The best books on Provence France

9 authors have picked their favorite books about Provence and why they recommend each book.

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A Year in Provence

By Peter Mayle,

Book cover of A Year in Provence

This is a charming fish-out-of-water adventure. The author has a witty understated style. I enjoyed the tribulations and chaos as he found his way around rural France. The locals in this book felt authentic, which I certainly appreciated. Renovations are hard in a country you know, but this author found humor and understanding, as he floundered around trying to get things done. There’s quite a bit about food, which was entertaining, and is what I would expect in a book set in France. (Personally, I think Italy far outperforms the French when it comes to great food. Give me fresh pasta.) 

A Year in Provence

By Peter Mayle,

Why should I read it?

4 authors picked A Year in Provence as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A personal description of Provencal life as seen through the eyes of the author and his wife when they move into an old farmhouse at the foot of the Luberon mountains between Avignon and Aix. The bestselling work of non-fiction in paperback of 1991 in the UK.


Who am I?

I’m a traveler. For me, there’s nothing like that moment when your plane lands on foreign soil. I feel free when I’m somewhere I’ve never been, where I don’t speak the language, understand the menu, or know a single person. It is the ultimate sense of release. I’ve done a great deal of solo traveling, which I thoroughly enjoy, and fortunately for me, my family understands (or at least accepts). From the Congo to Xian to Paris, I’ve never seen enough. 


I wrote...

2 Broads Abroad: Moms Fly the Coop

By Deborah Serra, Nancy Serra Greene,

Book cover of 2 Broads Abroad: Moms Fly the Coop

What is my book about?

When sisters, Deborah and Nancy, discovered that motherhood was a temp job they decided to run away from home. It happened right after the kids moved out, and Nancy’s husband found her weeping nostalgically in front of the acne wipes, while Deborah’s husband arrived home to learn their house was for sale. 2 Broads Abroad is a funny, irreverent, occasionally poignant, always enjoyable, travel tale of the sisters’ impulsive, and unexpectedly comic, road trip around Ireland.

The Passion of Dolssa

By Julie Berry,

Book cover of The Passion of Dolssa

A healer and a matchmaker cross paths in 12th century France, and….zzzzzzz, right? Or so I thought, until I tried this Printz honor book, a piece of gorgeously written historical fiction that turned out to be a complete page-turner and attention-grabbing thriller. I’m a big TV watcher, so when I say that I was turning off the TV at night to spend more time with this book, you can take that as a 5+ star review. It’s one of my favorite YAs, and for what it’s worth, could just as easily have been shelved as an adult title. 

The Passion of Dolssa

By Julie Berry,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Passion of Dolssa as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The Printz Honor winner that garnered five starred reviews and was hailed by the New York Times as "magnificent"!

Dolssa is an upper-crust city girl who's been branded a heretic, on the run from the friar who condemned her mother to death by fire and wants Dolssa executed, too. Botille is a matchmaker and a tavern-keeper, struggling to keep herself and her sisters on the right side of the law in their seaside town. When their lives collide by a dark riverside, Botille rescues a dying Dolssa and conceals her in the tavern, where an unlikely friendship blooms. Aided by…


Who am I?

When I was pitching my then novel-in-progress, Me, Myself, and Him to editors and agents, I usually got one of two responses: either “That sounds like a tough sell” or “That sounds great, and not like anything I’ve seen before.” Of course, I preferred to hear the latter, but I also enjoyed winning over skeptics by giving them something much more accessible than they might have expected, based on my pitch. It all speaks to the special place I have in my heart for the books you never expect to love…and then love anyway.


I wrote...

Me Myself & Him

By Chris Tebbetts,

Book cover of Me Myself & Him

What is my book about?

When Chris Schweitzer takes a hit of whippets and passes out face first on the cement, his nose isn’t the only thing that changes forever. For the last summer after high school, he’s shipped off to live with his famous physicist but jerk of a father to prove he can “play by the rules” before Dad will pay for college. Or...not.

In an alternate timeline, Chris’s parents remain blissfully ignorant about the accident, and life at home goes back to normal–until it doesn’t. A new spark between his two best (straight) friends quickly turns Chris into a (gay) third wheel, and even worse, the truth about the whippets incident starts to unravel. Is it possible to be jealous of another version of yourself in an alternate reality that doesn’t even exist?

