10 books like A Thousand Miles Up the Nile

By Amelia B. Edwards,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like A Thousand Miles Up the Nile. Shepherd is a community of 7,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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The Keys of Egypt

By Lesley Adkins, Roy Adkins,

Book cover of The Keys of Egypt: The Obsession to Decipher Egyptian Hieroglyphs

This was one of the first books I read when I began researching my family’s passion for Egypt, and it was one of the most interesting.

When Napoleon invaded Egypt in 1798 his troops were astonished to find countless ruins, covered with hieroglyphs – but what did they mean? Being able to read the ancient texts would be the key to unravelling many of the mysteries of ancient Egypt. Determined to be the first to do so was 16-year-old Jean-Francois Champollion, the brilliant son of an impoverished bookseller. This book is a true story of adventure, obsession, and triumph over extreme adversity, and is well worth reading.

The Keys of Egypt

By Lesley Adkins, Roy Adkins,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Keys of Egypt as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A vivid and superbly written account of the unravelling of one of the great intellectual puzzles, set against the backdop of Europe in the Napoleonic era.

When Napoleon invaded Egypt in 1798, his troops were astonished to discover ancient temples, tombs and statues, all covered with hieroglyphs - the last remnants of an unreadable script and a language lost in time. On their return Egyptomania spread rapidly and the quest to decipher hieroglyphs began in earnest.

Jean-Francois Champollion was obsessed with ancient languages from a very young age, and once he heard of the unreadable ancient Egyptian text he had…


Crocodile on the Sandbank

By Elizabeth Peters,

Book cover of Crocodile on the Sandbank

I stumbled across a dog-eared copy of this book at a college library sale and immediately fell in love. Crocodile on the Sandbank brings us to late Victorian Egypt, reproducing both the good (unparalleled discoveries) and the bad (British attitudes towards Egypt) of that time. Through it all strides Amelia Peabody, a confident, educated spinster with a medical kit in one hand and a parasol for whacking dastardly criminals in the other. She’s here to explore ancient ruins and chew bubblegum, and a dignified lady wouldn’t dream of chewing bubblegum. And what’s all this nonsense about a walking mummy? Don’t be daft!

Crocodile on the Sandbank

By Elizabeth Peters,

Why should I read it?

7 authors picked Crocodile on the Sandbank as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Amelia Peabody is Elizabeth Peters' most brilliant and best-loved creation, a thoroughly Victorian feminist who takes the stuffy world of archaeology by storm with her shocking men's pants and no-nonsense attitude!

In this first adventure, our headstrong heroine decides to use her substantial inheritance to see the world. On her travels, she rescues a gentlewoman in distress - Evelyn Barton-Forbes - and the two become friends. The two companions continue to Egypt where they face mysteries, mummies and the redoubtable Radcliffe Emerson, an outspoken archaeologist, who doesn't need women to help him solve mysteries -- at least that's what he…


Tales of Ancient Egypt

By Roger Lancelyn Green,

Book cover of Tales of Ancient Egypt

This was my introduction to ancient Egypt. I was twelve when I was given this book. I was immediately entranced by the beautifully told stories not only of the gods, but also of magic, shipwrecks, princesses, and thieves.

Egypt is an extraordinary country entirely reliant for thousands of years on the annual inundation of the river Nile. If the water levels were too low there was starvation, and too high there were devastating floods. In some places, the fertile area is a little wider than the flight of an arrow. With life so precarious, it is not surprising that the afterlife became so important to all Egyptians and that they spun so many myths to explain the inexplicable, and give structure to their world.

This book is a great introduction to understanding the ancient Egyptians for anyone, but particularly for younger readers of 10+.

Tales of Ancient Egypt

By Roger Lancelyn Green,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Tales of Ancient Egypt as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

These stories include the great myths - of Amen-Ra, who created all the creatures in the world; of Isis, seaching the waters for her dead husband Osiris; of the Bennu Bird and the Book of Thoth. But there are also tales told for pleasure about magic, treasure and adventure - even the first ever Cinderella story.


The Tale of Sinuhe

By Richard Parkinson,

Book cover of The Tale of Sinuhe: And Other Ancient Egyptian Poems 1940-1640 B.C.

