The best Nazism books

20 authors have picked their favorite books about Nazism and why they recommend each book.

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The Nazi Conscience

By Claudia Koonz,

Book cover of The Nazi Conscience

One of the most difficult facets of Nazism for my college students to grasp is that the Nazis had a sense of ethics and morals. It’s easy to look at the horrors of Nazism, rightfully condemn the Nazis as monstrous, and congratulate ourselves on having the moral and ethical fiber that would never allow us to engage in such atrocities. The thing is, though, that so much of the evil committed in this world is committed by people who think they are doing what’s right. Koonz’s examination of Nazi morals is an uncomfortable read but a necessary one. It forced me and it forces my students to confront the unpleasant truth that evil also has a sense of “moral” and “immoral.”

The Nazi Conscience

By Claudia Koonz,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked The Nazi Conscience as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The Nazi conscience is not an oxymoron. In fact, the perpetrators of genocide had a powerful sense of right and wrong, based on civic values that exalted the moral righteousness of the ethnic community and denounced outsiders.

Claudia Koonz's latest work reveals how racial popularizers developed the infrastructure and rationale for genocide during the so-called normal years before World War II. Her careful reading of the voluminous Nazi writings on race traces the transformation of longtime Nazis' vulgar anti-Semitism into a racial ideology that seemed credible to the vast majority of ordinary Germans who never joined the Nazi Party. Challenging…


Who am I?

I’m a German History professor who focuses on the Holocaust, but I’ve been educating myself on the topic since 5th grade, when a friend suggested some children’s literature on the Holocaust. So, I guess this is a topic that has interested me for some thirty years now. I can’t stop asking why, I can’t stop reading, and I can’t stop educating, especially as Holocaust denial and antisemitism are on the rise. History, in general, can teach us so much about who we are and who we have the potential to become. The Holocaust is a prime example of what happens when humanity fails to achieve its potential.  


I wrote...

Submerged on the Surface: The Not-So-Hidden Jews of Nazi Berlin, 1941–1945

By Richard N. Lutjens Jr.,

Book cover of Submerged on the Surface: The Not-So-Hidden Jews of Nazi Berlin, 1941–1945

What is my book about?

Between 1941 and 1945, thousands of German Jews, in fear for their lives, made the choice to flee their impending deportations and live submerged in the shadows of the Nazi capital. Drawing on a wealth of archival evidence and interviews with survivors, this book reconstructs the daily lives of Jews who stayed in Berlin during the war years. Contrary to the received wisdom that “hidden” Jews stayed in attics and cellars and had minimal contact with the outside world, the author reveals a cohort of remarkable individuals who were constantly on the move and actively fought to ensure their own survival.

Heidegger

By Emmanuel Faye, Michael B. Smith (translator),

Book cover of Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy in Light of the Unpublished Seminars of 1933-1935

Faye’s book has been extremely controversial, exposing him to sometimes quite nasty attacks by Heidegger apologists. But with respect to the core of what his book is about—the pro-Hitlerite seminars given by Heidegger during the years when he was most closely aligned with the Nazis—it’s an absolutely devastating account. The book is a must-read. Should be read in conjunction with Charles Bambach’s 2003 book, Heidegger’s Roots.

Heidegger

By Emmanuel Faye, Michael B. Smith (translator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Heidegger as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In the most comprehensive examination to date of Heidegger's Nazism, Emmanuel Faye draws on previously unavailable materials to paint a damning picture of Nazism's influence on the philosopher's thought and politics. In this provocative book, Faye uses excerpts from unpublished seminars to show that Heidegger's philosophical writings are fatally compromised by an adherence to National Socialist ideas. In other documents, Faye finds expressions of racism and exterminatory anti-Semitism. Faye disputes the view of Heidegger as a naive, temporarily disoriented academician and instead shows him to have been a self-appointed 'spiritual guide' for Nazism whose intentionality was clear. Contrary to what…


Who am I?

