despite loyalty to faulty leadership. Fighting galore!

I love weaving on a loom. I almost always write a weaver into my novels and Walker-Henderson’s series has a weaver too!

The Legendaries’ abilities - speed, strength, magnetic attraction, lung capacity, and resistance to fire are measurable and augmented in this story. Through the whole series geography is explored. Each Legendary comes from a different environment and climate. Selah comes from the desert. William comes from the mountains with mixed forest. They travel to the plains and the icy regions in their quest for the ancient relic that gives the possessor power over their destiny.

By Ella Walker Henderson,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Of Wind and Lightning as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In a land of legends, three rival nations hunt the ancient relic that can control rare and powerful warriors.

With lightning speed and an affinity for knives, Desa is a legendary, one of the warriors the relic can enslave.

Disguised as a mercenary, she joins a band of enemy warriors who also hunt the relic. In the height of battle, a startling connection links her to their leader.

Will he help her find the relic or betray her for the glory of his northern kingdom? His aid could be worth the risk.

For if her oldest adversary succeeds in the…


Book cover of Bed of Rose and Thorns

N. MacCameron Author Of Leoshine, Princess Oracle

From my list on combining science fiction with fantasy.

Why am I passionate about this?

I love knowing about things. Science is both a knowledge base and a way to discover new knowledge. I’ve been looking through microscopes and telescopes (that my dad built) from my earliest toddling. Though I have never been to university I have picked the brains of my scientific siblings (one of whom is a biology professor) and I read widely. Gathering crumbs from many sources gives a wider knowledge base than one university child afford. Scientists begin with speculation. I love inventing systems and worlds where we break one or a few of our known laws of nature or physics. Marrying science with fantasy births marvelous offspring!

N.'s book list on combining science fiction with fantasy

N. MacCameron Why did N. love this book?

The power of unrequited love that seeks no alternative. A knight loves his queen. He gives his life to protect her and is banished from her presence, yet he cannot resist the magic that arranges the world to draw them together.

Evil tries to convince us that it gives the greatest benefit. Sometimes that is temporarily true. I love stories where characters resist and suffer so that they receive the higher benefit of good. I am a musician and the magic of our knight rings true in my soul.

Highly philosophical, spiritual, fantastical, and deeply scientific, this book satisfies on every level.

“Thermodynamics, signal theory, Bayesian inference, inversion, quantum tunneling, and materials science are all elements of the internally consistent system of dynamics.” Lee Hunt

By Lee Hunt,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Bed of Rose and Thorns as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

"This spectacular standalone fantasy bursts with epic battles and avid romance." - Booklife Reviews Editor's Pick

“A beautifully crafted setting with complex character dynamics and layers of political intrigue… A showstopper.Hunt’s ambitious standalone latest has everything—a well-imagined fantasy world, great characters, incredible tension, and fierce love. The real genius here is the mixture of extraordinarily deep worldbuilding with relevant and complex themes, which include identity, intolerance, love, passion, friendship, integrity, honor and more.” - Prairies Book Review

“An intriguing storyline, scenarios grounded in the real world, and a breathless pace make Hunt’s latest standalone fantasy a must-read.” - BookView ReviewsRecommended…


Book cover of The Chimes of Alyafaleyn

N. MacCameron Author Of Leoshine, Princess Oracle

From my list on combining science fiction with fantasy.

Why am I passionate about this?

I love knowing about things. Science is both a knowledge base and a way to discover new knowledge. I’ve been looking through microscopes and telescopes (that my dad built) from my earliest toddling. Though I have never been to university I have picked the brains of my scientific siblings (one of whom is a biology professor) and I read widely. Gathering crumbs from many sources gives a wider knowledge base than one university child afford. Scientists begin with speculation. I love inventing systems and worlds where we break one or a few of our known laws of nature or physics. Marrying science with fantasy births marvelous offspring!

N.'s book list on combining science fiction with fantasy

N. MacCameron Why did N. love this book?

The older, wiser, and less magical Tamborel must protect Caidy. Her family and village suffer from, and do all they can to stop her from growing into her powers. Through hard work and sacrifice, Tamborel lifts Caidy out of darkness and defeats depression.

The science of music and sound play on my emotions throughout the story.

