The best books about Prince Edward Island

1 authors have picked their favorite books about Prince Edward Island and why they recommend each book.

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If You’re Stronghearted

By Edward MacDonald,

Book cover of If You’re Stronghearted: Prince Edward Island in the Twentieth Century

If all you know about Prince Edward Island is that it’s a pretty tourist destination, you will be surprised by this book. The author tells the story of PEI in the 20th century with great flair. Along the way, readers learn about the people, events, and influential forces that shaped Island life over that era. We find out not just about seed potatoes, fox farming, ferry boats, and fixed links, but also about the troubles brought by economic depression, outmigration, and regional disparity. Two world wars also figure into the story. In a nutshell, If You're Stronghearted describes both changes and continuity within the distinctive Canadian province. The book features a wonderful selection of images.  

If You’re Stronghearted

By Edward MacDonald,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked If You’re Stronghearted as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Book by MacDonald, Edward


Who am I?

This marks the second time Jesse Francis and I have collaborated to explore an aspect of Prince Edward Island history. Our first book—Ni’n na L’nu: The Mi’kmaq of Prince Edward Island (2013)—won three prizes. We hope this new work, which presents aspects of the history of the Mi’kmaq along with those of French, Acadian, and British colonists, will be welcomed. We think it important to bring together—rather than separate—the many strands of our shared past.


I wrote...

Ancient Land, New Land: Skamaqn - Port-La-Joye - Fort Amherst

By A.J.B. Johnston, Jesse Francis,

Book cover of Ancient Land, New Land: Skamaqn - Port-La-Joye - Fort Amherst

What is my book about?

Our book about this single, triple-named historic site across the harbor from Charlottetown, PEI, presents multiple stories. As Skmaqn, the location was long known to the Mi’kmaq, Prince Edward Island’s Indigenous people. As Port-la-Joye, it became the first permanent European settlement on Île Saint-Jean (PEI) in 1720. French and Mi’kmaq leaders met there to renew their friendship and military alliance. Then, in 1758, the British proceeded to erect Fort Amherst and begin a mass removal of the French and Acadian population.

Nearly half of the Acadians shipped to France perished due to onboard illnesses and shipwrecks. Finally, this area was the headquarters for the Island-changing survey led by British engineer, Samuel Holland. Richly illustrated, including art specially created for this publication, Ancient Land, New Land presents PEI’s early history in a fresh new way.

This book is available here.

Samuel Holland

By Earle Lockerby, Douglas Sobey,

Book cover of Samuel Holland: His Work and Legacy on Prince Edward Island

The two authors combine their historical and geographical talents in this book. It offers a wealth of information on a wide range of themes relating to the famous Holland survey of the nascent British colony of St. John’s Island (later renamed Prince Edward Island). That survey, carried out on orders from the British Crown in 1764-65, generated the first fully accurate map of Prince Edward Island, dividing it into counties, townships, royalties, and individual lots that are still in place today. While the Holland survey was an exceptional technical achievement, it—and the subsequent lottery that allocated many of the lots to absentee owners—led to many long-term complications on PEI. The well-illustrated study explains much about how and why the Island’s subsequent history followed the course it did.

Samuel Holland

By Earle Lockerby, Douglas Sobey,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Samuel Holland as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Who am I?

This marks the second time Jesse Francis and I have collaborated to explore an aspect of Prince Edward Island history. Our first book—Ni’n na L’nu: The Mi’kmaq of Prince Edward Island (2013)—won three prizes. We hope this new work, which presents aspects of the history of the Mi’kmaq along with those of French, Acadian, and British colonists, will be welcomed. We think it important to bring together—rather than separate—the many strands of our shared past.


I wrote...

Ancient Land, New Land: Skamaqn - Port-La-Joye - Fort Amherst

By A.J.B. Johnston, Jesse Francis,

Book cover of Ancient Land, New Land: Skamaqn - Port-La-Joye - Fort Amherst

What is my book about?

Our book about this single, triple-named historic site across the harbor from Charlottetown, PEI, presents multiple stories. As Skmaqn, the location was long known to the Mi’kmaq, Prince Edward Island’s Indigenous people. As Port-la-Joye, it became the first permanent European settlement on Île Saint-Jean (PEI) in 1720. French and Mi’kmaq leaders met there to renew their friendship and military alliance. Then, in 1758, the British proceeded to erect Fort Amherst and begin a mass removal of the French and Acadian population.

