The best books about miscarriage

1 authors have picked their favorite books about miscarriage and why they recommend each book.

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The Miscarriage Map

By Sunita Osborn,

Book cover of The Miscarriage Map: What To Expect When You Are No Longer Expecting

This is a book written by a psychologist who herself experienced a miscarriage that traumatized her. The author is frank and open about her own feelings and those of her husband. I like how beneficial this is: it brings a sense of normality to feelings women have that may seem frightening to them. There are also suggestions of what can help, as well as supplemental recommended readings. The book is a combination of memoir, reading companion, and advice-provider. 


Who am I?

I am a psychiatrist-novelist. As a psychiatrist, I’ve seen many patients struggling with infertility and miscarriage. As a novelist, I became intrigued with the idea of having false pregnancy (pseudocyesis) be a key element in a character’s life. My primary goal was to create an engrossing good read. I also wanted to show the psychological trauma of infertility/miscarriage. Another goal was to portray psychiatric patients, the psychiatrists who treat them, and psychiatry in a realistic way. I’m so gratified by the reader reviews: “gripping”...“spell-binding”...“rich, satisfying read”...“a page-turner”...“Illuminating”.  


I wrote...

The End of Miracles: A Novel

By Monica Starkman,

Book cover of The End of Miracles: A Novel

What is my book about?

The End of Miracles is a novel that brings readers up close to a suspenseful journey, fueled by loss, across the boundaries between sanity and depression, madness and healing.

After years battling infertility, a woman’s seemingly-miraculous pregnancy brings joy. The pregnancy, however, ends tragically in a late miscarriage. Margo is devastated and emotionally shaken. Soon, though, she feels pregnant again and joy returns. But this pregnancy is false. Inevitably, her fantasy clashes with the reality of an ultrasound. Margo unravels psychologically, and her concerned husband takes her to a psychiatric unit. Fearing that the sometimes-chaotic environment there is making her worse, Margo seizes an opportunity to flee. Alone on the city streets, new fantasies propel her to impulsively commit a startling act with harrowing and dangerous consequences for herself and others.

Something Happened

By Cathy Blanford, Phyllis Childers (illustrator),

Book cover of Something Happened

Children who have known their mother was pregnant with their sibling and then had a miscarriage have psychological needs that must be met. They notice an emotional change in their parents, but don’t understand why that is. And their own hopes, or fears, about a sibling -  companion or rival - are likely still there, unanswered. The best course is to give the child the opportunity to address these feelings and fears. As a psychiatrist, I am keenly aware of the child's need for this - as well as the difficulty it may pose for the grieving parents. A sensitive and informed picture book like this one is a good tool for parents to use with young children.  


Who am I?

I am a psychiatrist-novelist. As a psychiatrist, I’ve seen many patients struggling with infertility and miscarriage. As a novelist, I became intrigued with the idea of having false pregnancy (pseudocyesis) be a key element in a character’s life. My primary goal was to create an engrossing good read. I also wanted to show the psychological trauma of infertility/miscarriage. Another goal was to portray psychiatric patients, the psychiatrists who treat them, and psychiatry in a realistic way. I’m so gratified by the reader reviews: “gripping”...“spell-binding”...“rich, satisfying read”...“a page-turner”...“Illuminating”.  


I wrote...

The End of Miracles: A Novel

By Monica Starkman,

Book cover of The End of Miracles: A Novel

What is my book about?

The End of Miracles is a novel that brings readers up close to a suspenseful journey, fueled by loss, across the boundaries between sanity and depression, madness and healing.

After years battling infertility, a woman’s seemingly-miraculous pregnancy brings joy. The pregnancy, however, ends tragically in a late miscarriage. Margo is devastated and emotionally shaken. Soon, though, she feels pregnant again and joy returns. But this pregnancy is false. Inevitably, her fantasy clashes with the reality of an ultrasound. Margo unravels psychologically, and her concerned husband takes her to a psychiatric unit. Fearing that the sometimes-chaotic environment there is making her worse, Margo seizes an opportunity to flee. Alone on the city streets, new fantasies propel her to impulsively commit a startling act with harrowing and dangerous consequences for herself and others.

