The best books about Queen Victoria

2 authors have picked their favorite books about Queen Victoria and why they recommend each book.

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My Memories of Six Reigns

By Princess Marie Louise,

Book cover of My Memories of Six Reigns

This is a charming book, filled with amusing and touching anecdotes by Queen Victoria’s granddaughter, Princess Marie Louise, whose lovely character shines through every page.  The simple style and lack of chronological order create the impression that the reader is sitting with the author as she simply recounts her remarkable memories of the people and places of another era. Just beautiful! 


Who am I?

All my life, I have had a passion for history and, the moment I came upon Queen Victoria while browsing the history section in the local library, I was hooked! Far from being the dour Widow of Windsor, it was clear that she was a highly-intelligent, forward-thinking, often amusing, and often amused woman, with fascinating relatives and connections across the whole world. Her family life mirrored that of any ordinary family, with its ups and downs, its petty squabbles, and a myriad of contrasting characters, each with a unique and interesting story to tell. With so many avenues yet to explore, this is a passion that could last a lifetime!


I wrote...

Queen Victoria's Granddaughters: 1860-1918

By Christina Croft,

Book cover of Queen Victoria's Granddaughters: 1860-1918

What is my book about?

From a Russian saint, martyred in a mine shaft in Siberia, to the Queens of Norway, Greece, Romania, and Spain, Queen Victoria’s twenty-two granddaughters lived not only through the halcyon days of the European monarchies but also through tragedy and the horrors of war and revolution. Some, like the unassuming Princess Louise of Wales, lived and died in virtual obscurity while others, like the dazzling Queen Marie of Romania and the ill-fated Empress Alexandra of Russia, played a major and memorable role in world events; but, through all the upheavals and conflicts, and, even when wars had divided their nations, one person had bound them together and, to the end of their lives, all would remember ‘dearest grandmama’ – Queen Victoria – with love.

Queen Victoria and the Discovery of the Riviera

By Michael Nelson,

Book cover of Queen Victoria and the Discovery of the Riviera

This lovely book dispels the myth that, after Albert’s death, Queen Victoria spent forty years in Windsor Castle in perpetual mourning, as it describes her delight in her many holidays on the Cote D’Azur. The book introduces the Queen’s companions, John Brown and the Munshi, alongside many other well-known characters of the era, including the infamous Leopold II of the Belgians. "Oh, if only I were at Nice, I should recover!" she said during her final illness, and it is unsurprising that, at the time of her death, her aides were forced to cancel the plans she had made for her next visit to her beloved Riviera.  


Who am I?

All my life, I have had a passion for history and, the moment I came upon Queen Victoria while browsing the history section in the local library, I was hooked! Far from being the dour Widow of Windsor, it was clear that she was a highly-intelligent, forward-thinking, often amusing, and often amused woman, with fascinating relatives and connections across the whole world. Her family life mirrored that of any ordinary family, with its ups and downs, its petty squabbles, and a myriad of contrasting characters, each with a unique and interesting story to tell. With so many avenues yet to explore, this is a passion that could last a lifetime!


I wrote...

Queen Victoria's Granddaughters: 1860-1918

By Christina Croft,

Book cover of Queen Victoria's Granddaughters: 1860-1918

What is my book about?

From a Russian saint, martyred in a mine shaft in Siberia, to the Queens of Norway, Greece, Romania, and Spain, Queen Victoria’s twenty-two granddaughters lived not only through the halcyon days of the European monarchies but also through tragedy and the horrors of war and revolution. Some, like the unassuming Princess Louise of Wales, lived and died in virtual obscurity while others, like the dazzling Queen Marie of Romania and the ill-fated Empress Alexandra of Russia, played a major and memorable role in world events; but, through all the upheavals and conflicts, and, even when wars had divided their nations, one person had bound them together and, to the end of their lives, all would remember ‘dearest grandmama’ – Queen Victoria – with love.

