The best books about King George III

8 authors have picked their favorite books about King George III and why they recommend each book.

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In These Times

By Jenny Uglow,

Book cover of In These Times: Living in Britain Through Napoleon's Wars, 1793-1815

Jenny Uglow looks at the Napoleonic Wars period from the bottom up -- what life was like, how political issues affected the person in the street. Bankers, clergymen, working men and women, manufacturers, and statesmen all play roles in her narrative. Through the letters and diaries of ordinary people, she produces a vibrant picture of life in a period of unprecedented political, social, and economic turmoil. She still ends with the Battle of Waterloo, but Waterloo as experienced by the junior officers and enlisted men. A fascinating book, that shows how high politics and world events affected ordinary people and is highly accessible to general readers.


Who am I?

More than 40 years ago, I first started writing a book on great ‘Tory’ leaders throughout history, several of whom were inexorably tied to this Regency period. Having never lost interest in the topic I continued to study the period and its political life and found a way to parlay experience from my career in finance and international business into a biography of the most economically proficient Prime Minister Britain has ever had. Research for that biography as well as for future Industrial Revolution-related books on which I am currently working has resulted in a broad and fruitful list of books on the period's politics.


I wrote...

Britain's Greatest Prime Minister: Lord Liverpool

By Martin Hutchinson,

Book cover of Britain's Greatest Prime Minister: Lord Liverpool

What is my book about?

Britain’s Greatest Prime Minister: Lord Liverpool unpicks two centuries of Whig history to redeem Lord Liverpool (1770-1828) from ‘arch-mediocrity’ and establish him as the greatest political leader the country has ever seen. Past biographers of Lord Liverpool have not sufficiently acknowledged the importance of his foremost skill: economic policy (including fiscal, monetary, and banking system questions). Here, Hutchinson’s experience in the finance sector provides a specialised perspective on Liverpool’s economic legacy.

From his adept handling of unparalleled economic and social difficulties, to his strategic defeat of Napoleon and unprecedented approach to the subsequent peace process, Liverpool is shown to have set Britain’s course for prosperity and effective government for the following century. In addition to picking apart his domestic and foreign policy, Hutchinson advances how a proper regard for Liverpool’s career might have changed the structure and policies of today’s government for the better.

What Angels Fear

By C.S. Harris,

Book cover of What Angels Fear: A Sebastian St. Cyr Mystery

This is my personal favorite of the Regency mystery series. The author is a thorough researcher weaving interesting details into her stories without large information dumps, and she is a master at creating relatable characters. Each plot has plenty of twists to keep you turning the pages.

In book one, Sebastian is accused of murdering a young woman and forced to evade the Bow Street Runners in order to prove his innocence. There is a fascinating group of minor characters who reoccur throughout the series. Don’t pass this one by.


Who am I?

I have been a mystery fan all my life and an avid reader of Regency fiction—from the mystery authors I’ve recommended to early Regency romance writers, including Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer. When I visited England a few years ago, I dragged my travel companion to all the Regency landmarks left standing and nearly missed a tour bus because I just had to see a Regency assembly room where their dances were held! When I switched from writing fantasy (under the pen name Ally Shields) to writing historical mysteries in 2019, I spent hundreds of hours devouring non-fiction books on this fascinating period of Prince George’s regency (1811-1820).


I wrote...

The Dead Betray None

By Janet L. Buck,

Book cover of The Dead Betray None

What is my book about?

England, 1811. Lucien, Viscount Ware, has recently returned from four years of spying for England on the Continent. Finding themselves restless in the world of the haut ton, he and his fellow agent Andrew Sherbourne agree to secret spy work for the Crown at home and are given the task of locating a stolen code, the key to unlocking Napoleon's war documents. 

Lady Anne Ashburn comes to London to retrieve her cousin's love letters from a blackmailer. Lucien and Lady Anne come face-to-face over a dead body at the Christmastide Ball. What follows—the risks they take, the intrusion of a notorious crime lord, society gossip, and good intentions gone awry—sends them spiraling into danger and potential disaster for England’s war effort.

George vs. George

By Rosalyn Schanzer,

Book cover of George vs. George: The American Revolution as Seen from Both Sides

You’ve heard the saying, “There are two sides to every story.” Well, that’s what this author did. She presented both sides of the story of the American Revolution from George Washington’s side in America to King George III’s side in England. Real quotes used in speech balloons add another layer to the historic facts in this book. This is for older kids, 9-12. There are gory details of war (including rape) so just warning you. Kids will have a deeper understanding of what lengths the troops went through to carry on and win the Revolutionary War. Excellent afterward tells what each man did after the war. 


Who am I?

I love relearning history I learned way back in high school and looking at it with wiser eyes. I wanted to pay tribute to both the Founding Fathers and Mothers since it took quite a few brave, smart and determined people to figure out how the new nation of the United States of America would operate. After watching the musical, Hamilton, I was curious to discover more about some of the characters. That’s what’s so great about children’s books – they can be used to extend and deepen the learning process for kids and adults.


I wrote...

The Story of Eliza Hamilton: A Biography Book for New Readers

By Natasha Wing,

Book cover of The Story of Eliza Hamilton: A Biography Book for New Readers

What is my book about?