A Good Year

By Peter Mayle,

Book cover of A Good Year

This story, primarily set in France, is about a guy who loses his job in Great Britain and inherits his uncle’s vineyard in Provence. There are quirky scenes in this book that make you laugh out loud, and scenes that tug at your heartstrings. Years ago, I spent a little time in France and remember looking longingly at French wine country—from the windows of a train, and wishing I could hop off and visit some of those beautiful places. Isn’t that why we love books? We can travel vicariously! 

A Good Year

By Peter Mayle,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Good Year as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Max Skinner is a man at the heart of London's financial universe until his employers embark on a little asset-stripping of their own. Himself. Amid the grey London drizzle, there is one potential ray of sunshine: Max's Uncle Harry has left him his estate in his will - an eighteenth-century chateau and vineyard an hour's drive from Avignon. Out of a job, and encouraged by his friend Charlie about the money in modern wine, he heads for France.

What Max discovers is a beautiful house, wonderful weather and a bustling village. The downside is the quality of the wine in…


Who am I?

The first time I visited a vineyard was as a child with my mother and grandparents. Driving to San Francisco from Oregon, we stopped to tour a Sonoma vineyard and winery there. Later, as a young adult touring Western Europe, I became intrigued by the vineyards there. Something about the beauty of gently rolling slopes of green vines tugged on me. And I found the science and art of winemaking fascinating. Even the history of wine-making is noteworthy. And I love that Jesus’ first miracle was transforming ordinary water into extraordinary wine. So using the setting of a vineyard for my novel just felt right. And it was a fun adventure!


I wrote...

Looking for Leroy

By Melody Carlson,

Book cover of Looking for Leroy

What is my book about?

Brynna Philips is ready to give up on love. But when her fellow teacher invites her on a camping trip through Sonoma wine country, she’s reminded of her first crush, a young man named Leroy, whose family owned a vineyard down there. Is there any chance she can find him...and one last chance for love? “No one writes clean, contemporary romance like Carlson, who delivers another winner with this novel...Hallmark will be salivating over this script. With plenty of humorous encounters, delightful misunderstandings, and realistic characters, this is one to hand to readers looking for a fun read with a hint of faith.” Library Journal

My Father's Glory & My Mother's Castle

By Marcel Pagnol, Rita Barisse (translator),

Book cover of My Father's Glory & My Mother's Castle: Marcel Pagnol's Memories of Childhood

No one wrote about the South of France with more affection and understanding than Marcel Pagnol. He was a novelist, playwright, director, and memoirist. Pagnol’s family had a small house in the hills near Marseille where they spent summers. His book, My Father’s Glory, is about those months Pagnol spent there as a child and about his family, mostly his father. (The companion book, My Mother’s Castle, concerns his mother more.) The story of his aunt’s sweet, delicate courtship with his eventual uncle is worth reading the book alone. If you’re like me, you will come away from reading this book wishing you’d been part of Pagnol’s kind and joyous family and his life in this little corner of France. The good news is that with this book, you very nearly are.

My Father's Glory & My Mother's Castle

By Marcel Pagnol, Rita Barisse (translator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked My Father's Glory & My Mother's Castle as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Bathed in the warm clarity of the summer sun in Provence, Marcel Pagnol's childhood memories celebrate a time of rare beauty and delight.Called by Jean Renoir "the leading film artist of his age," Pagnol is best known for such films as The Baker's Wife, Harvest, Fanny, and Topaze, as well as the screen adaptations of his novels Jean de Florette and Manon of the Springs (North Point, 1988). But he never forgot the magic of his Provencal childhood, and when he set his memories to paper late in life the result was a great new success. My Father's Glory and…


Who am I?

I’m a writer and a teacher of writing who fell in love with France after my first visit fifty years ago. I was lucky enough once to spend a year in a small village about thirty miles west of Avignon in the south where I was able to observe, and eventually participate in, the daily life of this village. I wrote my book, French Dirt, about that experience. I have read intently about the South of France ever since with an eye for those books that truly capture the spirit and character of these people who are the heart of this storied part of France.


