The best naval warfare books

3 authors have picked their favorite books about naval warfare and why they recommend each book.

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Hitler's U-Boat War

By Clay Blair,

Book cover of Hitler's U-Boat War: The Hunters, 1939-1942

Yes, there was a naval war in the Atlantic, too. Had not the Allies defeated Hitler’s U-boats over a multi-year battle—the longest of the war—World War II would likely have been lost no matter the heroics in the Pacific. Hitler’s U-Boat War does for the Battle of the Atlantic what Blair did with Silent Victory for submarine actions in the Pacific. Hitler’s U-Boat War is exhaustive in detail—pick a boat or an engagement and Blair has chronicled it— but taken overall these volumes show the tenuous nature of the battle that was won in the aggregate by individual conflicts between hunter and hunted. Hitler’s U-Boat War makes a reliable desktop reference as well as a compelling read.

Hitler's U-Boat War

By Clay Blair,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Hitler's U-Boat War as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

"His monumental work...is the most thorough study of the U-boat campaign available."    --Library Journal

Hitler's U-boat War is an epic sea story about the most arduous and prolonged naval battle in history. For a period of nearly six years, the German U-boat force attempted to blockade and isolate the British Isles in hopes of forcing the British out of the war, thereby thwarting both the Allied strategic air assault on German cities and Operation Overlord, the Allied invasion of Occupied France. Fortunately for the Allies, the U-boat force failed to achieve either of these objectives, but in the attempt they…

Who am I?

Walter R. Borneman is an American military and political historian. He won the Samuel Eliot Morison Prize in Naval Literature for The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King, a national bestseller. Borneman's other titles include Brothers Down: Pearl Harbor and the Fate of the Many Brothers Aboard the USS Arizona; MacArthur at War: World War II in the Pacific; and 1812: The War That Forged a Nation.


I wrote...

The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King--The Five-Star Admirals Who Won the War at Sea

By Walter R. Borneman,

Book cover of The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King--The Five-Star Admirals Who Won the War at Sea

What is my book about?

Learn how history's only five-star admirals triumphed in World War II and made the United States the world's dominant sea power. Only four men in American history have been promoted to the five-star rank of Admiral of the Fleet: William Leahy, Ernest King, Chester Nimitz, and William Halsey. These four men were the best and the brightest the navy produced, and together they led the U.S. Navy to victory in World War II, establishing the United States as the world's greatest fleet.

Helmet for My Pillow

By Ross Leckie,

Book cover of Helmet for My Pillow: From Parris Island to the Pacific

Leckie enlisted in the Marine Corps following the attack on Pearl Harbor. His story is one of the best accounts of life on the ground in combat, from induction to his time on now famous islands, Guadalcanal, New Britain, and finally Peleliu. Leckie lets the reader in on the grinding, miserable combat of New Britain, the joyous affair of Peleliu, and the pet-names he has for the men around him. At the end of it all, Leckie finds himself in the hospital for the tenth time since he entered the Marine Corps, left wondering what it was all for.

Helmet for My Pillow

By Ross Leckie,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Helmet for My Pillow as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The inspiration behind the HBO series THE PACIFIC

Here is one of the most riveting first-person accounts to ever come out of World War 2. Robert Leckie was 21 when he enlisted in the US Marine Corps in January 1942. In Helmet for My Pillow we follow his journey, from boot camp on Parris Island, South Carolina, all the way to the raging battles in the Pacific, where some of the war's fiercest fighting took place. Recounting his service with the 1st Marine Division and the brutal action on Guadalcanal, New Britain and Peleliu, Leckie spares no detail of the…


Who am I?

I am Daniel Hammel and my father Eric Hammel was a prolific author and military historian. He specialized in the Marine Corps and specifically World War II. Though he has passed, several of these books, especially Day of Infamy, inspired him to become an author, where he wrote over 40 books. This list is an ode to my father, Eric, and to his many accomplishments.


I wrote...

Two Flags Over Iwo Jima: Solving the Mystery of the U.S. Marine Corps' Proudest Moment

By Eric Hammel,

Book cover of Two Flags Over Iwo Jima: Solving the Mystery of the U.S. Marine Corps' Proudest Moment

What is my book about?