I’m a political theorist recently retired from the University of Toronto. Around fall 2014, I became aware that a hyper-energetic, well-educated intelligentsia was trying to move heaven and earth to make fascism intellectually respectable again. I resolved to educate myself about these scary characters. I was truly alarmed, and wrote my book to convey my alarm to fellow citizens who hadn’t yet woken up to the threat. Sure enough, within a couple of years, Richard Spencer rose to media stardom; and one of the first things that Trump did after being elected in November of 2016 was to decide that a crypto-fascist Steve Bannon was worthy of a senior position in the White House. 


I wrote...

Dangerous Minds: Nietzsche, Heidegger, and the Return of the Far Right

By Ronald Beiner,

Book cover of Dangerous Minds: Nietzsche, Heidegger, and the Return of the Far Right

What is my book about?

In Dangerous Minds, I trace the deepest philosophical roots of such right-wing ideologues as Richard Spencer, Aleksandr Dugin, and Steve Bannon to the writings of Nietzsche and Heidegger—and specifically to the aspects of their thought that express revulsion for the liberal-democratic view of life. Beiner contends that Nietzsche's hatred and critique of bourgeois, egalitarian societies has engendered new disciples on the populist right who threaten to overturn the modern liberal consensus. Heidegger thoroughly rejected the moral and political values that arose during the Enlightenment and came to power in the wake of the French Revolution. Understanding Heideggerian dissatisfaction with modernity, and how it functions as a philosophical magnet for those most profoundly alienated from the reigning liberal-democratic order, should give us insight into the return of the far right.

Staging the Third Reich

By Anson Rabinbach, Stefanos Geroulanos (editor), Dagmar Herzog (editor)

Book cover of Staging the Third Reich: Essays in Cultural and Intellectual History

Are you tired of Hollywood clichés about Nazi culture? The Princeton historian Anson Rabinbach is your man. His brilliant essays on aspects of Nazi culture as diverse as the popular novel under Nazism, the Nazi-organized leisure industry, and the fate of the humanities at German universities between 1933 and 1945, provide the sharp, well-informed analysis you never got at school. Get started with the interview the author gave to two younger colleagues (pp. 450-480); here things become personal. Of course, Rabinbach is a pro, he knows the critical literature on the topic and cites it to differentiate his argument. But more importantly, his insights and arguments force you to rethink your response to German fascism, and to question the facile opposition of democracy and Nazism portrayed in American pop culture.  

Staging the Third Reich

By Anson Rabinbach, Stefanos Geroulanos (editor), Dagmar Herzog (editor)

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Staging the Third Reich as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A widely celebrated intellectual historian of twentieth-century Europe, Anson Rabinbach is one of the most important scholars of National Socialism working over the last forty years. This volume collects, for the first time, his pathbreaking work on Nazi culture, antifascism, and the after-effects of Nazism on postwar German and European culture. Historically detailed and theoretically sophisticated, his essays span the aesthetics of production, messianic and popular claims, the ethos that Nazism demanded of its adherents, the brilliant and sometimes successful efforts of antifascist intellectuals to counter Hitler's rise, the most significant concepts to emerge out of the 1930s and 1940s…


Who am I?

Spending my childhood in Nazi Germany, the nature and the horrific consequences of Nazi ideology have occupied me as a student of German history and later as a teacher of intellectual and literary history. In 1933 Car Schmitt opted to support the Nazis. While he was banned from the public sohere in post-war Germany, his ideas remained influential on the far right and the far left, fortunately without significantly impacting the democratic reconstruction of West Germany. It was the growing international visibility of Schmitt’s writings that became my personal concern after 2000. In particular, Schmitt’s increasing influence in the United States energized me to reread and respond to his writings.


I wrote...

Perilous Futures: On Carl Schmitt's Late Writings

By Peter Uwe Hohendahl,

Book cover of Perilous Futures: On Carl Schmitt's Late Writings

What is my book about?

The writings of the German legal theorist Carl Schmitt have been debated, cited, and adopted by both left- and right-wing thinkers with increasing frequency, though not without controversy given Schmitt's explicit support for the Nazi Party. 

The study focuses on Schmitt’s late work. After World War II Schmitt wrestles with such timely concerns as de-colonization, asymmetrical warfare, and the shifting international order. Against the backdrop of Schmitt’s persistent opposition to liberal democracy, the book charts his shift from a nationalist focus on Germany to a European and international agenda. 