An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination

By Elizabeth McCracken,

Book cover of An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination

This extraordinary book combines a lived experience with the powerful writing of an accomplished author.  Unexpectedly, in her mid-thirties, she finds a man to love and a baby is on the way. But then, the agony:  the baby dies in utero in the ninth month. She tackles head-on the deepest feelings and questions this brings. I like the way she unsparingly describes her experience and her grief, and then how she processes this and finds a way to move on. 


Who am I?

I am a psychiatrist-novelist. As a psychiatrist, I’ve seen many patients struggling with infertility and miscarriage. As a novelist, I became intrigued with the idea of having false pregnancy (pseudocyesis) be a key element in a character’s life. My primary goal was to create an engrossing good read. I also wanted to show the psychological trauma of infertility/miscarriage. Another goal was to portray psychiatric patients, the psychiatrists who treat them, and psychiatry in a realistic way. I’m so gratified by the reader reviews: “gripping”...“spell-binding”...“rich, satisfying read”...“a page-turner”...“Illuminating”.  


I wrote...

The End of Miracles: A Novel

By Monica Starkman,

Book cover of The End of Miracles: A Novel

What is my book about?

The End of Miracles is a novel that brings readers up close to a suspenseful journey, fueled by loss, across the boundaries between sanity and depression, madness and healing.

After years battling infertility, a woman’s seemingly-miraculous pregnancy brings joy. The pregnancy, however, ends tragically in a late miscarriage. Margo is devastated and emotionally shaken. Soon, though, she feels pregnant again and joy returns. But this pregnancy is false. Inevitably, her fantasy clashes with the reality of an ultrasound. Margo unravels psychologically, and her concerned husband takes her to a psychiatric unit. Fearing that the sometimes-chaotic environment there is making her worse, Margo seizes an opportunity to flee. Alone on the city streets, new fantasies propel her to impulsively commit a startling act with harrowing and dangerous consequences for herself and others.

Stork

By Shane McKenzie,

Book cover of Stork

Suzey suffered physical and psychological abuse at the hands of her deplorable grandmother, who used the Stork fairytale to convince her that she was a worthless, evil creature without a soul. Years later, Suzey is still battling the stork, convinced that it is responsible for her inability to have a baby.

McKenzie is another great author who can weave elements of gore and depravity into an engrossing story full of great, well-developed characters. This one was especially superb and will keep you on the edge of your seat as you witness Suzey’s downward spiral.


Who am I?

I've been a passionate lover of all things horror. I strive to take my readers on an unforgettable journey, one that often places them well out of their comfort zone. I believe that horror should make readers uncomfortable, whether through a mounting sense of unease or full-blown exposure to gore and depravity. I do my best to pull readers into my stories so that they can almost personally experience the horrors. If I don’t make them cringe and wince, then I have failed. As outrageous as my books may be, they're not full of violence and gore for the sake of mere shock value. I do my best to create well-developed characters with thought-provoking and immersive storylines. 


I wrote...

Man Cave

By Angel Gelique,

Book cover of Man Cave

What is my book about?

Because bad things happen....When Sophie and Amber leave their college campus and travel across the state in pursuit of love, they find lust instead. Or rather, the lustful, sadistic man they know only as Ben. Abducted and held within Ben's dirty garage, things rapidly turn grim for Sophie and Amber who are repeatedly tortured, raped, and abused in horrific ways--physically, mentally, and emotionally. With an unquenchable thirst for savagery, Ben's brutality increases with each passing day, leaving the poor young women entirely at his mercy. Unfortunately for them, his ability to be merciful is about as limited as his supply of morals.

Will Sophie and Amber find a way to escape? Will they survive the depravity? Or will their lives end there in Ben's deplorable man cave?

The Light Between Oceans

By M.L. Stedman,

Book cover of The Light Between Oceans

This book was my own personal cheerleader and inspiration when I was writing my own book, because the place in this novel was a legitimate character alongside the humans; the landscapes, the sea, the lighthouse, the storms, the isolation... all of those elements affected me as much as the characters did, so it became a perfect combination of things to make for a compelling narrative of love and loss. This book was on my nightstand the entire time I was writing my novel, and even though I never met her, and probably never will, ML Stedman will always be one of my muses. Her writing is truly remarkable.