The saga of the flags on Iwo Jima has fascinated America for decades. Hammel himself grew up in the company of WWII veterans and has always been intrigued by ‘The Photo’ of the flag, which became a powerful symbol of patriotism and national pride. But the story of how the flag got there, and even the identity of the soldiers in the photo, has been muddied by history. Eric Hammel here sets the record straight, viewing complex events through the lens of the story of the infantry company in which all the flag raisers served.

1812

By George C. Daughan,

Book cover of 1812: The Navy's War

There are many great books written about the fledgling US Navy that came into its own during the campaign of 1812.  As an Army officer, I was compelled to read them all when researching if my book, Old Ironsides, Eagle of the Sea if I were to compete with that of the ‘old saults’. George was challenged not only to define the complexities of the fledgling American frigates, but to contrast it with the proven rulers of the waves.  The British navy had not had a significant challenge since the magnificent history laid down by captain Horacio Nelson. The unpresented victories over the Royal Navy’s frigates were “uncalled for” according to the London Times. If there is one book to read about the epic struggle at sea, this is the one to choose.

1812

By George C. Daughan,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked 1812 as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

When war broke out between Britain and the United States in 1812, America's prospects looked dismal. British naval aggression made it clear that the ocean would be the war's primary battlefield,but America's navy, only twenty ships strong, faced a practiced British fleet of more than a thousand men-of-war. Still, through a combination of nautical deftness and sheer bravado, a handful of heroic captains and their stalwart crews managed to turn the tide of the war, besting the haughty skippers of the mighty Royal Navy and cementing America's newly won independence. In 1812: The Navy's War , award-winning naval historian George…

Who am I?

I am a retired Army Colonel, paratrooper, and aviator who served four tours in Vietnam as a platoon leader of combat photographers in the 173rd Airborne Infantry Brigade and later as a communication officer in the 1/10 Cavalry Squadron, 4th Infantry Division. Subsequently, I commanded six ties and operated the Moscow Hotline for three Presidents. On retirement, I lectured at the National Archives, Library of Congress, U.S. Naval Museum, and National Army Museum London England. I was also the guest lecturer at the Napoleonic fair, London. I conducted four one-hour television programs on my six books for C-Span Television and appeared on Fox News Network. I was awarded the Distinguished Book Prize from the US Army Historical Foundation and was granted the Military Order of Saint Louis by the Knights Templar, the priory of Saint Patrick, Manhattan, NY for contributions to Military Literature.


I wrote...

The Spy on Putney Bridge: A Mystery Novel of Espionage, Murder, and Betrayal in London

By David Fitz-Enz,

Book cover of The Spy on Putney Bridge: A Mystery Novel of Espionage, Murder, and Betrayal in London

What is my book about?

It is presumed that during WW I the British caught all of the German spies and either turned them or shot them. I believe you never get all of anything in war.

My book tells the saga of two German spies, a mother, and a son, who went undetected. Their story is unique but not impossible. How they did it will surprise; It was done from the inside out. It started with hurt feelings and when it was over there was a trail of blood outside of the battlefield. It couldn’t happen you think, after all, a real German spy was caught in Putney England by a dry cleaner on the high street. But these spies didn’t wear German clothes.

Book cover of The Terror Before Trafalgar: Nelson, Napoleon and the Secret War

Tom Pocock, a Naval Correspondent for The Times and Defence Correspondent for the London Evening Standard, has been described as the foremost authority on Admiral Nelson. But going past Nelson, in this book, he delves deeply into the lesser-known people that helped Nelson – and Britain – win the Napoleonic Wars, mission by mission, battle by battle.

This book is an absolute treasure-trove of information for anyone interested in the more secret ways Britain fought the first half of the Napoleonic Wars. “This book tells, through contemporary letters, journals, and newspapers, the gripping story of the secret war and of the shadowy but fascinating figures who did their utmost to undermine French plans.” This book inspired years of research – books and physical trips – that created The Tide Watchers. It brought the people of “the secret war” to life, American inventor Robert Fulton’s life in France, and the…

The Terror Before Trafalgar

By Tom Pocock,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Terror Before Trafalgar as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Nelson's victory at Trafalgar on 21 October 1805 was a pivotal event in European history. But Trafalgar was not simply an isolated battle fought and won in an afternoon - the naval campaign had in fact begun more than four years before. This extraordinary period, following Napoleon's threat to invade England in 1801, came to be known as The Great Terror, and Britain was on the alert. As the Grande Armee faced a Dad's army of English volunteers across the Channel, a secret war of espionage and subversion was fought in the shadows. New weapons - rockets, submarines and torpedoes…

Who am I?