The Last Nazi

By Andrew Turpin,

Book cover of The Last Nazi: A Joe Johnson Thriller, Book 1

From well-documented facts that the US government hid escaping Nazis after the war, comes a brutal story. This book has it all. Buried Nazi treasure, political wheeling and dealing, revenge, greed, and ruthless killers. Joe Johnson has been hunting war criminals for years after a stint in the CIA. When a story is leaked that Nazi treasure might finance the contender of the U.S. Republican party, Johnson is hired to ferret out the truth. But people don’t like having him poking into matters better left in the past. Can these types of people ever change or do they continue to hurt the weak for their own gains? From the United States to Argentina and England to Poland, this story just doesn’t stop until the last bullet is fired.

The Last Nazi

By Andrew Turpin,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Last Nazi as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Dark truths uncovered . . . The buried contents of a Nazi train. An aging SS killer—with a final sting in his tail. And the World War II secrets of a US presidential hopeful’s Jewish family, hidden in London for 70 years.

★★★★★ “A great read, has more twists than a country road.” — Amazon reviewer.

In this gripping thriller, war crimes investigator and ex-CIA officer Joe Johnson uncovers links between financing for the presidential campaign, the Nazi train, and a ruthless British blackmail plot.

But the mystery becomes bigger and more deeply personal than Johnson expects when it turns…


Who am I?

I can recommend this topic because of my interest in anything about WWII and the Nazi horror. It also comes from the recent revival of the ideology, even though the entire world fought to defeat them seventy years ago. I have been haunted by PTSD because of my experiences as a first responder and can speak to that personally. As a former reservist with the Canadian Armed Forces, I also have experience in firearms and munitions. I have recently written my own story, The Home Front, which deals with the rise of the neo-Nazis in the United States through the eyes of a WWII veteran.


I wrote...

The Home Front

By David Wickenden,

Book cover of The Home Front

What is my book about?

Cantankerous, old-fashion, and stubborn as hell, Donald Wilson was the first American soldier to enter Dachau, and has suffered with the horrors ever since. Now at ninety-five, he grapples with a recent pancreatic cancer diagnosis and believed there is nothing left to live for.

When neo-Nazis fire-bomb synagogues in his Pennsylvania hometown, he finds he has one last battle to fight. He only has months left to do this or the evil could rise again and plunge not only America, but the world back into the horrors of the Third Reich.

Speer

By Martin Kitchen,

Book cover of Speer: Hitler's Architect

Albert Speer is one of the most enigmatic figures within the Nazi leadership. I have always been intrigued by the fact that most biographies of him – including Gitta Sereny’s famous Speer: His Battle with Truth – have been fairly benign in their judgment of Speer’s character and deeds. Although directly responsible for the slave labour programme in the later stages of the war and a member of Hitler’s inner circle until the end in 1945, Hitler’s favourite architect managed to get away with a comparatively light sentence at the Nuremberg Trials, where he admitted partial responsibility. Handsome and well-spoken, Speer was often publicly perceived as one of the “less bad” Nazis. Martin Kitchen’s biography revises that image and convincingly shows the reader how intimately involved Speer was in many of the crimes of the Nazis.

Speer

By Martin Kitchen,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Speer as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A new biography of Albert Speer, Hitler's chief architect and trusted confidant, reveals the subject's deeper involvement in Nazi atrocities

"Kitchen, the author of a dozen works on twentieth-century Germany, comprehensively disassembles Speer's alibis and excuses. . . . His mastery of the revisionist evidence against Speer is complete."-John Fund, National Review Online

"Brilliant and devastating. . . . Kitchen lays out a case so airtight that one marvels anew how Speer survived the Nuremberg trials with his neck intact."-Martin Filler, New York Review of Books

In his best-selling autobiography, Albert Speer, Minister of Armaments and chief architect of Nazi…


Who am I?

Robert Gerwarth is a professor of modern history at University College. After completing his DPhil at Oxford, he has held visiting fellowships at Harvard, the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and the European University Institute in Florence. He is the author and editor of more than ten books on modern German history, most recently November 1918: The German Revolution.