I wrote...

French Dirt: The Story of a Garden in the South of France

By Richard Goodman,

Book cover of French Dirt: The Story of a Garden in the South of France

What is my book about?

I went to a small village outside of time in the South of France to live for a year. The village was so small it didn’t have a cafe or shop of any kind. The population was 211. While I was there, I had a vegetable garden. Every day, when I came back from working in the Provençal sun, I wrote about what I saw. French Dirt is the result of those days spent digging and planting, hoping and despairing. It’s about the villagers I met and the help, advice, and cautions they gave me. It’s a book about sun, light, work, sweat, and the sublime pleasure of working the French soil, alone and happy, day after glorious day.

Caesar's Vast Ghost

By Lawrence Durrell,

Book cover of Caesar's Vast Ghost: Aspects of Provence

Provence has inspired hundreds of books, but Lawrence Durrell captures better than most what he calls its 'real nature'. His book is both personal response (he lived for many years at Sommières, north of Nimes) and historical reflection, particularly on the Roman legacy – a legacy that includes wine and olive oil, perennial staples of the Provençal table. Although Caesar occupied the whole of France, nowhere is the Roman imprint more omnipresent than in Provence; living near Carpentras, we daily dreamed of finding our fortune in an ancient Roman coin, shining through the dust of a lonely track. Durrell's language is poetic, his imagery evocative: the 'Socratic austerity' of a game of boules, the 'felicity and eloquence' of Provençal skies. As a companion to Provence, Durrell is my pick.

Caesar's Vast Ghost

By Lawrence Durrell,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Caesar's Vast Ghost as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Lose yourself in this classic travelogue evoking the idyllic South of France by the king of travel writing and real-life family member of The Durrells in Corfu.

'Full of stories, landscapes, comedy, history, heresies, animals, food, drink, and songs of the Midi.' Patrick Leigh Fermor

'A richly characteristic bouillabaisse by our last great garlicky master of the vanishing Mediterranean, our old Prospero of the south.' Richard Holmes

Provence, Southern France. Celebrated writer and poet Lawrence Durrell made the Midi his home for more than thirty years: and in his final book, he shares his most evocative, dazzling memories of life…


Who am I?

Since first stepping off a train at Nice I've felt an affinity with southern France, but it was a chance encounter with the local shepherd who, speaking a version of the Provençal language, alerted me to the proud past of this region and its individual identity. (I've written about this time in my book Wild Asparagus, Wild Strawberries.) A serendipitous opportunity to study ancien Provençal led me down a meandering path to a PhD that eventually became The Original Mediterranean Cuisine, and on to a career researching and teaching culinary history. My next book looks at the roots of Provençal cuisine in the eighteenth century. 


I wrote...

The Original Mediterranean Cuisine: Medieval Recipes for Today

By Barbara Santich,

Book cover of The Original Mediterranean Cuisine: Medieval Recipes for Today

What is my book about?

Before tomatoes, before peppers, before polenta, the Mediterranean fringe of Europe shared a common culinary culture that was distinctively different than that of northern Europe. Despite the prominence these new introduced foods now enjoy, older traditions still persist in dishes such as Sicilian maccu and Catalan bunyols. Fascinated by the languages of the Mediterranean, I set out to research this earlier, pre-Columbus cuisine and discovered roots in both Roman and Arabic cultures. The Original Mediterranean Cuisine describes how these influences came together in the medieval era and illustrates their intersection in a selection of recipes, sourced from medieval Italian and Catalan manuscripts and adapted to modern kitchens.  

Provence, 1970

By Luke Barr,

Book cover of Provence, 1970: M.F.K. Fisher, Julia Child, James Beard, and the Reinvention of American Taste

In December 1970, a group of acclaimed American culinary experts met in Provence, where Julia Child had a holiday house, planning to celebrate Christmas together. Joining them were food writer Richard Olney and novelists Sybille Bedford and Eda Lord, all living relatively close. Barr, Fisher's grandnephew relies on her journal and letters to recreate their sumptuous tables in delectable detail. Alas, hopes for a joyous gathering of friends soured as egos clashed and petty rivalries intervened; MFK left abruptly and spent Christmas alone in Avignon. What interests me is how these authorities on French cuisine engaged with the French, the relationship between the 'French' cooking they portrayed and the food of the French, and their response to the changes creeping into France post-1968.

