10 books like The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie

By Jennifer Ashley,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie. Shepherd is a community of 6,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Marrying Winterborne

By Lisa Kleypas,

Book cover of Marrying Winterborne

Okay, I’m cheating here a bit because Winterbourne isn’t a Scot. He’s Welsh!!!! I didn’t think a book boyfriend could get any sexier than a Scot until I discovered Rhys Winterbourne, a Welshman. Who knew? Imagine a dark hulk of a man, a commoner who clawed his way to unimaginable success. And then he meets Helen Ravenel, a delicate, retiring beauty, an aristocrat, the last person on earth he should want and yet he must have her. My heart breaks for this man. He can easily steamroll right over Helen, but she finds the strength within her to stand up for what she wants. The ending of this novel is so satisfying. I’ve read this book a dozen times and I’ll probably read it another dozen. I hope you do too! 

Marrying Winterborne

By Lisa Kleypas,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Marrying Winterborne as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A ruthless tycoon

Savage ambition has brought common-born Rhys Winterborne vast wealth and success. In business and beyond, Rhys gets exactly what he wants. And from the moment he meets the shy, aristocratic Lady Helen Ravenel, he is determined to possess her. If he must take her virtue to ensure she marries him, so much the better . . .

A sheltered beauty

Helen has had little contact with the glittering, cynical world of London society. Yet Rhys's determined seduction awakens an intense mutual passion. Helen's gentle upbringing belies a stubborn conviction that only she can tame her unruly husband.…


A Lady's Formula for Love

By Elizabeth Everett,

Book cover of A Lady's Formula for Love

I adore everything about the premise of this book—a secret society of lady scientists, working away in an old house in London, trying to invent solutions to the problems of the day. Yes please! I also love that Lady Violet is worldly. She's knowledgeable about physical relations between men and women, and she knows about her body, what she likes, and how to prevent pregnancy. She’s very down-to-earth, empowered, and sex-positive, and she brings our brooding hero Arthur to his knees. There’s something very special about historical fiction with a modern sentimentality. Add to that a swoon-worthy hero, a cast of colorful side characters, and dark forces working against our heroine, and you’ve got a recipe for the perfect start to a super fun series.

A Lady's Formula for Love

By Elizabeth Everett,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Lady's Formula for Love as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Redeeming the Reclusive Earl

By Virginia Heath,

Book cover of Redeeming the Reclusive Earl

I was taken by this book from the moment I read the description. An intrepid archaeologist and fossil hunter trespassing on the lands of a hermit who literally wants her to get off his lawn? What could possibly go wrong! In Effie we have another heroine who is interested in science, knows her own biology, and is quite willing to explore it with the right sort of man. She’s a virgin, but she’s not a wilting young flower. She’s more of a curious pragmatist. In Max we have another damaged hero, and oh my goodness I am a sucker for a hero with terrible events in his past which have left him with physical scars as well as mental ones. I also love a good grumpy sunshine trope.

Redeeming the Reclusive Earl

By Virginia Heath,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Redeeming the Reclusive Earl as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

His heart is a fortress.

And she's trespassing!

After losing all he holds dear in a horrific fire, Max Aldersley, Earl of Rivenhall, shuns the world - until he catches Effie Nithercott digging holes on his estate! He banishes the intrepid archaeologist and the disturbing feelings she rouses within him. But she returns even more determined and infuriatingly desirable than before! He's determined she'll never reach the man beneath the scars...no matter how deep she digs!


A Lady for a Duke

By Alexis Hall,

Book cover of A Lady for a Duke

I was a little afraid to read this one at first but should have known better. I was afraid the main conflict would revolve around bigotry towards the heroine. Instead it’s a cozy exploration of self-acceptance. Lyrically beautiful writing paints a picture of the world almost as it should be, where bigotry is acknowledged as existing and that potential does drive some of the internal conflict, but not in an intrusive way. Unlike some of my other selections, Viola isn’t particularly experienced or worldly. She has closed herself off from the world and it’s up to Gracewood to draw her out again. This story of a young woman settling into her true self and the best friend who is desperately happy to get to know her again is a friends-to-lovers masterpiece.