I wrote...

Hitler's Hangman: The Life of Heydrich

By Robert Gerwarth,

Book cover of Hitler's Hangman: The Life of Heydrich

What is my book about?

Reinhard Heydrich is widely recognized as one of the great iconic villains of the twentieth century, an appalling figure even within the context of the Nazi leadership. Chief of the Nazi Criminal Police, the SS Security Service, and the Gestapo, ruthless overlord of Nazi-occupied Bohemia and Moravia, and leading planner of the "Final Solution," Heydrich played a central role in Hitler's Germany. He shouldered a major share of responsibility for some of the worst Nazi atrocities, and up to his assassination in Prague in 1942, he was widely seen as one of the most dangerous men in Nazi Germany. Yet Heydrich has received remarkably modest attention in the extensive literature of the Third Reich.

Robert Gerwarth weaves together little-known stories of Heydrich's private life with his deeds as head of the Nazi Reich Security Main Office. Fully exploring Heydrich's progression from a privileged middle-class youth to a rapacious mass murderer, Gerwarth sheds new light on the complexity of Heydrich's adult character, his motivations, the incremental steps that led to unimaginable atrocities, and the consequences of his murderous efforts toward re-creating the entire ethnic makeup of Europe.

Germans Into Nazis

By Peter Fritzsche,

Book cover of Germans Into Nazis

Fritzsche shows here how, from 1914 to 1933, middle class Germans were welded into the political block that supported Hitler. Another spellbindingly original book – among other things, Fritzsche shows very persuasively that the Great Depression had little to do with the rise of Hitler – the Nazis’ recipe of egalitarian but nationalist politics was already doing its work before 1929.

Germans Into Nazis

By Peter Fritzsche,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Germans Into Nazis as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Why did ordinary Germans vote for Hitler? In this dramatically plotted book, organized around crucial turning points in 1914, 1918, and 1933, Peter Fritzsche explains why the Nazis were so popular and what was behind the political choice made by the German people.

Rejecting the view that Germans voted for the Nazis simply because they hated the Jews, or had been humiliated in World War I, or had been ruined by the Great Depression, Fritzsche makes the controversial argument that Nazism was part of a larger process of democratization and political invigoration that began with the outbreak of World War…


Who am I?

I was a law school graduate heading for my first job when, unable to think of anything better to do with my last afternoon in London, I wandered through the First World War galleries of the Imperial War Museum. I was hypnotized by a slide show of Great War propaganda posters, stunned by their clever viciousness in getting men to volunteer and wives and girlfriends to pressure them. Increasingly fascinated, I started reading about the war and its aftermath. After several years of this, I quit my job at a law firm and went back to school to become a professor. And here I am.


I wrote...

The Death of Democracy: Hitler's Rise to Power and the Downfall of the Weimar Republic

By Benjamin Carter Hett,

Book cover of The Death of Democracy: Hitler's Rise to Power and the Downfall of the Weimar Republic

What is my book about?

Why did democracy fall apart so quickly and completely in Germany in the 1930s? How did a democratic government allow Adolf Hitler to seize power? In The Death of Democracy, Benjamin Carter Hett answers these questions, and the story he tells has disturbing resonances for our own time.

To say that Hitler was elected is too simple. He would never have come to power if Germany’s leading politicians had not responded to a spate of populist insurgencies by trying to co-opt him, a strategy that backed them into a corner from which the only way out was to bring the Nazis in. Hett lays bare the misguided confidence of conservative politicians who believed that Hitler and his followers would willingly support them, not recognizing that their efforts to use the Nazis actually played into Hitler’s hands. They had willingly given him the tools to turn Germany into a vicious dictatorship.

Max and Helen

By Simon Wiesenthal,

Book cover of Max and Helen: A Remarkable True Love Story

This novel is the story of an Eastern European Jewish man (Max), who is imprisoned by the Nazis during WW2 and by the Soviets immediately after. His story is amazing and is being told to famed Nazi hunter and the author of this book, Simon Wiesenthal, in the 1960's. Wiesenthal's involvement surrounds the Nazi camp commander who persecuted Max and his fiancée. The Nazi, Werner Schulze, resurfaces as a German plant manager twenty years after the war and Wiesenthal must decide whether or not he has sufficient evidence to prosecute him.

