10 books like The Pyramids and Temples of Gizeh

By William Matthew Flinders Petrie,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like The Pyramids and Temples of Gizeh. Shepherd is a community of 7,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Holy Bible

By Unknown,

Book cover of Holy Bible

It is the foundation of every story – believer or not – the battle between good and evil, love and hate, life and death, redemption and condemnation, mercy and wrath…

As a Christian, I have struggled with my faith, especially after a loss, and instead of turning away from God, I dove in heart first, for understanding, for answers.

It’s the book I have always turned to, no matter how young I was, or how old I get.

It taught me everything, from standing up for what I believe in…even if it’s alone; to sacrifice; to living a righteous life, and to not fear death.

Holy Bible

By Unknown,

Why should I read it?

4 authors picked Holy Bible as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

With an attractive new slipcase and binding, this compact Bible is an ideal gift and spiritual companion.

The full text of the ever-popular Authorized King James Version Bible, with all its literary beauty and poetic grandeur, in an attractive size and with beautiful binding and slipcase
making it an ideal gift.

Includes silver gilt edged pages and white marker ribbon.


Lost Technologies of Ancient Egypt

By Christopher Dunn,

Book cover of Lost Technologies of Ancient Egypt: Advanced Engineering in the Temples of the Pharaohs

I was well on with my book before I discovered Christopher Dunn, an English Aerospace engineer working in America. I give Dunn credibility because, as an engineer, he has got his hands dirty by physically checking out most of what I am talking about. This book is a very detailed, well-illustrated, look at the engineering aspect of the ancient world. His findings prove conclusively that many items found in Egypt can only have been made using technology that is only just being developed today. 

Lost Technologies of Ancient Egypt

By Christopher Dunn,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Lost Technologies of Ancient Egypt as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

From the pyramids in the north to the temples in the south, ancient artisans left their marks all over Egypt, unique marks that reveal craftsmanship we would be hard pressed to duplicate today. Drawing together the results of more than 30 years of research and nine field study journeys to Egypt, Christopher Dunn presents a stunning stone-by-stone analysis of key Egyptian monuments, including the statue of Ramses II at Luxor and the fallen crowns that lay at its feet. His modern-day engineering expertise provides a unique view into the sophisticated technology used to create these famous monuments in prehistoric times.…


Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings

By Charles Hapgood,

Book cover of Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings: Evidence of Advanced Civilization in the Ice Age

Hapgood was a lecturer who used the bright young minds of some of his graduate students to make a detailed study of a pre-Columbian map drawn in 1513 by a Turkish Admiral by the name of Pirie Re’is. Rei’is had drawn his map using source maps made by Alexander the Great and even earlier peoples. It is of the Atlantic showing the Americas correctly drawn and placed. There is an ice-free Antarctica where the correct outline of the coast of Queen Maude land is less than 7 miles out of place. Hapgood’s similar analysis of other maps shows that there had been a global civilization on this planet sometime in the past.

Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings

By Charles Hapgood,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Some scholars have long claimed that a world civilization existed thousands of years ago - long before Egypt. They have even claimed that this lost civilization was almost as advanced as ours today.

In this book, Professor Charles H. Hapgood has produced the first concrete evidence of the existence of such a civilization. He has found the evidence in many beautiful maps long known to scholars, the so-called Portolano charts of the Middle Ages, and in other maps until now thought to have originated around the time of Columbus. Working with his students over a period of seven years, Hapgood…


Ancient Man

By William R. Corliss,

Book cover of Ancient Man: A Handbook of Puzzling Artifacts

Corless spent his life trawling through old magazines and scientific journals and recording articles about ancient artefacts that baffled the author at the time. He makes no comment on the articles, some of which reveal amazing discoveries. For example, the one about an iron cup that was found in a coal mine in Oklahoma. The coal had formed around it some 300m years ago and yet there it was—man-made but by whom. He outlines many other baffling discoveries as described in articles going back to the 19th century.

Ancient Man

By William R. Corliss,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Ancient Man as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Nearly four hundred articles and archaeological investigations probe the enigmatic artifacts of prehistoric man including pyramids, mounds and engineering structures as well as tools, flints, pictographs, drawings, skeletons, and fossils


Imprisoned with the Pharaohs

By H. P. Lovecraft,

Book cover of Imprisoned with the Pharaohs

While many turn to Lovecraft’s Cthulu writings as his best work, it was this short story of Houdini’s fictional encounter with an unspeakable beast beneath the Great Sphinx of Giza that had the most impact on me. Told from the perspective of Harry Houdini, the tale masterfully captures the mounting dread and claustrophobia of the famous escape artist as he unwittingly delves further underground, to say nothing of the fantastical horrors that await him. Forced to witness strange mummified creatures, under the direction of the malevolent Nitokris, give offerings to one of Lovecraft’s trademark many-tentacled monstrosities, Houdini may dismiss his encounter as a mere flight of fancy but the implication that some gruesome Old One was responsible for the creation of some of the world’s most awe-inspiring structures hits just a little differently.

Imprisoned with the Pharaohs

By H. P. Lovecraft,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Imprisoned with the Pharaohs as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

H. P. Lovecraft was one of the greatest horror writers of all time. His seminal work appeared in the pages of legendary Weird Tales and has influenced countless writer of the macabre. This is one of those stories.