Provence, 1970

By Luke Barr,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Provence, 1970 as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Provence, 1970 is about a singular historic moment. In the winter of that year, more or less coincidentally, the iconic culinary figures James Beard, M.F.K. Fisher, Julia Child, Richard Olney, Simone Beck, and Judith Jones found themselves together in the South of France. They cooked and ate, talked and argued, about the future of food in America, the meaning of taste, and the limits of snobbery. Without quite realizing it, they were shaping today’s tastes and culture, the way we eat now. The conversations among this group were chronicled by M.F.K. Fisher in journals and letters—some of which were later…


Who am I?

Since first stepping off a train at Nice I've felt an affinity with southern France, but it was a chance encounter with the local shepherd who, speaking a version of the Provençal language, alerted me to the proud past of this region and its individual identity. (I've written about this time in my book Wild Asparagus, Wild Strawberries.) A serendipitous opportunity to study ancien Provençal led me down a meandering path to a PhD that eventually became The Original Mediterranean Cuisine, and on to a career researching and teaching culinary history. My next book looks at the roots of Provençal cuisine in the eighteenth century. 


I wrote...

The Original Mediterranean Cuisine: Medieval Recipes for Today

By Barbara Santich,

Book cover of The Original Mediterranean Cuisine: Medieval Recipes for Today

What is my book about?

Before tomatoes, before peppers, before polenta, the Mediterranean fringe of Europe shared a common culinary culture that was distinctively different than that of northern Europe. Despite the prominence these new introduced foods now enjoy, older traditions still persist in dishes such as Sicilian maccu and Catalan bunyols. Fascinated by the languages of the Mediterranean, I set out to research this earlier, pre-Columbus cuisine and discovered roots in both Roman and Arabic cultures. The Original Mediterranean Cuisine describes how these influences came together in the medieval era and illustrates their intersection in a selection of recipes, sourced from medieval Italian and Catalan manuscripts and adapted to modern kitchens.  

Lulu's Provençal Table

By Richard Olney,

Book cover of Lulu's Provençal Table: The Food and Wine from Domaine Tempier Vineyard

Of that group of 1970 expats, only Richard Olney made France his home. Settling in Provence, he enjoyed Lulu's legendary hospitality at the Peyraud family vineyard Domaine Tempier, at nearby Bandol, and spent many hours in her kitchen recording her recipes and culinary tips ('lots of garlic'). To me, Lulu's recipes represent the heart and soul of gastronomic Provence, with direct lineage to the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, such as her Daube à la Provençale with its obligatory accompaniment of macaroni. Essentially simple, her cuisine revels in the robust accents of anchovies and garlic, thyme and savory as it celebrates seasonal and local—if not quite so local as her own backyard, like our landlady on the cherry orchard near Carpentras. 

Lulu's Provençal Table

By Richard Olney,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Lulu's Provençal Table as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A food writer and editor of the Time-Life cooking series shares stories and recipes from his friendship with a legendary Provençal chef and vineyard owner.
 
Of all of the culinary treasures that Richard Olney brought home from France for his American audience, the spritely and commanding Lulu Peyraud is perhaps the most memorable. A second-generation proprietor of Provence’s noted vineyard Domaine Tempier, and producer of some of the region’s best wines and meals, Lulu has for more than fifty years been Provence’s best-kept secret. Mother of seven, Lulu still owns and operates Domaine Tempier with her family, serving up wit…


Who am I?

Since first stepping off a train at Nice I've felt an affinity with southern France, but it was a chance encounter with the local shepherd who, speaking a version of the Provençal language, alerted me to the proud past of this region and its individual identity. (I've written about this time in my book Wild Asparagus, Wild Strawberries.) A serendipitous opportunity to study ancien Provençal led me down a meandering path to a PhD that eventually became The Original Mediterranean Cuisine, and on to a career researching and teaching culinary history. My next book looks at the roots of Provençal cuisine in the eighteenth century. 


I wrote...