People with ADHD and Autism are similarly misunderstood. They can be hindered by neuro-typical people to “limit the damage” they may “inflict” on “normal” society. Caidy stirred my sympathy for these people. Knowledge and seeking are the basis of science, not the having of right answers. Tamborel uses his love to seek the knowledge that will set Caidy free.

Seems to be out of print. Any good second-hand store will have it.

By Grace Chetwin,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Chimes of Alyafaleyn as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Caidrun is born into Alyafaleyn - Region of Harmonies - where golden spheres, heynim, float in the air. Their gentle chiming uphold the very world's existence. While the ability to control the chimes usually comes in adolescence, Caidrun pulls a huge mass of them to her at lethal speed before she is two. A young boy, Tamborel, shields her from their impact and is badly hurt. People decide she has to be protected from herself. Deprived of the chimes, she grows up tone-deaf and filled with rage. Finally, she scatters someone's heynim and runs off. Tamborel sets out to find…


Book cover of Seventh Born

N. MacCameron Author Of Leoshine, Princess Oracle

From my list on combining science fiction with fantasy.

Why am I passionate about this?

I love knowing about things. Science is both a knowledge base and a way to discover new knowledge. I’ve been looking through microscopes and telescopes (that my dad built) from my earliest toddling. Though I have never been to university I have picked the brains of my scientific siblings (one of whom is a biology professor) and I read widely. Gathering crumbs from many sources gives a wider knowledge base than one university child afford. Scientists begin with speculation. I love inventing systems and worlds where we break one or a few of our known laws of nature or physics. Marrying science with fantasy births marvelous offspring!

N.'s book list on combining science fiction with fantasy

N. MacCameron Why did N. love this book?

I admit this one is a stretch, but the writing and premise are superb and worthy of recommendation. Many experiments have been done trying to prove or disprove telepathy and telekinesis, which are the magic in Rossano’s Talented. Quantum physics is moving in this direction. All our speculations may predict the future!

I am impressed with the family system in these books. The seventh son is special. The seventh son of a seventh son (Sept Son) is a ruler. Suddenly a daughter is born and blows everyone’s expectations and ambitions to smithereens. She has powers like a seventh son. Her love for the Sept Son threatens the kingdom.

By Rachel Rossano,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Seventh Born as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In a world where seventh born sons are valued for their strength and power, she is born a daughter.

Zezilia Ilar is the disappointment. Born after six brothers, she was supposed to be the son to restore her family’s prestige. She intends to remedy her shortcomings by being a dutiful daughter, marrying well and producing children, preferably a set of seven sons. But when someone offers her an alternative, she begins to dream of more.

In a society that worships a goddess, he follows the Almighty.

Hadrian Aleron, as a seventh son of a seventh son, stands to take up…


Book cover of Teak-Wallah: The Adventures of a Young Englishman in Thailand in the 1920s

Ron Emmons Author Of Teak Lord

From my list on exploring colonialism in Southeast Asia.

Why am I passionate about this?

During 30 years living in Chiang Mai, Thailand, I have developed a deep appreciation of Northern Thai culture and a fascination with its 700-year history. Though the region escaped being colonised as were nearby Laos (by the French) and Burma (by the Brits), a teak boom in the late 19th century came close to pulling it under the colonial yoke as Western trading companies muscled in. Teak Lord explores the frequently fragile relationships between circumspect Asians and adventurous Westerners, against a background of shifting borders and impenetrable jungle.

Ron's book list on exploring colonialism in Southeast Asia

Ron Emmons Why did Ron love this book?

This memoir of a teak inspector working in the forests of North Siam offers a fascinating glimpse into the life of an Englishman coming to terms with an alien culture and environment in the 1920s. Campbell’s sharp observations and dry wit carry the reader through the steps involved in teak logging, from girdling the trees to felling, dragging, and floating them downstream, and offer the chance to share encounters with man-eating tigers and rogue elephants along the way.

By Reginald Campbell,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Teak-Wallah as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Here is a bold and entertaining account of the life of a European teak inspector working in the heart of the Thai countryside in the 1920s. Beginning with a description of his voyage, Campbell conveys the adventure and the loneliness, the beauty and the terror, that was the White Man's lot and sprinkles his narrative with pithy anecdotes about his various encounters. Teak-Wallah is an evocative tale of a world that still exists, but in which the European no longer has a role.