I’m a very ordinary person. A history and literary nerd. A wife and mother. I don’t have any M.As or PhDs. I started teaching myself to write in 1991, and after joining the Romance Writers of America, Australia, and New Zealand, as well as Writing NSW (New South Wales), I had my first writing award, and first short story published in 1997. I got my first writing contract in 2000 (Silhouette Books, NY). I quit romance in 2012 to focus on historical fiction and YA, both of which I still love, and putting a little romance in there never hurts. I've given workshops and talks for the Historical Novel Societies of Australia and North America.


I wrote...

The Tide Watchers

By Lisa Chaplin,

Book cover of The Tide Watchers

What is my book about?

In early 2007 I was showing American friends around Sydney. I picked up a book whose subtitle is Nelson, Napoleon and the Secret War. I was hooked. Soon my friends had to remind me they were hungry! I read the book all the way home. A passing mention of Napoleon’s secret attempt to invade England in 1803 made me think, I have to know more...

Lucky for me, not long after, my husband and I moved...to Europe! It was the perfect ground for my research. Visiting the places the book spoke of, and speaking to local historians (and taking their tours) brought the hidden history to life – and learning about American inventor Robert Fulton’s life in France at the time, it brought to my mind the only way the invading ships could mysteriously sink 8 miles out to sea. And so The Tide Watchers was born.

Castles of Steel

By 0679456716,

Book cover of Castles of Steel: Britain, Germany, and the Winning of the Great War at Sea

Massie is a university-trained “popular” historian, that is, he writes especially for the broad, history-loving public audience rather than for professorial specialists. In Castles of Steel, his term for the biggest ships of that day, he succeeds in surveying the entire war at sea in World War One: the Pacific, the South Atlantic, the Caribbean, the Mediterranean, the U-boat (i.e. submarine) - infested sea lanes to Britain and France, and of course the critical North Sea, where Britain and Germany squared off against one another for the entire war (1914-1918), not just at Jutland. His fine, very well-written work serves as a lengthy introduction for readers wishing later to probe deeper into the various theaters of the war at sea.

Castles of Steel

By 0679456716,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Castles of Steel as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In August 1914 the two greatest navies in the world confronted each other across the North Sea. At first there were skirmishes, then battles off the coasts of England and Germany and in the far corners of the world, including the Falklands. The British attempted to force the Dardanelles with battleships - which led to the Gallipoli catastrophe. As the stalemate on the ground on the Western Front continued, the German Navy released a last strike against the British 'ring of steel'. The result was Jutland, a titanic and brutal battle between dreadnoughts. The knowledge, understanding and literary power Robert…

Who am I?

I retired from Drexel University in 2015 after thirty-six years as a professor of German and European History of the 19th and 20th Centuries. My sub-specialty in the History of Technology carried over into publications that over the years focused increasingly on the German army and navy.


I wrote...

Clash of the Capital Ships: From the Yorkshire Raid to Jutland

By Eric Dorn Brose,

Book cover of Clash of the Capital Ships: From the Yorkshire Raid to Jutland

What is my book about?

World War One witnessed the largest engagement between capital ships (i.e. battleships, battlecruisers, and heavy cruisers) in modern times, seventy-two altogether at 1916’s Battle of Jutland fought by antagonists Great Britain and Imperial Germany. Even more “battle wagons” clashed there than in World War Two showdowns at sea like 1944’s Leyte Gulf. Accordingly, hundreds of books have been written about Jutland, including a spate of new works as the centennial approached in 2016. I thought it was necessary to write yet another book that synthesized this vast literature and rendered judgments where historians still disagreed. I also paid special attention to circumstances on both the British and German sides that affected the outcome of the battle – the analysis had to be comparative, not narrowly nationalist. This costly battle, a very expensive British victory, contributed mightily to the allied defeat of Germany.  