Ask Sir James

By Michaela Reid,

Book cover of Ask Sir James: The Life of Sire James Reid, Personal Physician to Queen Victoria

Based on the notes of Queen Victoria’s doctor, Sir James Reid, this book, written by his daughter, gives a wonderful insight into the relationships within the extended Royal Family as well as the numerous ailments with which they were afflicted. There are many amusing episodes, including the Queen’s indignation on hearing that doctors intended to remove her son-in-law’s eye, following a shooting accident; and her refusal to alter her diet to cure her frequent indigestion. Of all the books about Queen Victoria, none gives a more comprehensive account of her final hours, death, and the preparations for her funeral. 


Who am I?

All my life, I have had a passion for history and, the moment I came upon Queen Victoria while browsing the history section in the local library, I was hooked! Far from being the dour Widow of Windsor, it was clear that she was a highly-intelligent, forward-thinking, often amusing, and often amused woman, with fascinating relatives and connections across the whole world. Her family life mirrored that of any ordinary family, with its ups and downs, its petty squabbles, and a myriad of contrasting characters, each with a unique and interesting story to tell. With so many avenues yet to explore, this is a passion that could last a lifetime!


I wrote...

Queen Victoria's Granddaughters: 1860-1918

By Christina Croft,

Book cover of Queen Victoria's Granddaughters: 1860-1918

What is my book about?

From a Russian saint, martyred in a mine shaft in Siberia, to the Queens of Norway, Greece, Romania, and Spain, Queen Victoria’s twenty-two granddaughters lived not only through the halcyon days of the European monarchies but also through tragedy and the horrors of war and revolution. Some, like the unassuming Princess Louise of Wales, lived and died in virtual obscurity while others, like the dazzling Queen Marie of Romania and the ill-fated Empress Alexandra of Russia, played a major and memorable role in world events; but, through all the upheavals and conflicts, and, even when wars had divided their nations, one person had bound them together and, to the end of their lives, all would remember ‘dearest grandmama’ – Queen Victoria – with love.

Anno Dracula

By Kim Newman,

Book cover of Anno Dracula

Newman’s creative mashup brings a dizzying host of personalities into the Jack the Ripper murders as historical people and characters from fiction collide in Queen Victoria’s London. Vlad Tepes casts a long shadow across the political and social landscape. This take on Dracula himself, and other ancient vampires, is fresh and frightening and I was glad to discover it. The playful mix has Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes and Inspector Lestrade investigating The Ripper in a world where vampires are out in public, and Vlad is Prince Consort to Queen Victoria. The bold concept works well and is a ferociously fun ride.


Who am I?

I was introduced to vampires through Barnabas Collins of Dark Shadows fame, but I was a child and found the show boring. But, when I was 15, I was handed the paperback edition of Salem’s Lot and it scared me to death. I was hooked, reading books, and watching movies about vampires whenever the chance arose. When I wrote the first draft of Redemption, it sat for years before I reworked it, reading Dracula again and taking notes, researching Vlad the Impaler, and watching lots of vampire movies before re-writing it. Since then, I’ve continued reading vampire fiction and watching movies and shows about the creatures whenever I can.


I wrote...

Redemption

By Victoria Steele Logue,

Book cover of Redemption

What is my book about?

It is the 21st Century and Wolfdietrich has grown tired of being a vampire. But, on his way back to his hideaway, he spots Ginny, a woman who reminds him of his long-lost love. Trapped as a vampire for nearly four centuries, Wolf rediscovers the humanity he lost as well as his love for Ginny. Unfortunately, there is one obstacle preventing their being together—the vampire who created him, Vlad Drakulya, still walks the earth. Even though killing Vlad will destroy the man she loves, Ginny joins Wolf in the search for his maker. Redemption entwines the stories of Vlad III and Wolf, sweeping through centuries of history and across continents. Wolf has found love, but can a vampire find redemption?