Who am I?

I've always been a natural storyteller, and as an only child of Ukrainian immigrants, I carry all the stories with me. I realized as an adult that if I didn't write them down, they would dissipate and vanish. So, I wanted to write stories not only for myself, but in order to connect to others and inspire them to learn about their own family stories. We're all connected on this planet like a giant village, and I've always loved talking to people and learning about who they are. The core of my work centers around humans and loss and hope, and seeing how each of those things are affected by the environment around them.


I wrote...

The Child of Ukraine

By Tetyana Denford,

Book cover of The Child of Ukraine

What is my book about?

Based on true events, this book is an epic story of love, loss, betrayal, and hope... one Ukrainian family's search to find their place in the world after escaping Ukraine during WWII.

The Snow Child

By Eowyn Ivey,

Book cover of The Snow Child

I first came across the Russian folk story that this novel is based on when I was a child. "The Little Daughter of the Snow" was my absolute favourite story in Arthur Ransome’s Old Peter’s Russian Stories. 

In Eowin Ivey’s book, Mabel and Jack have lost their only child. They try to make a new life among the forests and snows of Alaska. They build a little girl of snow, which melts, but a real child, Faina, emerges from the woods and they take her in as their own. They love her desperately, but their nights are haunted by darkness and fears, dreams of dead babies, and their knowledge of the Russian fairy tale. Faina yearns to live in the snow, where she belongs. It’s a beautifully atmospheric book about enchantment, darkness, and love.


Who am I?

Much of my writing is influenced by Fairy Stories. Sometimes I retell the stories in my own words, sometimes I create my own, and sometimes, as in Rose Doran Dreams, I weave them into the narrative so that they shape the central character in a way that affects or explains her development. There is a darkness about Fairy Stories that fascinates me, that gives psychological depth to a character or a narrative as I write. I am dizzy with the notion that Fairy Stories don’t belong to the teller or the writer, the listener or the reader; they transcend time and place. 


I wrote...

Rose Doran Dreams

By Berlie W. Doherty,

Book cover of Rose Doran Dreams

What is my book about?

As a child, Rose was fed fairy stories by her brother, and then her teacher. Her favourite was The Fisherman and His Wife, about the magic fish and the woman who rejects all that her wishes bring. But it is Rose who faces rejection, from her parents, her teacher, her lover the dancer, her stolen child, her husband. Her strange, exotic neighbour Paedic is a fantasist, and in their shared stories and dreams Rose finds a kind of fulfillment. As their stories become darker and more disturbing she begins to lose touch with reality.

Motherhood

By Ann Campanella,

Book cover of Motherhood: Lost and Found: A memoir

Ann Campanella’s memoir details her journey through caregiving for her mother with Alzheimer’s at the same time she was struggling to start her own family. I felt it all: the anxiety, the frustration, as well as the pain, as she watched her mother decline while coping with an inability to conceive. Ann’s book reminded me to appreciate life’s joys, no matter how small, whether riding a beloved horse, marveling at a sunset, smelling a beautiful flower, or offering a simple hug. 


Who am I?

I am a caregiver who became an author. Both my parents had dementia. I found few books written from a personal perspective to give me guidance, so the journal I kept ultimately became the book I wished I could have read during our dementia journey. The journey didn’t end for me with the death of my parents. It led me to form a non-profit with two other dementia authors. This passion project has become a global community of authors who have written about Alzheimer’s and dementia from personal experience. Now more than 300 strong, we provide quality resources for caregivers and others concerned about dementia. Learn more at AlzAuthors.com.


I wrote...

Somebody Stole My Iron: A Family Memoir of Dementia

By Vicki Tapia,

Book cover of Somebody Stole My Iron: A Family Memoir of Dementia

What is my book about?

A few months after my father was diagnosed with Parkinson’s-related dementia, Mom was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and I became their family caregiver. My book grew out of the journal I kept as the three of us traveled the dementia journey together.

My memoir shares our story, laced with both humor and sadness, sprinkled with the ever-present "caregiver guilt." It weaves together my insights and the lessons I learned, offering the reassurance that you aren’t alone. Somebody Stole My Iron has been called "a must-read" for anyone experiencing the countless emotional ups and downs that accompany caregiving.

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