I was immediately attracted to this volume of poetry, particularly when I realised that fragments from the original Tale of Sinuhe papyrus, had at one time been in the collection at Didlington Hall.

Professor Richard Parkinson introduces each poem from the Middle Kingdom and sets it in the context of its time. The Tale of Sinuhe is one of the most famous poems and was written around 1875 BC. It is an illuminating tale of adventure in foreign lands, but one in which Sinuhe reflects on life in Egypt and his relationship with the king. While The Tale of the Shipwrecked Sailor is an entertaining account of fantastic and exciting adventures with a universal moral. These, and the other eleven poems provide fascinating insights into the minds and culture of the ancient Egyptians.

For someone who enjoys poetry and wants to experience the literature of these ancient people ‘first hand’,…

The Tale of Sinuhe

By Richard Parkinson,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Tale of Sinuhe as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The Tale of Sinuhe, from c.1875 BC, has been acclaimed as the supreme masterpiece of Ancient Egyptian poetry, a perfect fusion of monumental, dramatic, and lyrical styles, and a passionate probing of its culture's ideals and anxieties. This anthology contains all the substantial surviving works from the golden age of Egyptian fictional literature. Composed by an anonymous author in the form of a funerary autobiography the Tale tells how the
courtier Sinuhe flees Egypt at the death of his king. Other works from the Middle Kingdom (c.1940-1640 BC) include a poetic dialogue between a man and his soul on the…


Visit to Iceland and the Scandinavian North

By Madame Ida Pfeiffer,

Book cover of Visit to Iceland and the Scandinavian North

In 1842, after 45 years of frustratingly sedentary domesticity, the Austrian-born Ida Pfeiffer gave full vent to her wanderlust. Within five years, her jaw-dropping round-the-world journeys would make her one of the most widely-traveled persons of that century, while her talent for vivid portrayals made her one of the most well-known travel writers. Of her many chronicles, I especially enjoy this tale of her 1845 trip to the northern reaches of Scandinavia and Iceland—a place almost no continental Europeans had visited and few even knew existed. Pfeiffer’s insights and thoughtful reportage, as well as a newly emerging fascination with Iceland and Icelanders in our own time, has given this rare travel narrative new currency.

Visit to Iceland and the Scandinavian North

By Madame Ida Pfeiffer,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Visit to Iceland and the Scandinavian North as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This collection of literature attempts to compile many of the classic works that have stood the test of time and offer them at a reduced, affordable price, in an attractive volume so that everyone can enjoy them.


Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole in Many Lands

By Mary Seacole,

Book cover of Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole in Many Lands

The first autobiography published by an Afro-Caribbean (“Creole”) woman, this “adventure story” chronicles the life of Jamaican icon and national heroine, Mary Seacole who, in her own time, rivaled Florence Nightingale as a founder of modern nursing. The “yaller doctress” became known for her devising of successful treatments for cholera, yellow fever, and malaria in Jamaica and, later, Panama, and became internationally renowned after founding her own hospital-hotel at the frontlines of the Crimean War (1853-1856) where she nursed members of the British military. Upon publication, Seacole’s best-selling life-story gained her awards, acclaim, and the respect of the British nation (denied her by Florence Nightingale, by the way). Seacole’s effervescent writing bubbles over with optimism and can-do spirit.

Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole in Many Lands

By Mary Seacole,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole in Many Lands as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

HarperCollins is proud to present its incredible range of best-loved, essential classics.

Unless I am allowed to tell the story of my life in my own way, I cannot tell it at all

Mary Seacole - traveller, nurse, businesswoman and radical for her time - defied a prejudiced British government to care for soldiers wounded during the Crimean War.

This ground breaking account, written by Seacole in 1857, brings to life her incredible journey from Jamaica to Central America and England, and then on to modern-day Ukraine, where she acted as nurse to injured soldiers while running her business, the…


Memoirs of an Arabian Princess from Zanzibar

By Emily Ruete,

Book cover of Memoirs of an Arabian Princess from Zanzibar

In 1865, the 22-year-old Salama bint Said (later known as Emily Reute), daughter of the great Sultan Said of Zanzibar, become involved in a failed coup against her older brother. Fleeing for her life with her German lover, Rudolph Ruete, she would find herself widowed with two children and marooned in Germany without financial support at age 26. Written as a heartwarming series of letters addressed to her children, the first known autobiography and travelogue published by an Arab woman poses serious challenge to the rationales underlying both women’s subordination and economic dependence on men as well as European imperialism in Africa and the Arab world.