And Only to Deceive

By Tasha Alexander,

Book cover of And Only to Deceive

I had the great pleasure of meeting Tasha at a writers’ conference some years ago, and we hit it off immediately. Not only was she warm and generous, she has a subtle wit that had me giggling in all sorts of inappropriate situations. Combine that with our mutual love of travel to the great cities of the world, and I knew that I would love her Lady Emily mysteries. To journey with Lady Emily is to vicariously visit 19th century Constantinople and Paris, St. Petersburg, and London—all in the company of a smart, sophisticated lady with a delightfully wry sense of humour.


Who am I?

So look, I’m going to admit something: I’ve been casting myself as the heroine in historical adventures and mysteries since the age of six. I’ve been Sherlock Holmes’s daughter, Elizabeth Bennett’s slightly disreputable sleuthing cousin, the lone lady Pinkerton hunting down Butch and Sundance. These youthful fantasies combined three things I adored: puzzles, adventure, and geeking out on history. When I got a little older, I left off imagining myself in the starring role in favour of something even more immersive: becoming someone else entirely. Whether I’m writing them or reading them, books like the ones on this list transport me, and I hope they’ll transport you, too.


I wrote...

Murder on Millionaires' Row: A Mystery

By Erin Lindsey,

Book cover of Murder on Millionaires' Row: A Mystery

What is my book about?

Rose Gallagher might dream of bigger things, but she’s content enough with her life as a housemaid. After all, it’s not every girl from Five Points who gets to spend her days in a posh Fifth Avenue brownstone, even if only to sweep its floors. But all that changes on the day her boss, Mr. Thomas Wiltshire, disappears. 

The investigation takes her from the marble palaces of Fifth Avenue to the sordid streets of Five Points. When a ghostly apparition accosts her on the street, Rose begins to realize the world around her isn’t at all as it seems – and her place in it is about to change forever.

Larrikins, Bush Tales and Other Great Australian Stories

By Graham Seal,

Book cover of Larrikins, Bush Tales and Other Great Australian Stories

This is a cornucopia of the weird and wonderful in Australia: the origins of ‘mateship’, rural remedies, measuring the weather by the behaviour of birds, how ‘Waltzing Matilda’ had its origins in a shearers’ strike, and the bizarre life of the itinerant swagman, including hints on how to make a ‘swag’ and carry it according to the legendary writer Henry Lawson. There are wonderful tales of Australian ‘taciturnity’ and folks living so remotely they still thought Queen Victoria was on the throne in the mid-1900s. It may be light-hearted in tone but this book somehow gets to the heart of what makes Australians unlike anyone else in the world.  


Who am I?

I’m a Pom, as Aussies would say, born and bred in England to an Australian mother and British father. I emigrated to Australia as a ten-pound Pom way back when and though I eventually came home again I’ve always retained an affection and a curiosity about the country, which in time led me to write three books about my own family history there. The early days of colonial Australia, when around 1400 people, half of whom were convicts, ventured across the world to found a penal colony in a country they knew almost nothing about, is one of the most fascinating and frankly unlikely stories you could ever hope to come across. 


I wrote...

The Worst Country in the World

By Patsy Trench,

Book cover of The Worst Country in the World

What is my book about?

Part history, part family history, part memoir, and part dramatisation, my book is about early colonial Australia as witnessed by my four times great grandmother and her family of five children, who migrated to New South Wales in 1801, barely 13 years after the First Fleet arrived and when the place was considered an experiment and not yet fit to live in. (The title is taken from a comment made by Governor Phillip’s second in command.) It attempts to tell through my family’s eyes how the colony began to become established and even to thrive, as did my ancestress and her offspring, who gave up their lives of relative poverty in the old country to eventually flourish in the new. 

The Royal Mob

By Theresa Sherman,

Book cover of The Royal Mob

Very well researched and well written, the author weaves historical facts into the story with elegant ease, which makes it not only fun to read but also informative. There was even a point when I had to double-check to make sure this was really a work of fiction and not a real memoir by Victoria Battenberg. You really get to know her in this book, and realize that she was not just one of the more obscure of Queen Victoria's granddaughters, but an interesting character in her own right, who was a witness to the crucial historical events of the late 19th and early 20th century.