The Civil War at Sea

By Craig L. Symonds,

Book cover of The Civil War at Sea

A lucid overview and fresh perspective will enlighten even a knowledgeable enthusiast of the topic while providing to new readers a solid grounding before engaging in more detailed studies. This short history by a foremost naval historian (170 pages plus ample notes and a bibliographical essay) fulfills both objectives. The chapters are thematic beginning with a review of the technological revolution in ships and guns, and then covering the distinct naval theaters from the encircling blockade, to the unique river war, major coastal campaigns, and worldwide commerce warfare. They contain insightful assessments of principal personalities including the secretaries of the navies and commanders on both sides. The flyleaf correctly describes the book as “an authoritative operational history of Civil War navies that is both readable and concise.”

The Civil War at Sea

By Craig L. Symonds,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Civil War at Sea as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This work provides an assessment of the crucial roles played by the Union and Confederate navies in the Civil War.

From Craig Symonds, author of the 2009 Lincoln Prize award-winner Lincoln and His Admirals, comes a fascinating look at the era when American naval power came of age. Thoroughly researched and excitingly written, it brings to light a wealth of new information on a pivotal aspect of the Civil War.

The Civil War at Sea covers navies on both sides of the conflict, examining key issues such as the impact of emergent technologies, the effectiveness of the Union's ambitious strategy…


Who am I?

I’m a lover of the sea, ships, seamen, and their histories, particularly of navies in the Civil War. After graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy (1967) with a history major, I served twenty years as a surface warfare officer (ship driver) on most oceans in ships ranging from destroyer to aircraft carrier and with river forces in Vietnam. I earned an M.A. in Political Science and an M.S. in Information Systems Management. Now as a historian, author, and speaker, I’m committed to communicating our naval heritage in an educational and entertaining manner for old hands and new generations. Writing about ships is the next best thing to driving them.


I wrote...

Unlike Anything That Ever Floated: The Monitor and Virginia and the Battle of Hampton Roads, March 8-9, 1862

By Dwight Sturtevant Hughes,

Book cover of Unlike Anything That Ever Floated: The Monitor and Virginia and the Battle of Hampton Roads, March 8-9, 1862

What is my book about?

“Ironclad against ironclad, we maneuvered about the bay here and went at each other with mutual fierceness,” reported a U.S. Navy officer following that momentous engagement. Monitor redefined the relationship between men and machines in war while the Virginia (ex USS Merrimack) imperiled the Union. Metal monstrosities pounded away for hours with little damage to either. Who won is still debated.

From flaming, bloody decks of sinking warships, to the dim confines of the first rotating armored turret and the smoky depths of a Confederate gundeck—with shells screaming, clanging, booming, and splashing all around—to the office of a worried president with his cabinet peering down the Potomac for a Rebel behemoth, the drama unfolds through accounts of those who lived it.

U-505

By James E. Wise, Jr,

Book cover of U-505: The Lone Wolf of Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry

The day I was born, the German U-boat U-505 lurked off the west coast of Africa, awaiting American and Allied ships. The submarine was part of the Nazi’s fleet of “wolfpacks,” terrorizing the Atlantic, and even the East and Gulf Coasts of the United States. The book tells about the capture of the submarine after it had carried out a dozen patrols, sinking eight ships. It was secretly towed to Bermuda where the crew interned at a U.S. POW camp. Codebooks, an Enigma machine, and other materials found on board bolstered Allied codebreakers.

The U-505 was eventually donated to the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, one of only four German WWII U-boats to survive as museum ships. The submarine was towed 3,000 miles from Portsmouth, NH, through the St. Lawrence River, and across four of the Great Lakes to Chicago. The logistics of getting the huge boat across traffic…

U-505

By James E. Wise, Jr,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked U-505 as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

On 4 June 1944 the German submarine U-505 became the first man-of-war captured by the US Navy in battle on the high seas since the War of 1812. Attacked by the American hunter-killer force Task Group 22.3 off the coast of West Africa, the 750-ton U-boat was forced to the surface, boarded by American sailors and secretly towed to Bermuda. Renamed USS Nemo, it made a war bond subscription tour before docking to await scrapping. The book offers a vivid description of these events and continues the story by explaining how U-505 became a major attraction at the Museum of…

Who am I?