The Story of Eliza Hamilton is an exploration of how Eliza went from a young girl during colonial times to an important keeper of history. She was married to Alexander Hamilton, a Founding Father who helped form the United States. After he died in a duel, she lived for another 50 years and started an orphanage and free school. It is because of Eliza that we know so much about Alexander and his place in history.

Slammerkin

By Emma Donoghue,

Book cover of Slammerkin

Maybe it’s because of my working-class roots, but Mary Saunders, an obscure but very real historical figure, is the sort of woman I wanted to root for. After all, it takes initiative, ingenuity, and not a small dose of impetuosity to rise from a lower-class schoolgirl to, well, some higher station. I was saddened to see how Mary’s yearnings to free herself from the shackles of her class forced her into prostitution at a young age. But when she made a dangerous misstep that set her on the run and landed her a position of a household seamstress, I couldn’t help but fear the worst for her. I was glued to the page in Emma Donoghue’s rich and provocative tale of this young girl’s quest for a better life.

Who am I?

Ever since I stumbled across the story of May Dugas, who the Pinkertons described as “the most dangerous woman in the world,” I’ve been fascinated by women who were born into lowly circumstances and yearned to better themselves. How far were they willing to go to rise above their station? This question takes on added weight for women in earlier eras—when women’s choices and opportunities were limited. So I’ve long been attracted to historical fiction that examines just these questions. And I’ve enjoyed hearing readers’ reactions to May’s story when I visit book clubs. What reader isn’t fascinated by stories of transgression and daring?

I wrote...

Parlor Games

By Maryka Biaggio,

Book cover of Parlor Games

What is my book about?

The Pinkertons branded her a crafty blackmailer, but to her Dutch Baron husband she was the most glamorous woman to grace Europe’s shores. Was the real May Dugas a cold-hearted enchantress, an able provider for her poor family, or a free-spirited globe-trotter? Parlor Games is based on the true story of the woman who made headlines not only in her Michigan hometown, but also in New York and London.

Blood & Sugar

By Laura Shepherd-Robinson,

Book cover of Blood & Sugar

Winner of the Historical Writers’ Association Debut Crown Award, Blood & Sugar is a page-turner of a crime thriller set in London and Greenwich 1781. Captain Harry Corsham must discover why his old friend the abolitionist Tad Archer was murdered. Corsham’s quest may do irreparable damage to the slave trade. I live in Greenwich, much of which is unchanged architecturally since the eighteenth century. Walking the streets portrayed in the novel brings alive that world. Slave trade monuments are currently being taken down in the UK and US and Blood & Sugar depicts the beginnings of that emotional and necessary journey.


Who am I?

Like many readers, I am fascinated by strong creative women in the past and how their lives can inspire women today. As an academic, before my Creative Writing Diploma and transformation to a creative writer, I taught historical novels of many kinds. I now enjoy devising fascinating women whose lives have significant importance for today’s issues. To talk about my favourite historical figure Virginia Woolf, I have had invitations from galleries and universities around the world, including several in the US and Europe, as well as Brazil, Egypt, Israel, Mexico, and Norway. France Culture and Arte TV, and Turkey TRT Television also featured my writing. 


I wrote...

Talland House

By Maggie Humm,

Book cover of Talland House

What is my book about?

The heroine is Lily Briscoe taken from Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse. Set between 1900 and 1919 in picturesque Cornwall and war-blasted London, Talland House depicts Lily’s emotional journey in becoming a professional artist: her loves and friendships, mourning her dead mother, and solving the mystery of Mrs. Ramsay’s sudden and suspicious death. 

Talland House was shortlisted for many prizes including: Impress, Fresher Fiction, Retreat West, and Eyelands, and longlisted by the Historical Writers Association. Talland House was also one of the Washington Independent Review of Books ‘51 Favorite Books of 2020′, and 2021 Next Generation Indie Book Awards Finalist in Historical Fiction (post 1900s). 2021 Eric Hoffer Award Grand Prize Short List.

The Club

By Leo Damrosch,

Book cover of The Club: Johnson, Boswell, and the Friends Who Shaped an Age

A book about a group of London intellectuals – sometimes friends, sometimes frenemies – who expressed their influential ideas with an elegant style that I find irresistible. (Dr. Johnson strongly influenced Jane Austen, so if you like Austen, you’ll like Johnson.) This book is filled with anecdotes of friendships, rivalries, partying, and bickering, with a fair amount of Georgian bawdy humor sprinkled throughout. You’ll meet writers, poets, playwrights, legislators, and bluestockings. The Club gives you multiple biographies plus a portrait of London in the late Georgian period. Spending time with this book is like spending a few hours with Dr. Johnson and his witty friends at a London coffeehouse.


Who am I?

I’m a writer of Jane Austen-inspired fiction who fell down a research rabbit hole and perhaps I’ll never climb out. Dr. Johnson said, “The greatest part of a writer's time is spent in reading… a man will turn over half a library to make one book.” The five books I’m recommending offer a window into the long 18th century, the era of the Enlightenment, and the dawn of the industrial revolution. In these books I’ve met philosophers, romantics, and reformers who brought literacy to the underclass and emancipation to the enslaved. These books have helped me place the characters of my novels within a fascinating, consequential period of history. 