The Original Mediterranean Cuisine: Medieval Recipes for Today

By Barbara Santich,

Book cover of The Original Mediterranean Cuisine: Medieval Recipes for Today

What is my book about?

Before tomatoes, before peppers, before polenta, the Mediterranean fringe of Europe shared a common culinary culture that was distinctively different than that of northern Europe. Despite the prominence these new introduced foods now enjoy, older traditions still persist in dishes such as Sicilian maccu and Catalan bunyols. Fascinated by the languages of the Mediterranean, I set out to research this earlier, pre-Columbus cuisine and discovered roots in both Roman and Arabic cultures. The Original Mediterranean Cuisine describes how these influences came together in the medieval era and illustrates their intersection in a selection of recipes, sourced from medieval Italian and Catalan manuscripts and adapted to modern kitchens.  

Song at Dawn

By Jean Gill,

Book cover of Song at Dawn: 1150 in Provence

Book 1 in Gill’s Troubadour series opens in Provence, in 1150. A young runaway wakes in a ditch protected by a huge white dog. The girl becomes the celebrated lutist Estela at the court of Alienor of Aquitaine. Her tutor, then lover, is the Queen’s finest troubadour, Dragonetz los Pros. Using Jewish money and Moorish expertise, Dragonetz builds a paper mill, bringing him into desperate conflict with the Christian Church. This is a compelling story woven into real events: the writing is captivating, the history fascinating. Jean Gill is one of those authors who can ‘take you there’. I was watching what was happening and fearing for the safety of the protagonists to the last page. History, action, and a not-too-treacly romance. A great read all round.

Song at Dawn

By Jean Gill,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Song at Dawn as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Award-winning historical fiction. Like Game of Thrones with real history.
'Believable, page-turning and memorable.' Lela Michael, S.P. Review
1150: Provence, where making love and making paper are crimes against the Church.
Death on her heels, Estela runs towards a new identity. Her life depends on her golden voice and the patronage of
Eleanor of Aquitaine but her heart cares more for the judgement of her tutor, Dragonetz, a cynical ex-crusader. He knows he must not love this troublesome student but their duet makes its own demands.
Will their secrets kill them both? The troubadours, Dragonetz and Estela, are an explosive…


Who am I?

My idea of ‘good fiction’ – and what I try to write myself – involves secret agents and skulduggery, crime, and romance. My own life has involved a good deal of travel. I studied Education and Drama, then Literature, History, and Politics at post-graduate level. All of which help with my research and writing. As a British ex-pat, I have lived in the USA and different parts of Europe. Now, we are finally settled near Málaga, Spain. ‘Deep-reading’ fiction set in fascinating places, quality content to indulge in on dark winter nights. I hope you enjoy your time travel as much as I do.


I wrote...

The Chosen Man

By J.G. Harlond,

Book cover of The Chosen Man

What is my book about?

Book 1 in The Chosen Man Trilogy

Europe, 1635. Charismatic Genoese merchant, occasional pirate, and professional rogue Ludo da Portovenere endeavours to fulfill a highly secret Vatican commission on his own terms. But as he nears success, Ludo must confront secrets of his own, an inconvenient romance, and an implacable assassin on a personal vendetta. Readers' Favorite 5* & Discovered Diamond Award.

Jean de Florette

By Marcel Pagnol,

Book cover of Jean de Florette

This is a pair of novels, French classics that were also made into two memorable movies. In a rural village in Provence, an old man and his only remaining relative cast a greedy eyes on some land. They need a hidden spring that is on the land to irrigate the flowers they intend to grow which they think will make them a fortune. But first, they need to drive out the owner and his family.The father of this family is a hunchback trying to succeed in a hostile world. An evil plot slowly unfolds and comes to tragic fruition. Ten years later, the daughter of the family returns to seek her revenge. A moral tale full of wonderful local detail, like my other choices it features a brave, invincible female protagonist battling overwhelming odds. 

Jean de Florette

By Marcel Pagnol,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Jean de Florette as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Marcel Pagnol
Jean de Florette

Au village des Bastides Blanches, on hait ceux de Crespin. C’est pourquoi lorsque Jean Cadoret, le Bossu, s’installe à la ferme des Romarins, on ne lui parle pas de la source cachée. Ce qui facilite les manœuvres des Soubeyran, le Papet et son neveu Ugolin, qui veulent lui racheter son domaine à bas prix…

Jean de Florette (1962), premier volume de L’Eau des collines, marque, trente ans après Pirouettes, le retour de Pagnol au roman. C’est l’épopée de l’eau nourricière sans laquelle rien n’est possible.


