10 books like Adventures of a Bystander

By Peter F. Drucker,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like Adventures of a Bystander. Shepherd is a community of 7,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Excellence Wins

By Horst Schulze, Dean Merrill,

Book cover of Excellence Wins: A No-Nonsense Guide to Becoming the Best in a World of Compromise

Horst Schulze started as a bellboy and became the best hotelier in the world. He is the one who created the leading hotel chain Ritz Carlton. He won the Baldridge Quality Award twice. No one else has achieved that. But what's really interesting about this book is not the result, but the way he got there: how did he achieve this great goal? 

Anyone involved in service can learn extremely valuable lessons from this book. And in the process, you will also get to know Horst Schulze as a person. Because at the core of him lies the secret of success; he is a role model and leader.

Excellence Wins

By Horst Schulze, Dean Merrill,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Excellence Wins as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Horst Schulze knows what it takes to win. In Excellence Wins, the cofounder and former president of the Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company lays out a blueprint for becoming the very best in a world of compromise. In his characteristic no-nonsense approach, Schulze shares the visionary and disruptive principles that have led to immense global success over the course of his still-prolific fifty-year career in the hospitality industry.

For over twenty years, Schulze fearlessly led the company to unprecedented multibillion dollar growth, setting the business vision and people-focused standards that made the Ritz-Carlton brand world renowned. In Excellence Wins, Schulze shares his…


My Adventures in Marketing

By Philip Kotler,

Book cover of My Adventures in Marketing: The Autobiography of Philip Kotler

Modern business management without marketing is unthinkable. Marketing is Philip Kotler, and Philip Kotler is marketing. The two are inextricably linked. The descendant of Ukrainian immigrants has shaped the world of marketing like no one else. In this book, he tells not only his personal story, but also the story of marketing. So when you read it, you kill two birds with one stone. You get to know an extremely versatile contemporary and you learn all about a very important management discipline.

My Adventures in Marketing

By Philip Kotler,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked My Adventures in Marketing as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

PHILIP KOTLER is known around the world as the “father of modern marketing.” For over 50 years he has taught at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. Kotler’s book "Marketing Management" is the most widely used textbook in marketing around the world. This is his story – How a Ph.D. economist from M.I.T. became the world’s leading marketing authority.

The book covers: new ideas on marketing science and practice - views on the future of marketing and retailing - views on place marketing, person marketing, idea and cause marketing - encounters with museums, art collectors, and the…


Herman the German

By Gerhard Neumann,

Book cover of Herman the German: Just Lucky I Guess

In my life I have only met two real adventurers. One of them was Gerhard Neumann, a.k.a. Herman the German. Since his mother was Jewish, he left Nazi Germany and went to China. There he made his way as an engineer for the Flying Tigers and achieved technical miracles. He fled across Asia to escape Mao Tse Tung. Only a few years later, he became CEO of General Electric Aircraft Engines, the global market leader. Neumann developed both the best-selling military and commercial jet engines. But he always remained an adventurer. In the Death Valley, he flew supersonically below sea level. In Mexico, his plane crashed, but he survived. As a sailor, he got into distress at sea and survived. And he had a motto that I've adopted myself in business: Feel unsafe!

Herman the German

By Gerhard Neumann,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Herman the German as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Herman the German"This fascinating and amusing account of his life is told by a colorful and highly capable German who became one of America's most successful technical managers in the development of jet engines for aircraft."-David S. Lewis ChairmanGeneral Dynamics Corporation "Not only has Gerhard Neumann's life been filled with exotic and exciting adventures, but he was a highly successful engineer and executive-truly a superior individual and one of my favorite people."-Sanford N. McDonnellChairman, McDonnell Douglas Corporation "Readers of Gerhard's book will probably come to the same conclusion I formed while doing business with him; there is still room in…


Principles

By Ray Dalio,

Book cover of Principles: Life and Work

Ray Dalio is well known as the founder of the investment firm Bridgewater Associates and a successful investor. He has systematically worked his way up. This career pattern is not unusual for successful people and not the main reason why I recommend this book. What impressed me much more was the clarity with which he formulated his principles and, above all, the stringency with which he then implemented these principles. This requires an unusual discipline and perseverance that I, myself an entrepreneur, envy Ray Dalio for. Anyone who manages to apply this method will be successful.

