The best books about Georgia (USA) 📚

Browse the best books on Georgia (USA) as recommended by authors, experts, and creators. Along with notes on why they recommend those books.

Coming Fall 2022: The ability to sort this list by genre (signup here to follow our story as we build a better way to discover books).

Book cover of Red Dirt Zombies 1: The Battle for Roswell Georgia

Red Dirt Zombies 1: The Battle for Roswell Georgia

By Michael Peirce

Why this book?

Pierce writes intelligent military zompoc because he’d been in the thick of things during the Rhodesian war. He knows a thing or two about writing battle scenes because he’s done a thing or two in real life. This story is different because it isn’t about a tiny group of survivors trying to make through the apocalypse. It’s bigger in scope and encompasses one governor and the national guard doing all they can to hold the line against the undead hordes. Intelligent writing and “believable” scenarios set this military thriller apart from many of the rest.
From the list:

The best zombie books from someone who loves old monster movies

When you buy a book we may earn a small commission.

Book cover of Trees of Georgia and Adjacent States

Trees of Georgia and Adjacent States

By Claud L. Brown, L. Katherine Kirkman

Why this book?

Because Mr. Newcomb’s book (above) covers only herbs, shrubs, and vines, the survival student needs a good tree identifier (field guide) to cover “the standing people.” (The Cherokee name for “trees.”) Because I live in Georgia, this book serves me well. If you live outside of the Southeast, you’ll want to find a book germane to your area. Trees of Georgia contains good photographs of leaves, bark, flowers, buds, and fruits of over 200 species.

From the list:

The best books on nature education and survival skills

When you buy a book we may earn a small commission.

Book cover of Atlanta, 1847-1890: City Building in the Old South and the New

Atlanta, 1847-1890: City Building in the Old South and the New

By James Michael Russell

Why this book?

This book provides an excellent overview of Atlanta’s rise from humble beginnings as a rail hub before the Civil War to a thriving commercial center by the end of the century. Russell argues that the war accelerated Atlanta’s commercial and industrial development, but its path was already set before General William T. Sherman’s army arrived during the Civil War. White business elites dominated city politics until the election of Atlanta’s first Black mayor, Maynard Jackson, in 1973.

From the list:

The best books on 19th century Atlanta Georgia

When you buy a book we may earn a small commission.

Book cover of Secret Yankees: The Union Circle in Confederate Atlanta

Secret Yankees: The Union Circle in Confederate Atlanta

By Thomas G. Dyer

Why this book?

Founded as a rail center in the 1830s, Atlanta was dependent on commercial ties with the North which explains the city’s Unionism before the Civil War. In the pivotal election of 1860 where Lincoln carried the northern states and a “southern rights” candidate carried the deep South, Atlantans voted overwhelmingly for Unionist candidates John Bell and Stephen A. Douglas. Although their numbers diminished after secession, a small cadre of Unionists remained in the city during the war, including Cyrena Stone, whose secret (and fascinating) diary is both a major source for and an appendix in this book.

From the list:

The best books on 19th century Atlanta Georgia

When you buy a book we may earn a small commission.

Book cover of Atlanta, Cradle of the New South: Race and Remembering in the Civil War's Aftermath

Atlanta, Cradle of the New South: Race and Remembering in the Civil War's Aftermath

By William A. Link

Why this book?

This book looks at Atlanta’s role in the emergence of a “New South” and the way that journalist and civic leader Henry Grady used the story of Atlanta’s wartime burning and destruction and its postwar rebuilding to rebrand the city. While supporting segregation in the South, Grady urged northern Whites to invest in the New South economy and denied that the region had a race problem. Black Atlantans presented an alternate narrative, one that emphasized the war as a first step in the fight for freedom and equality. The Atlanta Race Riot of 1906 left Grady’s New South concept “tattered…

From the list:

The best books on 19th century Atlanta Georgia

When you buy a book we may earn a small commission.

Book cover of Killing Floor

Killing Floor

By Lee Child

Why this book?

The book that introduced the world to the iconic Jack Reacher has it all: a one-of-a-kind protagonist who’s larger than life; incredible tension from page one; an outstanding hook—Reacher getting arrested while minding his own business one hour after arriving in a small Georgia town and being charged with murder; lean prose (ala Hemingway) that fits the main character; and something that few reviewers mention—the incredible rhythm Child infuses into his prose. Because I have a music background, the rhythmic cadence that appears in so many scenes added great depth to my reading experience.

From the list:

The best debut mystery-thrillers of all time

When you buy a book we may earn a small commission.

Or, view all 22 books about Georgia (USA)

New book lists about Georgia (USA)

All book lists about Georgia (USA)

Bookshelves related to Georgia (USA)

Browse books by…