Memoirs of an Arabian Princess from Zanzibar

By Emily Ruete,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Memoirs of an Arabian Princess from Zanzibar as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Return to an era when Zanzibar was ruled by sultans, and enter a vanished world of harems, slave trading, and court intrigues. In this insider's story, a sultan's daughter who fled her gilded cage offers a compelling look at nineteenth-century Arabic and African royal life. After years of exile in Europe, the former princess wrote this fascinating memoir as a legacy for her children and a warm reminiscence of her island home.
Born Salamah bint Said, Princess of Zanzibar, in 1844, author Emily Ruete grew up in a harem with scores of siblings. The royal family maintained its fabulous wealth…


Around the World in Seventy-Two Days

By Nellie Bly,

Book cover of Around the World in Seventy-Two Days

Bly was a brilliant investigative journalist best known in the United States for her exposé of the Women’s Lunatic Asylum based on her feigning of insanity as an undercover patient … until she became even more famous for her circumnavigation of the globe, inspired by Jules Verne’s fictional Around the World in 80 Days. Sponsored and encouraged by Joseph Pulitzer (editor of the tabloid newspaper, The New York World) and written in a witty, breezy style, Bly’s pithily-told tale upends every stereotype of fragile Victorian womanhood; her gutsy candor about her madcap race around what was supposed to be a wholly man’s world still stuns and delights!

Around the World in Seventy-Two Days

By Nellie Bly,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Around the World in Seventy-Two Days as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

"She was part of the 'stunt girl' movement that was very important in the 1880s and 1890s as these big, mass-circulation yellow journalism papers came into the fore." -Brooke Kroeger

Around the World in Seventy-Two Days (1890) is a travel narrative by American investigative journalist Nellie Bly. Proposed as a recreation of the journey undertaken by Phileas Fogg in Jules Verne's Around the World in Eighty Days (1873), Bly's journey was covered in Joseph Pulitzer's popular newspaper the New York World, inspiring countless others to attempt to surpass her record. At the time, readers at home were encouraged to estimate…


An Egyptian Journal

By William Golding,

Book cover of An Egyptian Journal

At the age of seventy-two, William Golding, British author of Lord of the Flies, set off on a trip down the Nile with his wife and an Egyptian guide. Golding had long had a burning passion for Egypt, stating that ". . . for the last sixty years I must have read every popular book ever written about Egypt." But as his journalistic observations illustrate, there was still so much more to be learned by personal experience. I love this book for Golding's wry, gentle sensibility, his cozy erudition, his intellectual warmth, his wisdom about life and interpersonal relationships in general, and his wonderful sense of humor. I laughed aloud at many points in this book.

An Egyptian Journal

By William Golding,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked An Egyptian Journal as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

William Golding's interest in ancient Egypt has previously been expressed in two essays, and in the novella "The Scorpion God". This account covers his journey down the Nile in today's Egypt. He recalls his trip honestly and humorously, and shares his feelings about Egypt past and present.


The Inner Guide to Egypt

By Alan Richardson, Billie Walker John,

Book cover of The Inner Guide to Egypt: A Magical Journey to the Land of the Pharaohs: 1

Firstly, because the authors are known to me as highly respected magical practitioners and, second, because using the Nile to represent the river of consciousness it offers up a comprehensive system for inner development not seen before. The Inner Guide to Egypt takes us on a voyage of discovery that never ends because its images keep popping into our imagination, long after we’ve put the book down. It was originally published by Thoth Publications (1991) and currently by Llewellyn (2010) but its appeal has never diminished for true seekers after the Egyptian Mystery Tradition.

The Inner Guide to Egypt

By Alan Richardson, Billie Walker John,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Inner Guide to Egypt as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


5 book lists we think you will like!

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