Principles

By Ray Dalio,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Principles as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

#1 New York Times Bestseller

"Significant...The book is both instructive and surprisingly moving." -The New York Times

Ray Dalio, one of the world's most successful investors and entrepreneurs, shares the unconventional principles that he's developed, refined, and used over the past forty years to create unique results in both life and business-and which any person or organization can adopt to help achieve their goals.

In 1975, Ray Dalio founded an investment firm, Bridgewater Associates, out of his two-bedroom apartment in New York City. Forty years later, Bridgewater has made more money for its clients than any other hedge fund in…


Stomping the Blues

By Albert Murray,

Book cover of Stomping the Blues

I came across this book when I decided to focus my graduate study on the history of jazz and was reading everything I could find. It’s a short book, full of incredible vintage photographs, and it taught me so much about what swing is, how music and dance are joined at the hip. How it’s all rooted in the blues. And about the link between the “Saturday Night Function” of celebrating life with music and dance, followed a few hours later by the “Sunday Morning Function,” singing and celebrating God and community in church. The two are not all that far apart. Along with Ralph Ellison, Albert Murray was probably the first author to write about jazz with a real sense of lyricism and poetry. In this book, the writing itself carries the energy and exuberance of jazz.

Stomping the Blues

By Albert Murray,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Stomping the Blues as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In this classic work of American music writing, renowned critic Albert Murray argues beautifully and authoritatively that "the blues as such are synonymous with low spirits. Not only is its express purpose to make people feel good, which is to say in high spirits, but in the process of doing so it is actually expected to generate a disposition that is both elegantly playful and heroic in its nonchalance."

In Stomping the Blues Murray explores its history, influences, development, and meaning as only he can. More than two hundred vintage photographs capture the ambiance Murray evokes in lyrical prose. Only…


The Old Army

By Edward M. Coffman,

Book cover of The Old Army: A Portrait of the American Army in Peacetime, 1784-1898

Coffman’s twin volumes are a, if not the, foundational texts on the social history of the peacetime US Army. Drawing on a host of sources, the books brought to light, in many cases for the first time, the experiences of officers, enlisted men, and their families from the Regular Army’s founding to the outbreak of World War II. Without apparent effort, the late Mac Coffman combined the history of a military organization with the stories of hundreds of individuals who were its components, and he did it with empathy, warmth, humor, and masterly tale-telling.

The Old Army

By Edward M. Coffman,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Old Army as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

One of the most important works of military history published in the last decade, The Old Army is the only comprehensive study of the people who made up the "garrison world" in the peacetime intervals between the War for Independence and the Spanish-American War. Drawing on diaries, letters, and other primary documents, Edward M. Coffman vividly recreates the harsh, often lonely life of men, collected mostly from the streets of Northern cities, for whom
enlistment was "a leap in the dark...a choice of evils." He pays special attention to the roles of women and children, as well as black Americans,…


Progress

By Johan Norberg,

Book cover of Progress: Ten Reasons to Look Forward to the Future

Talking about the future always depresses my students. They think life has become steadily worse over the past century and they see no evidence of a course correction. Norberg presents evidence to show that this is wrong. In terms of poverty, life expectancy, violence, literacy, and freedom, life has become better. He also explores why we think the opposite. Now this all may be the calm before the storm, but to fashion a better world we must know it for what it is today. 

Progress

By Johan Norberg,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Progress as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A Book of the Year for The Economist and the Observer

Our world seems to be collapsing. The daily news cycle reports the deterioration: divisive politics across the Western world, racism, poverty, war, inequality, hunger. While politicians, journalists and activists from all sides talk about the damage done, Johan Norberg offers an illuminating and heartening analysis of just how far we have come in tackling the greatest problems facing humanity. In the face of fear-mongering, darkness and division, the facts are unequivocal: the golden age is now.