Nearly half of the Acadians shipped to France perished due to onboard illnesses and shipwrecks. Finally, this area was the headquarters for the Island-changing survey led by British engineer, Samuel Holland. Richly illustrated, including art specially created for this publication, Ancient Land, New Land presents PEI’s early history in a fresh new way.

This book is available here.

Book cover of Illustrated History of the Acadians of Prince Edward Island

In both English and French, Georges Arsenault has written many books on different aspects of the Acadian history of PEI. This 2019 book is the author’s most recent (French title: Histoire illustrée de l’Acadie de l’Ile-du-Prince-Édouard). It’s aimed at general interest readers and provides an overview of the three centuries of French and Acadian presence on the Island since 1720. Topics addressed include the early settlement period, the mass deportation in 1758, and the subsequent resettlement by Acadians. The author also looks at the role of the Catholic Church, French-language education, the economic changes across time, and the struggles to ensure a vibrant French-speaking Acadian culture on the Island.

Illustrated History of the Acadians of Prince Edward Island

By Georges Arsenault,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Illustrated History of the Acadians of Prince Edward Island as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Written for the general reader, this book by Georges Arsenault provides an overview of the three hundred years of French and Acadian presence on Prince Edward Island. The author describes the first settlements established on the Island by France, the deportation of the Acadian inhabitants in 1758, and their resettlement on the Island. He also looks at the evolution of the economy, the role of the Catholic Church, French-language education, and the struggles to ensure a vibrant French culture in the Acadian communities throughout the Island.


Who am I?

This marks the second time Jesse Francis and I have collaborated to explore an aspect of Prince Edward Island history. Our first book—Ni’n na L’nu: The Mi’kmaq of Prince Edward Island (2013)—won three prizes. We hope this new work, which presents aspects of the history of the Mi’kmaq along with those of French, Acadian, and British colonists, will be welcomed. We think it important to bring together—rather than separate—the many strands of our shared past.


I wrote...

Ancient Land, New Land: Skamaqn - Port-La-Joye - Fort Amherst

By A.J.B. Johnston, Jesse Francis,

Book cover of Ancient Land, New Land: Skamaqn - Port-La-Joye - Fort Amherst

What is my book about?

Our book about this single, triple-named historic site across the harbor from Charlottetown, PEI, presents multiple stories. As Skmaqn, the location was long known to the Mi’kmaq, Prince Edward Island’s Indigenous people. As Port-la-Joye, it became the first permanent European settlement on Île Saint-Jean (PEI) in 1720. French and Mi’kmaq leaders met there to renew their friendship and military alliance. Then, in 1758, the British proceeded to erect Fort Amherst and begin a mass removal of the French and Acadian population.

Nearly half of the Acadians shipped to France perished due to onboard illnesses and shipwrecks. Finally, this area was the headquarters for the Island-changing survey led by British engineer, Samuel Holland. Richly illustrated, including art specially created for this publication, Ancient Land, New Land presents PEI’s early history in a fresh new way.

This book is available here.

Three Centuries and the Island

By Andrew Hill Clark,

Book cover of Three Centuries and the Island: A Historical Geography of Settlement and Agriculture in Prince Edward Island, Canada

Though published more than 60 years ago—and therefore a little dated—this study remains highly useful. Clark opens with the Island’s natural geography and then looks at how its resources were used by the Mi’kmaq and subsequent settlers of Acadian, Scottish, Irish, Loyalist, and English backgrounds. The book’s 155 maps and 16 tables illustrate the distribution of the population by area and origin over time and the evolution in crops and livestock from the early 18th to the mid-20th centuries. Readers wanting more recent historical and geographical essays should check out Time and a Place, An Environmental History of Prince Edward Island (2016), with articles by a dozen scholars. As for PEI’s geology, check out John Calder, Island at the Centre of the World.