Max and Helen

By Simon Wiesenthal,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Max and Helen as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Relates the remarkable story of two Holocaust survivors who persuaded Wiesenthal not to pursue their Nazi tormentor, Werner Schultze


Who am I?

Simon Hammelburg is a Dutch author, journalist, and songwriter. During the seventies, he started his career as a news broadcaster with AVRO Broadcasting (Radio & TV) in Holland. He worked as an anchor as well as a travelling journalist. In the eighties, he became the United States Bureau Chief for Dutch and Belgian radio and television, as well as several newspapers and weeklies. He specialized in the psychological aftermath of the Shoah (Holocaust).


I wrote...

Broken on the Inside: The War Never Ended

By Simon Hammelburg,

Book cover of Broken on the Inside: The War Never Ended

What is my book about?

WWII did not end in 1945 when the few remaining survivors of the Holocaust were released from the concentration camps or came out of their hiding places. Often they were no longer welcome in the houses they were forced to leave behind. ‘Who invited you?’ Stripped from their belongings and dignity, they were forced to move on. Their children suffered too, as there was always fear, anxiety, and sadness about the countless relatives that were killed during this unrivaled genocide. Outsiders do not always realize this or that they themselves were victimized as well. Simon Hammelburg has collected the memoires of over 1200 survivors and their offspring. He presents the results of almost 25 years of psychological research in this unique, outstanding novel written in a sober journalistic style with a mixture of loving compassion, respect, and humorous dialogues. He introduces the reader to a world of sorrow, concern, and ultimate loneliness. An outstanding masterwork in which Hammelburg recounts the unspeakable.

The Man in the High Castle

By Philip K. Dick,

Book cover of The Man in the High Castle

Now, you may be thinking – hey, that’s an alternate history SF. And you’re right, but in my view, alternate history is a subset of multiverse novels. Dick’s book relies on an interpretation of an idea in quantum physics which answers the paradox of Schrödinger’s cat. (You know, the one where the cat is both alive and dead in the box, until you look at it – and then it’s one or the other?) The Many Worlds Interpretation (MWI) suggests that if the cat is alive in your world, it’s dead in another. There are two worlds because of that choice. And Dick’s book suggests just that. It’s set in a reality where the Axis powers won WWII and split America between Nazi Germany and the Japanese Empire. The book is truly haunting and disturbing. I was about thirteen or fourteen when I read it and it blew my mind…

The Man in the High Castle

By Philip K. Dick,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked The Man in the High Castle as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

'Dick's best work, and the most memorable alternative world tale...ever written' SCIENCE FICTION: THE 100 BEST NOVELS

It is 1962 and the Second World War has been over for seventeen years: people have now had a chance to adjust to the new order. But it's not been easy. The Mediterranean has been drained to make farmland, the population of Africa has virtually been wiped out and America has been divided between the Nazis and the Japanese. In the neutral buffer zone that divides the two superpowers lives the man in the high castle, the author of an underground bestseller, a…


Who am I?

Alpha Max is set in the multiverse, so I thought a list of other multiverse books would be a fun comparison. In my work, I’ve had a recurring character, Dr. Maximilian Tundra; a reader noted that he always seemed slightly different novel-to-novel. A very astute reader. You see, the whole time, all of my books took place in slightly different versions of my hometown. Parallel Earths! So, I thought it was time to let Max take center stage and explore why this might be. In this book, we get to meet not just one Max, but dozens of divergent Maxes from alternate realities. Mind-blowing stuff!


I wrote...

Alpha Max

By Mark A. Rayner,

Book cover of Alpha Max

What is my book about?

Maximilian Tundra is about to have an existential crisis of cosmic proportions. When a physical duplicate of him appears in his living room, wearing a tight-fitting silver lamé unitard and speaking with an English accent, Max knows something bad is about to happen. Bad doesn’t cover it. Max discovers he’s the only human being who can prevent the end of the world, and not just on his planet! In the multiverse, infinite Earths will be destroyed.