Book cover of A Single Pilgrim

Ron Emmons Author Of Teak Lord

From my list on exploring colonialism in Southeast Asia.

Why am I passionate about this?

During 30 years living in Chiang Mai, Thailand, I have developed a deep appreciation of Northern Thai culture and a fascination with its 700-year history. Though the region escaped being colonised as were nearby Laos (by the French) and Burma (by the Brits), a teak boom in the late 19th century came close to pulling it under the colonial yoke as Western trading companies muscled in. Teak Lord explores the frequently fragile relationships between circumspect Asians and adventurous Westerners, against a background of shifting borders and impenetrable jungle.

Ron's book list on exploring colonialism in Southeast Asia

Ron Emmons Why did Ron love this book?

Norman Lewis is best known for his non-fiction works such as The Golden Land (about Burma) and A Dragon Apparent (about Vietnam). Yet he also wrote a dozen novels that show a great flair for characterisation, dialogue and plot pacing, in addition to his incisive descriptions. A Single Pilgrim tells the story of John Crane, manager of a teak logging company in North Thailand, who revels in “the voluptuousness of routine and civilized triviality”. However, his company’s leases are about to expire and the thought of an end to his Oriental idyll is more than Crane can bear.

By Norman Lewis,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Single Pilgrim as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Book cover of The Beach

Suzanne Heywood Author Of Wavewalker: A Memoir of Breaking Free

From my list on coming-of-age that will rip your heart out.

Why am I passionate about this?

I'm fascinated by these books about coming of age because they all share elements of my own experience. While I was growing up, I was told by my parents that my life on board our boat Wavewalker was ‘privileged’ and that I was lucky not to live a ‘boring’ life like other children. It took me a long time to question this view, and even longer to find an escape. As an adult looking back, I now know that many of the things I was told by my parents were not true. That experience of growing up and discovering that what you have been told is not right is deeply disturbing, while also being liberating.

Suzanne's book list on coming-of-age that will rip your heart out

Suzanne Heywood Why did Suzanne love this book?

This book is a little different because, although it is a coming of age in a way, the characters within it are already young adults when the story begins.

What I love about it though is that (like in many of the other books I have selected) the young people in this tale start off in a world that superficially is one thing – a beautiful tropical island - but then becomes something very different – a horrifically violent community. That divergence of the appearance of a place from the reality of living within it is fascinating.

By Alex Garland,

Why should I read it?

4 authors picked The Beach as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

On Richard's first night in Bangkok, a fellow traveller slits his wrists, leaving Richard a map to "the Beach", where white sands circle a lagoon hidden from the sea, coral gardens and freshwater falls are surrounded by jungle. Richard was looking for adventure, and now he has found it.


Book cover of Siamese White

Ron Emmons Author Of Teak Lord

From my list on exploring colonialism in Southeast Asia.

Why am I passionate about this?

During 30 years living in Chiang Mai, Thailand, I have developed a deep appreciation of Northern Thai culture and a fascination with its 700-year history. Though the region escaped being colonised as were nearby Laos (by the French) and Burma (by the Brits), a teak boom in the late 19th century came close to pulling it under the colonial yoke as Western trading companies muscled in. Teak Lord explores the frequently fragile relationships between circumspect Asians and adventurous Westerners, against a background of shifting borders and impenetrable jungle.

Ron's book list on exploring colonialism in Southeast Asia

Ron Emmons Why did Ron love this book?

When I read this gripping biography of Samuel White from Bath in England, who rose from being an interloper in the trade of Southeast Asia to become ruler of a huge tract of land on the Andaman Coast of Siam/Burma, I was smiling and shaking my head at the improbability of it all. White’s outlandish and piratical adventures are comparable to the wild exploits of Pirates of the Caribbean, and at times left me gasping in disbelief. Maurice Collis is little known these days, yet his two decades (1912–1934) as an administrator in Burma made him the ideal candidate to recount this remarkable tale.

By Maurice Collis,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Siamese White as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Foremost among the biographies that Maurice Collis wrote during his wide-ranging literary career is Siamese White - an account of the career of Samuel White of Bath who, during the reign of James II, was appointed by the King of Siam as a mandarin of that country. The book superbly embodies that old adage - truth is stranger than fiction.