Three Centuries and the Island

By Andrew Hill Clark,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Three Centuries and the Island as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This study is one of the first in the field of historical geography to be published in Canada. Written after exhaustive research, it uses a particular approach to the study of historical agricultural geography which concentrates on the use of basic distributional evidence for the description and interpretation of the changing character of any region through any period of time. By the analysis of over 1200 maps, some of which form part of the text of the book, Professor Clark studies agriculture as the dominant economic activity of Prince Edward Island and traces with remarkable clarity through the changing patterns…


Who am I?

This marks the second time Jesse Francis and I have collaborated to explore an aspect of Prince Edward Island history. Our first book—Ni’n na L’nu: The Mi’kmaq of Prince Edward Island (2013)—won three prizes. We hope this new work, which presents aspects of the history of the Mi’kmaq along with those of French, Acadian, and British colonists, will be welcomed. We think it important to bring together—rather than separate—the many strands of our shared past.


I wrote...

Ancient Land, New Land: Skamaqn - Port-La-Joye - Fort Amherst

By A.J.B. Johnston, Jesse Francis,

Book cover of Ancient Land, New Land: Skamaqn - Port-La-Joye - Fort Amherst

What is my book about?

Our book about this single, triple-named historic site across the harbor from Charlottetown, PEI, presents multiple stories. As Skmaqn, the location was long known to the Mi’kmaq, Prince Edward Island’s Indigenous people. As Port-la-Joye, it became the first permanent European settlement on Île Saint-Jean (PEI) in 1720. French and Mi’kmaq leaders met there to renew their friendship and military alliance. Then, in 1758, the British proceeded to erect Fort Amherst and begin a mass removal of the French and Acadian population.

Nearly half of the Acadians shipped to France perished due to onboard illnesses and shipwrecks. Finally, this area was the headquarters for the Island-changing survey led by British engineer, Samuel Holland. Richly illustrated, including art specially created for this publication, Ancient Land, New Land presents PEI’s early history in a fresh new way.

This book is available here.

Those Splendid Girls

By Kathleen Dewar,

Book cover of Those Splendid Girls: The Heroic Service of Prince Edward Island Nurses in the Great War

More than 115 PEI women served as nurses in the First World War, and this book provides rich details about their individual and collective experiences. The author carried out meticulous research to gather the nurses’ stories from a wide range of sources and she writes about that service with admiration. Helping to convey the nurses’ varied experiences are a large number of photos and several maps which locate the overseas hospitals and other facilities where they served. Despite all they accomplished, the PEI nurses—like nurses from other parts of North America—were largely greeted by a “great silence” when they returned from overseas. Those Splendid Girls makes an important contribution to the history of women and nursing during the First World War. 

Those Splendid Girls

By Kathleen Dewar,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Those Splendid Girls as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Over 115 women from Prince Edward Island women served as nurses in the First World War. They were fullblooded, complex women living in a tumultuous time in our history, doing their duty on distant battlefields. Their courage, and the courage of all Canadian nurses, is saluted in a powerful new book about wartime nursing called Those Splendid Girls. It features many wartime nursing photos from private albums, a 35-page biography section, an index, and bibliography.


Who am I?

This marks the second time Jesse Francis and I have collaborated to explore an aspect of Prince Edward Island history. Our first book—Ni’n na L’nu: The Mi’kmaq of Prince Edward Island (2013)—won three prizes. We hope this new work, which presents aspects of the history of the Mi’kmaq along with those of French, Acadian, and British colonists, will be welcomed. We think it important to bring together—rather than separate—the many strands of our shared past.


I wrote...

Ancient Land, New Land: Skamaqn - Port-La-Joye - Fort Amherst

By A.J.B. Johnston, Jesse Francis,

Book cover of Ancient Land, New Land: Skamaqn - Port-La-Joye - Fort Amherst

What is my book about?

Our book about this single, triple-named historic site across the harbor from Charlottetown, PEI, presents multiple stories. As Skmaqn, the location was long known to the Mi’kmaq, Prince Edward Island’s Indigenous people. As Port-la-Joye, it became the first permanent European settlement on Île Saint-Jean (PEI) in 1720. French and Mi’kmaq leaders met there to renew their friendship and military alliance. Then, in 1758, the British proceeded to erect Fort Amherst and begin a mass removal of the French and Acadian population.

Nearly half of the Acadians shipped to France perished due to onboard illnesses and shipwrecks. Finally, this area was the headquarters for the Island-changing survey led by British engineer, Samuel Holland. Richly illustrated, including art specially created for this publication, Ancient Land, New Land presents PEI’s early history in a fresh new way.