A Lady for a Duke

By Alexis Hall,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Lady for a Duke as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


A Rogue of One's Own

By Evie Dunmore,

Book cover of A Rogue of One's Own

This second book in the series A League of Extraordinary Women is an enemies-to-lovers tale of ardent feminist and suffragist Lucie who has no use for men and absolutely no use for foppish rake Tristan. She’s far too busy trying to save the world. As someone who wishes they could solve every ill of modern society single-handedly, I identified with this aspect of her character so hard. And then there’s Tristan. He’s probably the only hero on my list who qualifies as a rogue, but he wears that reputation-like armor against an abusive father, from whom he’s attempting to rescue his beloved mother. I may have mentioned that a hero with a tragic past is absolute catnip to me. Trigger warning on this one, colonialist themes play a larger role than in most regencies.

A Rogue of One's Own

By Evie Dunmore,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Rogue of One's Own as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


When a Scot Ties the Knot

By Tessa Dare,

Book cover of When a Scot Ties the Knot: Castles Ever After

Tessa Dare makes me laugh. Out loud. In When a Scot Ties the Knot, Madeline is pretty and talented, but terribly awkward. The last thing she wants to do is go through the agony of a London season. Fortunately, she avoids the London marriage mart by inventing a sweetheart, Captain Mackenzie, who is conveniently never around because he’s in the army. She pens long, romantic letters to her perfect lover and spins grand tales of their deep affection for each other. When her family puts pressure on her, she relates the devasting news that her captain is dead. Fast forward a couple of years and guess who arrives on her doorstep. What happens next is so much fun!

When a Scot Ties the Knot

By Tessa Dare,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked When a Scot Ties the Knot as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The Sinful Scot

By Maddison Michaels,

Book cover of The Sinful Scot

In The Sinful Scot, Maddison Michaels combines mystery and romance, two of my favorite kinds of novels. Viewed from the outside, Constance Campbell has the perfect life. The truth is, her husband, the duke, keeps her prisoner in a living hell. When her husband turns up dead in her bed, she is framed for his murder. 

Dr. Alec McGuiness has always known his origins were too humble for the likes of Constance, but he has never stopped loving her, so when she turns to him for help, he has to save her. In my opinion, there is nothing so painful as loving someone who can never love you back. This one has all the feels.

The Sinful Scot

By Maddison Michaels,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Sinful Scot as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


A Scot in the Dark

By Sarah MacLean,

Book cover of A Scot in the Dark: Scandal & Scoundrel, Book II

I’ve never met a Sarah Maclean book I didn’t love and this one is quite possibly my absolute favorite of hers. She always comes through with a hooky yet believable feminist heroine protagonist who knows what she is about and refuses to fit into the narrow confines of a woman’s role drawn by society. Also appealing are her male protagonists, usually brooding, deeply flawed, and the only human powerful enough in character and intelligence to measure up to his female counterpart. You will love the scandalous siren and the Highland devil. They are unforgettable. 

A Scot in the Dark

By Sarah MacLean,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Scot in the Dark as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Lestrade and the Ripper

By M.J. Trow,

Book cover of Lestrade and the Ripper

No true crime list would be complete without reference to the infamous Jack the Ripper, and of the many books I have read, this one stands out. True, the subject is gory, and for that reason, some might think that humour is out of place, but I like the bumbling detective Lestrade, and the author clearly knows his stuff. The detailed historical research accurately portrays the setting and times of the novel. Trow brings a different approach to a Sherlock Holmes-type story with an easy-to-read and witty style in a book well worth trying.

Lestrade and the Ripper

By M.J. Trow,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Lestrade and the Ripper as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Kingdom of the Wicked

By Kerri Maniscalco,

Book cover of Kingdom of the Wicked

This book gave family secrets a whole new meaning. You're immediately pulled deep into the world of demons and death, with everything you thought you knew unraveling the farther in you get. You’ll also get to meet Wrath, which I promise you, you won’t regret (or forget!). I guarantee you the mystery will pull you in and never let you go.

Kingdom of the Wicked

By Kerri Maniscalco,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Kingdom of the Wicked as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Two sisters. One brutal murder. A quest for vengeance that will unleash Hell itself . . .

A new series from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Stalking Jack the Ripper.

Emilia and her twin sister Vittoria are streghe - witches who live secretly among humans, avoiding notice and persecution. One night, Vittoria misses dinner service at the family's renowned Sicilian restaurant. Emilia soon finds the body of her beloved twin . . . desecrated beyond belief. Devastated, Emilia sets out to find her sister's killer and to seek vengeance at any cost-even if it means using dark…


5 book lists we think you will like!

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