Who am I?

After a relatively short career in research science, Helen Azar switched gears and returned to graduate school to fulfill a dream of becoming a reference librarian. She worked at the Free Library of Philadelphia for ten years, during which time she became a published author. While researching for her first book, The Diary of Olga Romanov, Helen visited Russia several times, and worked in the Rare Book Fund at the Museum at Tsarskoe Selo, which holds the imperial book collection. Today, Helen lives on the beautiful far south coast of New South Wales, Australia; she continues writing about Russia's last imperial family and leads Romanov history tours. She also administers The Romanov Family website and is the content creator for a YouTube channel In the Steps of the Romanovs.


I wrote...

In the Steps of the Romanovs: Final two years of the last Russian imperial family (1916-1918)

By Helen Azar,

Book cover of In the Steps of the Romanovs: Final two years of the last Russian imperial family (1916-1918)

What is my book about?

By 1916, Russia had been involved in the First World War for almost two years, and events were about to take a tumultuous turn. Tsar Nicholas II was forced to abdicate his throne, and what followed was a struggle that neither he, nor most of his nearest, were destined to survive. This volume offers an accurate glimpse into the final two years of the last Imperial Family of Russia: exclusively through their own diary entries and personal correspondence, supplemented by contemporary eyewitness accounts, many of which are published here in English for the first time.

The reader will get to know on a deeper level the Grand Duchesses and the Empress, as they work at Tsarskoe Selo infirmaries; witness the imperial family's grief for their murdered "Friend" Grigori Rasputin; experience their arrest after the outbreak of the revolution, and follow them into captivity in Siberia - and ultimately the Red Ural - where they meet their tragic end in the cellar of "The House of Special Purpose". This already familiar unique piece of history is individually told by Nicholas, Alexandra, and their five children: Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia, and Alexei. Their collective personal story is a portrayal of a united family bound together by love, hardship, and tragedy, taking place during the twilight of an extraordinary bygone era. 

Queen Victoria

By A.E. Moorat,

Book cover of Queen Victoria: Demon Hunter

If you love reading about English royalty and history as I do, then it’s not too hard to let go of reality and let the legendary Queen of England, Queen Victoria, take on an even larger role in her vast empire. I can’t think of anyone I’d rather see keep the kingdom free from zombies and demons than a strong-willed Queen willing to vanquish evil with her scepter.


Who am I?

Growing up in Chicago, I’ve always had a fascination for history, (even if it was sometimes a bit gory!), from Capone and the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre to reading about monsters and the unique worlds created by favorite author Stephen King. So, it’s probably not too surprising that I combined both interests and offered a new solution to the infamous Lizzie Borden axe murders of 1892 in my own book series. I enjoy reading, and writing, the serious to the not-so-serious, often incorporating touches of humor, or at least the absurd, where and whenever I can. 


I wrote...

Lizzie Borden, Zombie Hunter

By C.A. Verstraete,

Book cover of Lizzie Borden, Zombie Hunter

What is my book about?

One hot August morning in 1892, Lizzie Borden picked up an axe and murdered her father and stepmother. Newspapers claim she did it for the oldest of reasons: family conflicts, jealousy, and greed. But what if Lizzie slaughtered them because they’d become… zombies?

Thrust into a horrific world where the walking dead are part of a shocking conspiracy to infect not only Fall River, Massachusetts, but also the world beyond, Lizzie battles to protect her sister, Emma, and her hometown from nightmarish ghouls and the evil forces controlling them. Read the continuation in Lizzie Borden, Zombie Hunter 2: The Axe Will Fall!

Victoria R.I.

By Elizabeth Longford,

Book cover of Victoria R.I.