This book is available here.

Book cover of Deportation of the Prince Edward Island Acadians

As the title proclaims, this is a book about one particular Acadian Deportation, that from Prince Edward Island. It occurred three years after the first wave in 1755, and it had France not the Anglo-American colonies as the destination. It was largest of all the different forcible Acadian removals, and nearly half of those sent to France perished due to shipboard illnesses and shipwrecks. Lockerby undertook meticulous research and summarizes it in this book. Before this publication came out—and there is a French-language version as well—this chapter in the saga of the Acadian people had been little and poorly understood. The headquarters for this mass deportation was the Canadian national historic site of Skmaqn—Port-la-Joye—Fort Amherst, which happens to be the focus of my next book, Ancient Land, New Land.

Deportation of the Prince Edward Island Acadians

By Earle Lockerby,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Deportation of the Prince Edward Island Acadians as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

When the fortress of Louisbourg fell to the British in 1758, the Acadians of Prince Edward Island (then known as Île Saint-Jean) were doomed to a horrible fate—deportation from their homes to an unknown land thousands of kilometres away. Shipwrecks and disease took a terrible toll during the voyage to France, and hundreds of the approximately three thousand deportees lost their lives.

Earle Lockerby's meticulously researched account sheds new light on this tragic event, from its implementation to the experiences of the Acadians who eluded British troops and escaped to the mainland, to the deportees' arrival in Europe. Featuring excerpts…


Who am I?

I have no French or Acadian ancestors—as far as I know—yet the majority of my 21 books (history and fiction) explore different aspects of French colonial or Acadian history. Childhood visits to historic sites like the Port-Royal Habitation, Grand-Pré, Louisbourg and Fort Anne must have planted the seeds for the historian and writer I would become. Then again, working for years as an historian at the Fortress of Louisbourg definitely helped. France made me a chevalier of its Ordre des Palmes académiques for my body of work.


I wrote...

The Hat

By A.J.B. Johnston,

Book cover of The Hat

What is my book about?

The Hat presents the story of the 1755 Acadian Deportation from Grand-Pré, Nova Scotia, in a fresh, 21st-century way. Readers are not told—until the Afterword— where and when the action is taking place, nor by whom or to whom. Everything that happens is seen through the eyes of two central characters, 14-year-old Marie and 10-year-old Charles. The sister and brother show determination and perseverance as they deal with an incredibly difficult situation. Though based on a tragedy, the story is uplifting and inspiring. In the Afterword, readers discover the historical details behind the story they have just read.

The Red Door Inn

By Liz Johnson,

Book cover of The Red Door Inn

We all know Prince Edward Island from the Anne of Green Gables series, but nothing has made me want to step on the shores more than Liz Johnson’s contemporary romance, The Red Door Inn. When Marie flees a troubled past, she lands in PEI and finds herself helping renovate a historic bed and breakfast. Set right on the water, this story enchants the heart and scratches the travel itch in equal parts. With crackling romantic tension, sweeping views, and brisk sea air, this book has everything you need to drift away for a little vacation right from your couch.

The Red Door Inn

By Liz Johnson,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Red Door Inn as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Marie Carrington is running from a host of bad memories. Broke and desperate, she's hoping to find safety and sanctuary on Prince Edward Island, where she reluctantly agrees to help decorate a renovated bed-and-breakfast before it opens for prime tourist season.

Seth Sloane didn't move three thousand miles to work on his uncle's B&B so he could babysit a woman with a taste for expensive antiques and a bewildering habit of jumping every time he brushes past her. He came to help restore the old Victorian--and to forget about the fiancee who broke his heart.
The only thing Marie and…


Who am I?

After living in Europe for nearly 10 years, I’ve spent more time in planes, trains, and cars than I could ever count. I was able to travel more in that time than I ever dreamed possible, making trips ranging from Gibraltar to Romania to the Isle of Skye. Most of my time was spent all around Ireland where I took tour groups around to help them get beyond Blarney and experience the real Ireland.


I wrote...

The Lady of Galway Manor

By Jennifer Deibel,

Book cover of The Lady of Galway Manor

What is my book about?