I wrote...

A Contrary Wind: A Variation on Mansfield Park

By Lona Manning,

Book cover of A Contrary Wind: A Variation on Mansfield Park

What is my book about?

Fanny Price, an intelligent but timid girl from a poor family, lives at Mansfield Park with her wealthy cousins. But the cruelty of her Aunt Norris, together with a broken heart, compel Fanny to run away and take a job as a governess. Far away from everything she ever knew and the man she secretly loves, will Fanny grow in strength and confidence? Will a new suitor help her to forget her past? Or will a reckless decision ruin the lives of those she holds most dear? 

Saving Shadow

By Laura Beers,

Book cover of Saving Shadow: A Regency Spy Romance

For England's top spy, love is not an option. Well, that’s at least what the main character thinks, but Eliza quickly discovers that the partner she is paired up with makes falling in love suddenly a very possible option. It is a very interesting and captivating story with a twist because Lady Eliza happens to be the daughter of a duke, yet a secret spy for the crown. Her code name: Shadow. It is an action-packed story that keeps you on the edge of your seat while falling in love with the characters and swooning along the way. A must-read for regency lovers with the hint-feel of a thriller.


Who am I?

Ever since I can remember I had a special love for western romance books. My mom has written several books set in 1800s America and that probably stirred me in that direction as well since I love her books (they're in German, which is why I couldn’t recommend them). Regency has become my second historical fiction genre, which is probably why I write and read both time periods. I'm a German-born US-Indie author and total romance fanatic. I write Christian Romance set mostly in the above time periods. I'm a massive Harry Potter fan, have been married to my husband for nearly 18 years and we have two teenage sons. 

I wrote...

Healing the Orphaned Heart

By Rebecca Lange,

Book cover of Healing the Orphaned Heart

What is my book about?

A move across the country... A dowry that turns into a curse... A marshal that captures her heart...

After her father’s death, Rose is sent to live with her uncle and his family, whom she hasn’t seen in over twelve years. Terrified of the reception she’ll receive, Rose makes the journey alone and quickly realizes that her late father’s wealth has made her a target for not just journalists but dowry hunters everywhere. Will her relatives in Colorado take her in with open arms, or was this arrangement forced on them, and would it turn into another disappointment? And, is Rose’s future already sealed by a parade of lies, or is there hope for a happy ending and the healing of her orphaned heart?

Those Rebels, John & Tom

By Barbara Kerley, Edwin Fotheringham (illustrator),

Book cover of Those Rebels, John & Tom

Here’s another take on America’s relationship with King George III. The story shows the differences between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson but despite their differences, they have a love of country and a hate for King George. They unite their strengths - John’s power of persuasion and Tom’s mighty pen - to formulate the Declaration of Independence. The endnotes are just as fascinating, talking about how their relationship continued - and almost ended. They both died on the same day, on July 4th.


Who am I?

I love relearning history I learned way back in high school and looking at it with wiser eyes. I wanted to pay tribute to both the Founding Fathers and Mothers since it took quite a few brave, smart and determined people to figure out how the new nation of the United States of America would operate. After watching the musical, Hamilton, I was curious to discover more about some of the characters. That’s what’s so great about children’s books – they can be used to extend and deepen the learning process for kids and adults.


I wrote...

The Story of Eliza Hamilton: A Biography Book for New Readers

By Natasha Wing,

Book cover of The Story of Eliza Hamilton: A Biography Book for New Readers

What is my book about?

The Story of Eliza Hamilton is an exploration of how Eliza went from a young girl during colonial times to an important keeper of history. She was married to Alexander Hamilton, a Founding Father who helped form the United States. After he died in a duel, she lived for another 50 years and started an orphanage and free school. It is because of Eliza that we know so much about Alexander and his place in history.

1774

By Mary Beth Norton,

Book cover of 1774: The Long Year of Revolution

George Washington didn’t sign the Declaration of Independence because he was already too busy fighting for it. Americans have become so focused on 1776, but the American Revolution was a long time coming. Mary Beth Norton does an excellent job of focusing on a pivotal year. 


Who am I?

Alexis Coe is a presidential historian and the New York Times bestselling author of You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington, which was also Audible’s best history book of 2020 and Barnes and Nobel's nonfiction Book of the Month. She was a producer and appeared in Doris Kearns Goodwin's Washington series on the History Channel.


I wrote...

You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington

By Alexis Coe,

Book cover of You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington

What is my book about?

Young George Washington was raised by a struggling single mother, demanded military promotions, caused an international incident, and never backed down--even when his dysentery got so bad he had to ride with a cushion on his saddle. But after he married Martha, everything changed. Washington became the kind of man who named his dog Sweetlips and hated to leave home. He took up arms against the British only when there was no other way, though he lost more battles than he won.

With irresistible style and warm humor, You Never Forget Your First combines rigorous research and lively storytelling that will have readers--including those who thought presidential biographies were just for dads--inhaling every page.

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