Personally, Max thinks the multiverse is in big trouble, because he can’t even keep his toenails clipped on the regular, let alone stop the apocalypse. His only “allies” are a race of manic pixie aliens and dozens of other versions of himself; and let’s face it, both groups are annoying as heck!

Book cover of Art, Ideology, and Economics in Nazi Germany: The Reich Chambers of Music, Theater, and the Visual Arts

This is one of the most influential studies of cultural politics in Nazi Germany which takes as its focus the bureaucracy Joseph Goebbels charged with integrating pre-National Socialist artists and their organizations into the new cultural and political order. Noteworthy, of course, throughout Steinweis’s masterpiece of institutional reconstruction, is the revelation that National Socialist aesthetic preferences were not novel but represented the appropriation of the prevailing conservative taste dominant in the late Weimar Republic.

Art, Ideology, and Economics in Nazi Germany

By Alan E. Steinweis,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Art, Ideology, and Economics in Nazi Germany as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

From 1933 to 1945, the Reich Chamber of Culture exercised a profound influence over hundreds of thousands of German artists and entertainers. Alan Steinweis focuses on the fields of music, theatre and the visual arts in this study of Nazi cultural administration, examining a complex pattern of interaction among leading Nazi figures, German cultural functionaries, ordinary artists, and consumers of culture. Steinweis gives special attention to Nazi efforts to purge the arts of Jews and other so-called undesirables.


Who am I?

I am a professor of English and Visual Culture at St. John’s University in New York. My research in recent years has focused on reexamining the fate of modernist art in Hitler’s Germany. I have chosen five books that have shaped our understanding of Nazi art and have new resonance with the present resurgence of fascism and authoritarian governments around the world.


I wrote...

Nostalgia for the Future: Modernism and Heterogeneity in the Visual Arts of Nazi Germany

By Gregory Maertz,

Book cover of Nostalgia for the Future: Modernism and Heterogeneity in the Visual Arts of Nazi Germany

What is my book about?

Based on previously unpublished sources and including more than 75 reproductions of paintings and sculptures not seen since the collapse of Nazi Germany, this book unearths the survival and repurposing of recognizable modernist styles in German art produced under the patronage of the Nazi Party and German government institutions—both before and after the infamous 1937 purge of “degenerate art” from state museums.  According to previous studies of Nazi art, this was not supposed to have happened!

The Face of the Third Reich

By Joachim C. Fest,

Book cover of The Face of the Third Reich

I found this book by the German scholar Joachim Fest many years ago at a flea market. Fest’s portrait of Hitler and a dozen high-ranking officials of the Third Reich became models for my own writing. Fest maps out the range of personalities—their cruelty, greed, and misplaced ideals—and the way in which Hitler encouraged rivalry among them to preserve absolute power for himself.

The Face of the Third Reich

By Joachim C. Fest,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Face of the Third Reich as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The Face of the Third Reich


Who am I?

Unlike most children of immigrants who were told nothing about the past, I grew up surrounded by family history—my grandfather’s village in Russia, my father’s memories of 1930s Europe, and my mother’s childhood on a migrant worker farm during the Great Depression. I realized that history isn’t just names and dates but a unique opportunity to study human behavior. I wrote Hammer of the Gods about the Thule Society because Thule was often mentioned in passing by historians of Nazi Germany, as if they were uncomfortable delving into an occult group recognized as influential on the Nazis. I decided I wanted to learn who they were and what they wanted.


I wrote...

Hammer of the Gods: The Thule Society and the Birth of Nazism

By David Luhrssen,

Book cover of Hammer of the Gods: The Thule Society and the Birth of Nazism

What is my book about?

Hammer of the Gods examines a network of secretive occult societies whose Munich branch, the Thule Society, founded the Nazi Party at the end of World War I as a front group for reaching the working class with some of their ideas. The Thule Society was anti-Semitic, invoked ancient Nordic gods, and was involved in paramilitary operations against leftist forces.

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