In 1920, Annabeth De Lacy's father is appointed landlord of Galway Parish in Ireland. Annabeth convinces her father to arrange an apprenticeship for her with the Jennings family--descendants of the creator of the famed Claddagh Ring. Stephen Jennings longs to do anything other than run his family's jewelry shop. Having had his heart broken, he no longer believes in love and is weary of peddling the "lies" the Claddagh Ring promises.

Meanwhile, as the war for Irish independence gains strength, many locals resent the De Lacys and decide to take things into their own hands to display their displeasure. As events take a dangerous turn for Annabeth and her family, she and Stephen begin to see that perhaps the "other side" isn't quite as barbaric and uncultured as they'd been led to believe.

The List of Last Chances

By Christina Myers,

Book cover of The List of Last Chances

A road trip provides a reliable narrative structure. But what makes each journey distinct is what the travellers see, do and learn along the way. This charming, funny book follows Ruthie, a recently single, down-on-her-luck 38-year-old as she accompanies Kay (70s) across Canada from Prince Edward Island to Vancouver, where Kay’s son wishes her to relocate. Kay doesn’t want to move, but if she is going to Vancouver, she has a list of ‘last chances’ for her and Ruthie to experience along the way. And thus an improbable friendship begins. Told from Ruthie’s perspective, this book reminded me of how much there is to discover on a road trip—the places we see, the people we meet along the way, and the person the journey inspires us to become. 

The List of Last Chances

By Christina Myers,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The List of Last Chances as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

At thirty-eight years old, Ruthie finds herself newly unemployed, freshly single, sleeping on a friend’s couch and downing a bottle of wine each night. Having overstayed her welcome and desperate for a job, Ruthie responds to David’s ad: he’s looking for someone to drive his aging mother, Kay, and her belongings from PEI to Vancouver. Ruthie thinks it’s the perfect chance for a brief escape and a much-needed boost for her empty bank account. But once they’re on the road, Kay reveals that she’s got a list of stops along the way that’s equal parts sightseeing tour, sexual bucket-list, and…


Who am I?

I’m a Canadian author who has been fascinated with how others see the world since I was a child. I was captivated by Charlotte’s Web. If pigs and spiders could be having unheard conversations, what else was I missing? I delight in stories that invite me into the distinct world of the narrator, so it’s no surprise that my novel, Entitled, is written from a unique perspective—that of a book. When done well, these stories let us see life through the eyes of someone else. If we all experienced our surroundings, just for a minute, as others did, perhaps there would be more humanity in this world. 


I wrote...

Entitled: Life isn't easy when you're a book

By Cookie Boyle,

Book cover of Entitled: Life isn't easy when you're a book

What is my book about?

The extraordinary adventures of an extraordinary book.

Entitled is a charming, humorous novel told from the perspective of a book seeking to find a home. As it is read, misplaced, loaned, and abandoned, our book, like its Readers, discovers love and heartbreak, loneliness and friendship, and ultimately becomes the author of its own journey. In the end, Entitled reveals the pull between the story we are born with and the one we wish to create for ourselves.

Emily of New Moon

By Lucy Maud Montgomery,

Book cover of Emily of New Moon

I was raised Protestant in Québec, a province with a post-Catholic culture. There were few novels I could relate to growing up there. I was in my early teens when my sister-in-law lent me Emily of New Moon from her personal collection. Possibly because it’s about a nascent author, but also because it describes a Presbyterian lifestyle that felt familiar to us both. Emily Starr is a passionate girl who’s sent to live with her aunts and cousin on a farm on Prince Edward Island following her father’s death. Writing to her father “On the Road to Heaven,” she offers hilarious criticism of her culture’s religious legalism and takes her first steps as a poetess. Considered Montgomery’s most autobiographical work, it is a story full of laughter, excitement, and beauty. 

Emily of New Moon

By Lucy Maud Montgomery,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Emily of New Moon as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Following her father's death, the newly orphaned Emily Starr is quickly uprooted and sent to live with her aunts and cousins on Prince Edward Island. After an initial culture shock, Emily reevaluates the situation and attempts to make the most of her new surroundings.