I am the author of two books (the second is Leora’s Dexter Stories: The Scarcity Years of the Great Depression), a blogger, Iowa historian, and a regular contributor to Our American Stories. I’ve woven WII letters and newspaper clippings, along with memoirs and family stories, into the narrative. As Clabe and Leora Wilson’s oldest granddaughter, I also enjoy giving programs about the Wilson family, as well as TV and radio interviews.


I wrote...

Book cover of Leora's Letters: The Story of Love and Loss for an Iowa Family During World War II

What is my book about?

The five Wilson brothers of Dallas County, Iowa, enlisted. Only two came home. As the family optimist, their mother Leora wrote hundreds of letters, among all her regular chores, sending news and keeping up the morale of the whole family, which also included two daughters. Leora’s Letters is the compelling true account of a woman whose most tender hopes, of a home of her own and family living nearby, were disrupted by great losses. Yet she lived out four more decades with hope and tenacity and resilience.

After Jutland

By James Goldrick,

Book cover of After Jutland: The Naval War in Northern European Waters, June 1916-November 1918

Also published by the Naval Institute Press, Goldrick’s work smashes the widely held view that the German navy, allegedly so demoralized by its lesser losses at Jutland – but casualties that included flagship battlecruiser Lützow – that it never ventured to sea again. On the contrary, the German fleet, emboldened by inflicting much greater losses on the British, set to sea again in August 1916 reinforced with two new 15-inch-gun battleships. Even stronger in April 1918, it went out again, this time with Lützow’s replacement, Hindenburg. Jutland-like engagements almost occurred, but interesting circumstances prevented the two fleets from missing one another and another slugfest. Goldrick also details operations in the Baltic Sea as well as many other aspects of North Sea warfare after Jutland (e.g. mining campaigns) left out of other works.  

After Jutland

By James Goldrick,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked After Jutland as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

After Jutland analyzes the naval war in Northern European waters following the Battle of Jutland. A popular misconception is that Jutland marked the end of the operational career of the German High Sea Fleet and the beginning of a period of stagnation for both it and its opponents, Great Britain's Grand Fleet and Russia's Baltic Fleet. The reality is much more complex. The German battle fleet was quiescent for much of the time in the North Sea, but it supported an ambitious amphibious campaign in the Baltic, while a bitter war was waged by submarines and light craft in the…

Who am I?

I retired from Drexel University in 2015 after thirty-six years as a professor of German and European History of the 19th and 20th Centuries. My sub-specialty in the History of Technology carried over into publications that over the years focused increasingly on the German army and navy.


I wrote...

Clash of the Capital Ships: From the Yorkshire Raid to Jutland

By Eric Dorn Brose,

Book cover of Clash of the Capital Ships: From the Yorkshire Raid to Jutland

What is my book about?

World War One witnessed the largest engagement between capital ships (i.e. battleships, battlecruisers, and heavy cruisers) in modern times, seventy-two altogether at 1916’s Battle of Jutland fought by antagonists Great Britain and Imperial Germany. Even more “battle wagons” clashed there than in World War Two showdowns at sea like 1944’s Leyte Gulf. Accordingly, hundreds of books have been written about Jutland, including a spate of new works as the centennial approached in 2016. I thought it was necessary to write yet another book that synthesized this vast literature and rendered judgments where historians still disagreed. I also paid special attention to circumstances on both the British and German sides that affected the outcome of the battle – the analysis had to be comparative, not narrowly nationalist. This costly battle, a very expensive British victory, contributed mightily to the allied defeat of Germany.  

Seizing the Enigma

By David Kahn,

Book cover of Seizing the Enigma: The Race to Break the German U-boat Codes, 1939-1943

David Kahn explains the most widely-known effort (widely-known today but in complete secrecy then) to decipher messages sent by the Germans using their Enigma machines during World War II. This book looks at the groundbreaking work done by Polish mathematicians in the 1930s, how Enigma machines were rescued from sinking German U-boats, and how Bletchley Park in Britain became the focal point of breaking these transmissions. Much of the book focuses on how Enigma machines, rotors, and codebooks were confiscated from German submarines and surface vessels, and how these were then used to allow the Allies, by the war's end, to read German messages almost as quickly as the Germans could send them.