Trim

By Matthew Flinders,

Book cover of Trim: The Story Of A Brave, Seafaring Cat

Trim was the ultimate ‘adventure cat’. Matthew Flinders was the ultimate navigator and cartographer. Together they circumnavigated the globe 1799-1804 and shared many daring and dangerous sea voyages. If you love both history and cats, I can highly recommend this book which celebrates the bond between a remarkable man and his equally remarkable feline companion.

Trim

By Matthew Flinders,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Trim as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

the story of a brave, seafaring cat who, in the company of Matthew Flinders, circumnavigated the globe in the years 1799-1804. to the memory of trim, the best and most illustrious of his Race, the most affectionate of friends, faithful of servants, and best of creatures. He made a tour of the Globe, and a voyage to Australia, which he circumnavigated; and was ever the delight and pleasure of his fellow voyagers. Returning to Europe in 1803, he was shipwrecked in the Great Equinoxial Ocean; this danger escaped, he sought refuge and assistance at the Isle of France, where he…


Tracing Archaeology's Past

By Andrew L. Christenson (editor),

Book cover of Tracing Archaeology's Past: The Historiography of Archaeology

I was at the landmark conference in 1987 that legitimated critical analyses of archaeological work and the socio-cultural parameters in which it takes place. We were all surprised at the numbers, range of interests, range of professional standing of the participants, and enthusiasm––all reflected in the papers in this book.  Dipping into it startles with the diversity of persons and places and times affecting the history of archaeology. Feminist concerns were loud and clear and critiqued from a supportive standpoint. Pair this with Trigger's magisterial history to see how he distilled a multitude of disparate activities oriented to the past, into his deeply discerning long story.  

Tracing Archaeology's Past

By Andrew L. Christenson (editor),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Tracing Archaeology's Past as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?



In 17 critical essays, the first book to address the historiography of archaeology evaluates how and why the history of archaeology is written.

The emphasis in the first section is on how archaeologists use historical knowledge of their discipline. For example, it can help them to understand the origin of current archaeological ideas, to learn from past errors, and to apply past research to current questions. It can even be integrated into the new liberal arts curricula in an attempt to instruct students in critical thinking.

The second section considers the sociopolitical context within which past archaeologists lived and worked…


Facts on the Ground

By Nadia Abu El-Haj,

Book cover of Facts on the Ground: Archaeological Practice and Territorial Self-Fashioning in Israeli Society

The Israeli narrative is particularly strong among Christain and Jewish communities due to a tale full of fabrications that stretches back to ancient times. This methodical and erudite research exposes the role of archeology in providing "scientific" scaffolding for that tale. 


Facts on the Ground

By Nadia Abu El-Haj,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Facts on the Ground as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Archaeology in Israel is truly a national obsession, a practice through which national identity-and national rights-have long been asserted. But how and why did archaeology emerge as such a pervasive force there? How can the practices of archaeology help answer those questions? In this stirring book, Nadia Abu El-Haj addresses these questions and specifies for the first time the relationship between national ideology, colonial settlement, and the production of historical knowledge. She analyzes particular instances of history, artifacts, and landscapes in the making to show how archaeology helped not only to legitimize cultural and political visions but, far more powerfully,…


The Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamen

By A.C. Mace, Howard Carter,

Book cover of The Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamen

Who has not heard of King Tut? Written by the discoverer of the tomb, the book is a fascinating glimpse into the mind of an accomplished archeologist and a window to the fabulous riches of Egypt. Reading firsthand about what they saw and how things were placed gives us an insight into how things may have been in the last few hours of sealing the tomb. I often use such content to fuel my imagination of what might have happened.

The Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamen

By A.C. Mace, Howard Carter,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamen as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

November 4, 1922. For six seasons the legendary Valley of the Kings has yielded no secrets to Howard Carter and his archeological team: "We had almost made up our minds that we were beaten," he writes, "and were preparing to leave The Valley and try our luck elsewhere; and then — hardly had we set hoe to ground in our last despairing effort than we made a discovery that far exceeded our wildest dreams."
Join Howard Carter in his fascinating odyssey toward the most dramatic archeological find of the century — the tomb of Tutankhamen. Written by Carter in 1923,…


Knossos & the Prophets of Modernism

By Cathy Gere,

Book cover of Knossos & the Prophets of Modernism

Palace of King Minos at Knossos on Crete seized the imaginations of scores of modernist writers, artists, psychoanalysts, and philosophers as wealthy English archaeologist Arthur Evans had its ruins disinterred and reconstructed with reinforced concrete, a novel building material in the early twentieth century. Evans' imaginative palace complex is today mobbed by tourists (I recommend going off-season in January, as I did) who revere the Aegean as the birthplace of Civilization. Gere ties it in to Modernist projects rejecting Victorian overstuffed ornamentations in favor of supposed ancient purity. Her fascinating documentation of culture leaders from Freud to Le Corbusier buying into Evans' myth of an idealized past embeds archaeology in arts and humanities fashions that still confuse speculation with history.

Knossos & the Prophets of Modernism

By Cathy Gere,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Knossos & the Prophets of Modernism as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In the spring of 1900, British archaeologist Arthur Evans began to excavate the palace of Knossos on Crete, bringing ancient Greek legends to life just as a new century dawned amid far-reaching questions about human history, art, and culture. With Knossos and the Prophets of Modernism, Cathy Gere relates the fascinating story of Evans' excavation and its long-term effects on Western culture. After World War I left the Enlightenment dream in tatters, the lost paradise that Evans offered in the concrete labyrinth - pacifist and matriarchal, pagan and cosmic - seemed to offer a new way forward for writers, artists,…


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