When Emily Starr's father dies from tuberculosis, she moves to New Moon Farm to stay with relatives. It's a jarring change of pace and scenery that pits Emily against her strict aunt Elizabeth and new classmates. Despite the circumstance, she forges friendships with local children: Teddy Kent, Ilse Burnley and Perry Miller. They each have distinct…


Who am I?

I was born in Montréal, Québec, Canada. French is my first language, but I learned to master English in my teens. My mother taught me to read early and I became a bookworm in primary school. I began writing personal stories at ten and decided to study literature in the hope of perfecting my craft. Unfortunately, so many of the program’s books felt dull and irrelevant to me. But once in a while, an inspiring work of universal quality would come up, and I began building my collection. The books I recommend here are dear to my heart and motivated me to keep reading and writing. 


I wrote...

On Duty

By Ketsia Lessard,

Book cover of On Duty

What is my book about?

When a deathbed confession leads RCMP Constable Jasper Nelson to discover the existence of his illegitimate sister, his curiosity is piqued and he sets out to find her. He locates the young woman a year later where he least expects to, within the police force itself. 

As the geographical distance separating them becomes unbearable, Nelson obtains a transfer from Vancouver to the Inuvik detachment where he partners with his hardy sibling Heidi Finlay to investigate criminal activity and trauma in the High Arctic. Inspired by actual events, On Duty is a series of cases narrated by the Mounties themselves; through Nelson’s refined prose and Finlay’s no-nonsense reporting, a portrait of human nature emerges, emphasizing the possibility—and need—for divine redemption.

Anne of Green Gables

By Mariah Marsden, Brenna Thummler (illustrator),

Book cover of Anne of Green Gables: A Graphic Novel

I’m always a fan of graphic novels that capture the mood of the book, rather than trying to make everything perfectly accurate to the original. Mariah Marsden’s adaptation of Anne of Green Gables perfectly captures the magic and beauty of one of my favorite childhood books.

I mentioned how much I enjoyed this adaptation to a friend who’s also a fan of L.M. Montgomery. However, my friend hated this adaptation (especially how Anne’s nose is drawn!) which I actually found very liberating as I considered adapting The Great Gatsby. I’d been concerned about how people who loved Gatsby would view my adaptation, but this made me realize that some people would love my book and some people wouldn’t—and that was okay!

Anne of Green Gables

By Mariah Marsden, Brenna Thummler (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Anne of Green Gables as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The spirit of Anne is alive and well in Mariah Marsden's crisp adaptation, and it's a thrill to watch as the beloved orphan rushes headlong through Brenna Thummler's heavenly landscapes. Together Marsden and Thummler conjure all the magic and beauty of Green Gables. Like Anne herself, you won't want to leave.
- Brian Selznick, author/illustrator of "The Invention of Hugo Cabret" and "The Marvels"

The magic of L.M. Montgomery's treasured classic is reimagined in a whimsically-illustrated graphic novel adaptation perfect for newcomers and kindred spirits alike.

When Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert decide to adopt an orphan who can help manage…


Who am I?

I’m a graphic novelist and designer based in beautiful Minneapolis. I tend to be varied in my artistic style and medium, moving between comics, illustration, design, and occasionally animation. Having created a graphic novel adaptation of The Great Gatsby, I feel very passionate about the subject of graphic novel adaptations. One of the most important things is that there should be a compelling reason for it to be a graphic novel in the first place; the graphic novel should do something that a prose book cannot. For my adaptation, that was the visual depiction of metaphors, the ethereal character designs, and the lush jewel-colored watercolor. The books I recommended add to the original story in unique and compelling ways. 


I wrote...

The Great Gatsby: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

By F. Scott Fitzgerald, K. Woodman-Maynard (illustrator),

Book cover of The Great Gatsby: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

What is my book about?

My book is a graphic novel adaptation of The Great Gatsby, the classic Jazz Age story by F. Scott Fitzgerald. My version is a faithful, yet modern adaptation meant to appeal to fans of classic as well as those new to the story. I painted it in lush watercolors and tried to emphasize the extravagance, beauty, and mystery of Fitzgerald's world.  

I had particular fun with Fitzgerald’s descriptive language and beautiful metaphors which I took to their literal extremes. For instance, when Fitzgerald described a party guest as resembling an orchid, I drew her as a blossoming orchid. Party guests flit around on wings with trays of champagne floating through the air.

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