Seizing the Enigma

By David Kahn,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Seizing the Enigma as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Seizing the Enigma tells the thrilling story of the Royal Navy's battle to crack the Germans' supposedly unbreakable U-boat Enigma code, which would allow the vital Allied convoys in the North Atlantic to be routed away from Doenitz's wolfpacks. This battle was fought both on shore and at sea: by an assortment of scientists, chess champions and linguists, including Alan Turing, the father of the modern computer, who struggled to crack Enigma at Bletchley Park, and in the Atlantic by sailors and intelligence officers, such as Ian Fleming, the future creator of James Bond, who undertook dangerous and often fatal…


Who am I?

I have had the opportunity to write (I have written over 30 college textbooks on technology, most of them in the area of cybersecurity), study (my PhD dissertation was on cybersecurity), teach (I have taught at colleges and universities my entire career about technology, networking, and cybersecurity), and research (I have published numerous peer-reviewed journal articles) on the topic of cybersecurity. But I have always had a soft spot in my heart for the average computer user who struggles with how to protect their technology devices. This has helped drive my passion to focus on practical cybersecurity for everyone.


I wrote...

Security Awareness: Applying Practical Security in Your World

By Mark Ciampa,

Book cover of Security Awareness: Applying Practical Security in Your World

What is my book about?

Cybersecurity attacks are a major worry for technology users today. Yet cybersecurity defenses are a major puzzle for technology users today. What steps should you take to protect your technology? Which steps are the most important? How do you install software patches? Should you have antivirus software on your mobile device? What does a firewall do? How can you test your computer to know that it is not vulnerable? Knowing how to make and then keep technology devices secure can be a daunting task. This book provides you with the knowledge and tools you need to make your computer and related technology equipment—tablets, laptops, smartphones, and wireless networks—secure. The revised 6th edition will be available Fall 2022.

The U-boat War

By Lothar-Gunther Buchheim,

Book cover of The U-boat War

Related to Das Boot this may be (same author, same boat as within the novel) but this is a factual photographic essay of photos taken by Buchheim, predominantly aboard U96 during August-September 1941 as a member of the Propaganda Company. The photographs show life as it actually was in the North Atlantic on patrol, and end with shots taken aboard U309 as it escaped Brest in August 1944 and was involved in the rescue of crew from U981 which sank after hitting a mine with twelve crewmen killed.

This is, quite simply, a brilliant and evocative set of photographs. Buchheim was part of the propaganda machine that he so vocally lambasted in his later years, and, talking to U-boat veterans, opinions of him as a human being were extremely polarised. However, there can be no doubt about his mastery of the visual medium.

The U-boat War

By Lothar-Gunther Buchheim,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The U-boat War as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Chronicles submarine warfare in the North Atlantic during the Second World War, and describes the battles above and below the surface

Who am I?

I have been writing non-fiction Second World War history books since 2000 and just recently had my twenty-first published by Osprey. Most deal with aspects of the history of Germany’s U-boats. Though I have had a lifelong interest in military history, the desire to write about this topic began while living near Brest in Brittany, France. I am a scuba diving instructor and spent a great deal of time diving on wrecks left behind by the Kriegsmarine, all in the shadow of the huge U-boat bunkers created in Brest’s military harbour. Encouraged by authors Jon Gawne and Robert Strauss I submitted the proposal for the First U-Boat Flotilla to Pen & Sword in 2000…and it went from there. 


I wrote...

Schnellboote: A Complete Operational History

By Lawrence Paterson,

Book cover of Schnellboote: A Complete Operational History

What is my book about?

The Kreigsmarine’s S-boat service mirrors that of most naval components of Germany’s Third Reich. Involved in an unexpected war at a time when their service was barely beginning to recover from the previous conflict, it is a story of often startling military achievement against superior enemy forces before the long inexorable decline toward defeat six years later. While explaining their development from the ashes of the First World War, this book concentrates on their operational activities during the Second. 

It has never been fully covered in the English language, and S-boats and their importance to the Kriegsmarine continue to be grievously overlooked. This was my second book that deviates from my normal subject of the U-boat service. 

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