Who am I?

For a long time I’ve been fascinated by the challenge of writing novels with strong female protagonists—this is what I set out to do with my books Romance Language and The Diplomatic Coup. Is a male author capable of doing this? Read the books and judge for yourself. I’m fascinated by history, politics, and the pursuit of power both in real life and fiction. Lately, I’ve become more alarmed about the threat posed to the world by a resurgent Russia determined to undermine western democracy and that interest also influenced my choices. As a former journalist, I covered some of the world’s most important leaders and biggest stories and got to see them operating firsthand. 


I wrote...

The Diplomatic Coup

By Alan Elsner,

Book cover of The Diplomatic Coup

What is my book about?

The Diplomatic Coup is a thriller with a strong female protagonist based on the life of a reporter covering the US State Department. It is eerily prophetic featuring a politician with no regard for democracy determined to use any and all means to seize power. Written by a former State Department correspondent, this book is full of authentic detail. What's it like to travel on the plane of the Secretary of State, to file stories under pressure, to attend press conferences with heads of state? Only someone who has really been there can answer these questions. It also features a sweet and unusual love affair and a pounding climax.

Mediterranean Seafood

By Alan Davidson,

Book cover of Mediterranean Seafood: A Comprehensive Guide With Recipes

Finally, a food book. But more than that, Mediterranean Seafood recounts a personal journey, as Alan Davidson learned to identify the diversity of Mediterranean catches and how best to use each species. It was an invaluable guide on my visits to the market at Sète, and as I pored over the displays I listened to conversations between sellers and buyers, exchanges of gossip and cooking tips, and marvelled at the ingenuity of these Mediterranean women in accommodating seafood in so many different ways when my palate knew only fried or grilled. Part catalogue and part cookbook, it combines the best of both. If only eighteenth-century travellers had the benefit of such a guide, they might have been more daring in their eating. 

Mediterranean Seafood

By Alan Davidson,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Mediterranean Seafood as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Mediterranean seafood is a topic as vast as the riches of that fabled sea itself. Written by distinguished food historian Alan Davidson (author of The Oxford Companion to Food), MEDITERRANEAN SEAFOOD is a seminal work of culinary scholarship. The new edition catalogs edible marine life and provides identifications in a dozen languages and over 100 line drawings. Davidson puts knowledge into practice with 240 skillfully presented recipes, culled from cuisines throughout the region. Davidson'¬?s work possesses the quixotic charm of the true enthusiast; his practical discussions are enlivened by touches of witty erudition that will delight those new to the…


Who am I?

Since first stepping off a train at Nice I've felt an affinity with southern France, but it was a chance encounter with the local shepherd who, speaking a version of the Provençal language, alerted me to the proud past of this region and its individual identity. (I've written about this time in my book Wild Asparagus, Wild Strawberries.) A serendipitous opportunity to study ancien Provençal led me down a meandering path to a PhD that eventually became The Original Mediterranean Cuisine, and on to a career researching and teaching culinary history. My next book looks at the roots of Provençal cuisine in the eighteenth century. 


I wrote...

The Original Mediterranean Cuisine: Medieval Recipes for Today

By Barbara Santich,

Book cover of The Original Mediterranean Cuisine: Medieval Recipes for Today

What is my book about?

Before tomatoes, before peppers, before polenta, the Mediterranean fringe of Europe shared a common culinary culture that was distinctively different than that of northern Europe. Despite the prominence these new introduced foods now enjoy, older traditions still persist in dishes such as Sicilian maccu and Catalan bunyols. Fascinated by the languages of the Mediterranean, I set out to research this earlier, pre-Columbus cuisine and discovered roots in both Roman and Arabic cultures. The Original Mediterranean Cuisine describes how these influences came together in the medieval era and illustrates their intersection in a selection of recipes, sourced from medieval Italian and Catalan manuscripts and adapted to modern kitchens.  

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