This was the first biography of Queen Victoria that I read and, to date, it remains the best! Effortlessly combing in the personal with the political, it not only portrays Victoria as a Queen but also as a woman, who could simultaneously be one of the most dominant monarchs of the 19th century, and as nervous as a child. A brilliant portrayal of a fascinating character, playing a major role in one of the most interesting eras in history!


Who am I?

All my life, I have had a passion for history and, the moment I came upon Queen Victoria while browsing the history section in the local library, I was hooked! Far from being the dour Widow of Windsor, it was clear that she was a highly-intelligent, forward-thinking, often amusing, and often amused woman, with fascinating relatives and connections across the whole world. Her family life mirrored that of any ordinary family, with its ups and downs, its petty squabbles, and a myriad of contrasting characters, each with a unique and interesting story to tell. With so many avenues yet to explore, this is a passion that could last a lifetime!


I wrote...

Queen Victoria's Granddaughters: 1860-1918

By Christina Croft,

Book cover of Queen Victoria's Granddaughters: 1860-1918

What is my book about?

From a Russian saint, martyred in a mine shaft in Siberia, to the Queens of Norway, Greece, Romania, and Spain, Queen Victoria’s twenty-two granddaughters lived not only through the halcyon days of the European monarchies but also through tragedy and the horrors of war and revolution. Some, like the unassuming Princess Louise of Wales, lived and died in virtual obscurity while others, like the dazzling Queen Marie of Romania and the ill-fated Empress Alexandra of Russia, played a major and memorable role in world events; but, through all the upheavals and conflicts, and, even when wars had divided their nations, one person had bound them together and, to the end of their lives, all would remember ‘dearest grandmama’ – Queen Victoria – with love.

Most Beautiful Princess

By Christina Croft,

Book cover of Most Beautiful Princess

Don't let the title fool you, this is not a bodice-ripping romance novel by any means. This is a wonderful - and serious - novelization of the life of Grand Duchess Elisabeth of Russia. Clearly well researched, well written, with realistic character development and dialog - a treat for any Russian history or Romanov history buff! 

Who am I?

After a relatively short career in research science, Helen Azar switched gears and returned to graduate school to fulfill a dream of becoming a reference librarian. She worked at the Free Library of Philadelphia for ten years, during which time she became a published author. While researching for her first book, The Diary of Olga Romanov, Helen visited Russia several times, and worked in the Rare Book Fund at the Museum at Tsarskoe Selo, which holds the imperial book collection. Today, Helen lives on the beautiful far south coast of New South Wales, Australia; she continues writing about Russia's last imperial family and leads Romanov history tours. She also administers The Romanov Family website and is the content creator for a YouTube channel In the Steps of the Romanovs.


I wrote...

In the Steps of the Romanovs: Final two years of the last Russian imperial family (1916-1918)

By Helen Azar,

Book cover of In the Steps of the Romanovs: Final two years of the last Russian imperial family (1916-1918)

What is my book about?

By 1916, Russia had been involved in the First World War for almost two years, and events were about to take a tumultuous turn. Tsar Nicholas II was forced to abdicate his throne, and what followed was a struggle that neither he, nor most of his nearest, were destined to survive. This volume offers an accurate glimpse into the final two years of the last Imperial Family of Russia: exclusively through their own diary entries and personal correspondence, supplemented by contemporary eyewitness accounts, many of which are published here in English for the first time.

The reader will get to know on a deeper level the Grand Duchesses and the Empress, as they work at Tsarskoe Selo infirmaries; witness the imperial family's grief for their murdered "Friend" Grigori Rasputin; experience their arrest after the outbreak of the revolution, and follow them into captivity in Siberia - and ultimately the Red Ural - where they meet their tragic end in the cellar of "The House of Special Purpose". This already familiar unique piece of history is individually told by Nicholas, Alexandra, and their five children: Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia, and Alexei. Their collective personal story is a portrayal of a united family bound together by love, hardship, and tragedy, taking place during the twilight of an extraordinary bygone era. 

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