Kingdoms and Communities in Western Europe 900-1300

By Susan Reynolds,

Book cover of Kingdoms and Communities in Western Europe 900-1300

Susan Reynolds was renowned for speaking her mind, never rudely but always forthrightly. If she considered that a generally accepted view or term was wrong or misleading or ill-defined, she said so. In a later work of hers, Fiefs and Vassals, she questioned the very value of the term “feudalism” when analyzing the Middle Ages. In Kingdoms and Communities, a rather less polemical work, she argued for the importance of self-organizing lay communities (parishes, guilds, even “the community of the realm”) as contrasted with the traditional focus on kings and the Church. Susan was in the line of a long tradition of female medievalists at Oxford and Cambridge, going back even before female students were allowed to take degrees. Eileen Power (1889-1940), author of Medieval People (1924, still in print) would be a precursor.

Kingdoms and Communities in Western Europe 900-1300

By Susan Reynolds,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Kingdoms and Communities in Western Europe 900-1300 as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This study is an exploration of the collective values and activities of lay society in Western Europe between the tenth century and the thirteenth. Arguing that medieval attitudes and behaviour have too readily been defined in terms of hierarchical structures of government, clerical thought, or narrow notion of kinship, the author instead places new emphasis on the horizontal bonds of collective association which permeated society in medieval England, France and
Burgundy, Germany, the Netherlands, and Italy.
By refocusing on the social and political values that characterized lay collective activity, this book offers a stimulating new approach to the history of…


Inventing the American Astronaut

By Matthew H. Hersch,

Book cover of Inventing the American Astronaut

Hersch applies the sober, decidedly unsentimental, and almost brutally incisive analytical framework of labor conflict and professionalization to a whole range of issues negotiated within NASA—from the criteria for astronaut selection to the degree of spacecraft automation to mission programming. Each of these issues emerges loaded with interests of various professional groups—test pilots, military pilots, scientists, engineers, and managers. The astronaut profession is born through a series of clashes of professional cultures, each competing for influence within the US space program.

In my view, comparing this story with the parallel developments on the Soviet side reveals drastic differences. While the pilots-cosmonauts found themselves almost completely at the mercy of powerful space engineers, the astronauts skillfully used their symbolic capital to gain influence on decision-making at NASA.

Inventing the American Astronaut

By Matthew H. Hersch,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Inventing the American Astronaut as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Who were the men who led America's first expeditions into space? Soldiers? Daredevils? The public sometimes imagined them that way: heroic military men and hot-shot pilots without the capacity for doubt, fear, or worry. However, early astronauts were hard-working and determined professionals - 'organization men' - who were calm, calculating, and highly attuned to the politics and celebrity of the Space Race. Many would have been at home in corporate America - and until the first rockets carried humans into space, some seemed to be headed there. Instead, they strapped themselves to missiles and blasted skyward, returning with a smile…


The Third Wave

By Alvin Toffler,

Book cover of The Third Wave: The Classic Study of Tomorrow

I like to look at the big picture. This book’s picture is huge: it explains three waves of human civilization, from agriculture and land ownership, to centralization and mass manufacturing, to distributed and custom everything—the wave we are in now. It was originally published in 1980 and predicted our current culture and technology with astonishing accuracy. I, and many entrepreneurs of the time, tried to use those predictions to guide our businesses, and many, like Amazon, succeeded as a result. Are there still more third wave things to invent? Yes—think of how streaming video channels are just now taking over from cable and broadcast, not to mention movie theatres. Will this help you invent the next big thing? Maybe. And what will the fourth wave be?

The Third Wave

By Alvin Toffler,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Third Wave as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

From the author of Future Shock, a striking way out of today’s despair . . . a bracing, optimistic look at our new potentials.

The Third Wave makes startling sense of the violent changes now battering our world. Its sweeping synthesis casts fresh light on our new forms of marriage and family, on today's dramatic changes in business and economics. It explains the role of cults, the new definitions of work, play, love, and success. It points toward new forms of twenty-first-century democracy.

Praise for The Third Wave
 
“Magnificent . . . an astonishing array of information.”—The Washington Post
 
“Imperishably…


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