The best books that have a connection with trauma

Who am I?

I have a B.S. degree in Medical Technology and connect my stories with science. The more I began researching problematic issues in our society for the subject matter of my trilogy, the more I began to empathize with the different kinds of suffering that people endure. I’ve incorporated traumas in all of my Euphoria trilogy stories, from illicit drugs, illnesses, loss, burns, skin regeneration, and human trafficking. Societal awareness is my passion; presenting issues to people who don’t realize these problems are as widespread as they actually are. 


I wrote...

Saving Euphoria

By C. Becker,

Book cover of Saving Euphoria

What is my book about?

Mark Langley risked everything to protect his family. He was assaulted and burnt as his assailants tried to force information from him. Now his family believes he’s dead. As Mark recovers from his burns and PTSD, he must stay in the shadows and wait for the man behind the assault to return to the U.S.—even at the risk of losing his wife to another man.

Hailey Langley cannot accept her husband Mark is dead, but her children are grieving and she must bury her own needs to focus on maintaining some semblance of normalcy for her son and daughter.

The books I picked & why

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The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma

By Bessel Van Der Kolk,

Book cover of The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma

Why this book?

The Body Keeps the Score is well worth reading. I like how the book presented many cases to show how the brain processes information in traumas, or how it sometimes fails to process traumatic experiences. The author details in an easy-to-understand explanation how this failure can lead to PTSD. The book isn’t only about soldiers suffering from PTSD, but goes deeper into many real cases to show different reasons someone may have PTSD. I used the book for my research and learned about PTSD resulting from assault, adverse childhood traumas, and adult ordeals.


Twisted Lies

By C. B. Clark,

Book cover of Twisted Lies

Why this book?

I like how Twisted Lies addressed a young woman’s trauma and loss using fiction. C.B. Clark’s writing style flows smoothly and has a lot of description. Clark brings realistic problems like alcohol as a focus in the character’s life, but also intertwines romance and mystery in the characters. I laughed and cried as I read Twisted Lies. The case behind the story had me guessing up until the end.


The Sand Dancer

By Lydia Emma Niebuhr,

Book cover of The Sand Dancer

Why this book?

I found the novel The Sand Dancer a compelling mystery. I felt sorry for Carrie, the main character, who lost her parents when she was two years old. As I read about Carrie’s troubling life, bouncing from one foster family to another until she turned eighteen, I wanted her to find some answers to her past to have that closure and move on with her future. The suspense in this story is quite a page-turner. She showed that she was a strong woman and quick thinker.


Essential Art Therapy Exercises: Effective Techniques to Manage Anxiety, Depression, and PTSD

By Leah Guzman,

Book cover of Essential Art Therapy Exercises: Effective Techniques to Manage Anxiety, Depression, and PTSD

Why this book?

I really like how Essential Art Therapy Exercises focuses on creativity through art, photography, and writing, helping people work through their traumas, anxieties, or concerns. The creative projects in this book are so entertaining that it’s easy to forget there is more to therapy than just sharing the artwork. I enjoyed doing some of the paintings and drawings, and also trying one of the collage projects.


It's Ok That You're Not Ok: Meeting Grief and Loss in a Culture That Doesn't Understand

By Megan Devine,

Book cover of It's Ok That You're Not Ok: Meeting Grief and Loss in a Culture That Doesn't Understand

Why this book?

I found It’s OK That You’re Not OK to be a useful resource to gain insight and encouragement when dealing with loss and the grieving process. I learned it’s okay to be on my own timeline with grief. Though the author couldn’t cover examples of every type of loss, I thought there were core similarities in people’s grieving that gave readers validation as they concentrated on their own self-care when pushing through their struggles.


5 book lists we think you will like!

Interested in PTSD, foster care, and British Columbia?

5,809 authors have recommended their favorite books and what they love about them. Browse their picks for the best books about PTSD, foster care, and British Columbia.

PTSD Explore 52 books about PTSD
Foster Care Explore 24 books about foster care
British Columbia Explore 32 books about British Columbia

And, 3 books we think you will enjoy!

We think you will like Revolutionary Ride, Nonviolent Communication, and The Untethered Soul if you like this list.