'A magnificent story, full of interest and excitement, but there is more to it than that. Collis, who has lived for years on the scene of these high happenings, is able to give us a first-hand picture of a fascinating…


Book cover of Burmese Days

Ron Emmons Author Of Teak Lord

From my list on exploring colonialism in Southeast Asia.

Why am I passionate about this?

During 30 years living in Chiang Mai, Thailand, I have developed a deep appreciation of Northern Thai culture and a fascination with its 700-year history. Though the region escaped being colonised as were nearby Laos (by the French) and Burma (by the Brits), a teak boom in the late 19th century came close to pulling it under the colonial yoke as Western trading companies muscled in. Teak Lord explores the frequently fragile relationships between circumspect Asians and adventurous Westerners, against a background of shifting borders and impenetrable jungle.

Ron's book list on exploring colonialism in Southeast Asia

Ron Emmons Why did Ron love this book?

A lifelong hero of mine, George Orwell is best known for his political allegories Animal Farm and 1984, but his first published novel, written after a five-year stint as a policeman in Burma, gave an indication of his direction as a writer, with a vicious swipe at colonial attitudes and manners. The main character, John Flory, is a jaded teak merchant who detests the colonial “lie that we’re here to uplift our Black brothers instead of to rob them”. He has no friends at the local colonial club, is unlucky in love and meets a tragic end—all part of Orwell’s drive to “tell it like it is.”

By George Orwell,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Burmese Days as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Honest and evocative, George Orwell's first novel is an examination of the debasing effect of empire on occupied and occupier.

Burmese Days focuses on a handful of Englishmen who meet at the European Club to drink whisky and to alleviate the acute and unspoken loneliness of life in 1920s Burma-where Orwell himself served as an imperial policeman-during the waning days of British imperialism.

One of the men, James Flory, a timber merchant, has grown soft, clearly comprehending the futility of England's rule. However, he lacks the fortitude to stand up for his Indian friend, Dr. Veraswami, for admittance into the…


Book cover of Prisna

John Burgess Author Of A Woman of Angkor

From my list on fiction set in Southeast Asia throughout time.

Why am I passionate about this?

I first saw Angkor, capital of the Khmer Empire, in 1969 as a teenager and was bowled over by the place. I kept coming back as a journalist and author. They say you should write about things that truly crank your engine, and I found mine—imperial conquest, Hindu and Buddhist spirituality, astounding architecture, and the lives of the millions of people who inhabited and built the place. I’ve now written three non-fiction books and two historical novels set in the civilization’s twelfth-century peak. The novels are an effort to recreate life in the old days. They draw heavily on my years in Southeast Asia, experiencing what life is like in the present day.

John's book list on fiction set in Southeast Asia throughout time

John Burgess Why did John love this book?

Life and love among the Siamese well-off in the late 1930s. Broken hearts, vacations at the beach, flirtation on a tennis court. The story is driven by the return of a sister (Prisna) who has grown up in America and acquired shocking cosmopolitan ways—wearing shorts to the movies, for instance. It’s an entertaining read, yet deep in its own way, a favorite for someone (me) who lived in Thailand for six years. The book is well known there, but hardly gets noticed abroad. Prisna was written by a member of the Thai royal family, drawing from the world she inhabited. You should always be careful comparing things to Jane Austen, but this has many of the same classic attributes: a domestic focus, the search for a husband, characters drawn with poise and sympathy, prose that never contains a word more than needed.

By Princess Vibhavadi Rangsit, Tulachandra (translator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Prisna as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Prisna Volume 1 and Volume 2 take place in 1938 in Phra Nakhon, Thailand, during a time when men and women were not equals. Marriage for women meant security, not love. Prisna is the youngest daughter among four girls and was the only one raised in America by their uncle. She is outgoing, cheerful, and pretty, but at the same time, she is also headstrong, intelligent, and opinionated. She returns to Siam after living in America for 12 years and is once again reunited with her family. Prisna, whose name means “mystery, a puzzle/ riddle,” causes quite a stir in…


5 book lists we think you will like!

Interested in Southeast Asia, archaeology, and Thailand?

10,000+ authors have recommended their favorite books and what they love about them. Browse their picks for the best books about Southeast Asia, archaeology, and Thailand.

Southeast Asia Explore 35 books about Southeast Asia
Archaeology Explore 118 books about archaeology
Thailand Explore 36 books about Thailand