33 books like The House of Lords in the Parliaments of Edward VI and Mary I

By Michael A. R. Graves,

Here are 33 books that The House of Lords in the Parliaments of Edward VI and Mary I fans have personally recommended if you like The House of Lords in the Parliaments of Edward VI and Mary I. Shepherd is a community of 9,000+ authors and super readers sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Book cover of The House of Lords, 1603-1649: Structure, Procedure, and the Nature of Its Business

Coleman A. Dennehy Author Of The Irish Parliament, 1613–89: The evolution of a colonial institution

From my list on how parliaments worked.

Who am I?

I am a historian of early modern law and parliaments in Ireland and Britain, having written several books and articles on the topic, and am also a criminologist. I have had an interest in the history of parliaments for many years, in particular the manner in how they operate, how they were staffed, and how they worked (or in some cases didn’t work). Although political histories are interesting and sometimes important, parliamentary political history does not interest me as much. I love the practical application of how institutions operated and what they can tell us that conventional histories of political development and parliamentary politics can not.   

Coleman's book list on how parliaments worked

Coleman A. Dennehy Why did Coleman love this book?

This is a superb book. It is a comprehensive consideration of the business record of the upper house. What I personally find to be the more entertaining and interesting house of parliament, Foster has a rare ability of making the complex matters accessible, and making what might seem to be archaic or irrelevant procedures understood in their proper context. Despite the fact that the Lords could sometimes be consumed by seemingly unimportant issues such as hats and privilege, these episodes are expertly deciphered with a view to helping the reader understand that these issues were not just important to individuals at the time, but a brilliant window onto the nobility and how it was affected by the conflagration that was the Stuart period

By Elizabeth Read Foster,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The House of Lords, 1603-1649 as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Foster discusses both the structure of the House and its business, including studies of the officers, the fee system by which they were paid, the function of the judges and attorney general, the select committees and their appointment, the committee of the whole House that developed during this period and its significance, and the joint committees that became increasingly important during the civil war years. The study also contributes to the understanding of later parliaments.

Originally published in 1983.

A UNC Press Enduring Edition - UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books…


Book cover of The Irish Parliament In The Middle Ages

Coleman A. Dennehy Author Of The Irish Parliament, 1613–89: The evolution of a colonial institution

From my list on how parliaments worked.

Who am I?

I am a historian of early modern law and parliaments in Ireland and Britain, having written several books and articles on the topic, and am also a criminologist. I have had an interest in the history of parliaments for many years, in particular the manner in how they operate, how they were staffed, and how they worked (or in some cases didn’t work). Although political histories are interesting and sometimes important, parliamentary political history does not interest me as much. I love the practical application of how institutions operated and what they can tell us that conventional histories of political development and parliamentary politics can not.   

Coleman's book list on how parliaments worked

Coleman A. Dennehy Why did Coleman love this book?

Although it sometimes changes, if I were forced to choose, this is probably my most favourite history book. Even though it is now seventy years old, it still reads remarkably up-to-date. Like many of the other books on this list, it eschews the political history of parliament in order to focus on the institutional and developmental history of the medieval Irish assembly. Whilst a book with chapters on medieval taxation and the feudal state might not seem to many as being as fascinating, the passion and drive that is clearly evident in the authors is something that immediately infects the reader. The argument is jumping off the page and slapping you across the face. More than proficient in English medieval history too, they are somewhat of a rarity in written history of the islands in that they seamlessly slide from one to the other. The fact that it was a…

By H. G. Richardson, G. O. Sayles,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Irish Parliament In The Middle Ages as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Based largely on manuscript material, this comprehensive account of the Irish Parliament in the Middle Ages shows that early Irish parliaments cannot be identified either in form or function with their modern namesake and, consequently, demonstrates that the concept of governmental democracy had a much slower, more gradual development than historians have heretofore believed.
The history of the Irish Parliaments proper begins with that held at Castledermot in mid-June 1264. During the reign of Edward II and the early years of Edward III significant changes took place-changes, the authors, point out, similar to those taking place in the development of…


Book cover of Bills and Acts: Legislative Procedure in Eighteenth-Century England

Coleman A. Dennehy Author Of The Irish Parliament, 1613–89: The evolution of a colonial institution

From my list on how parliaments worked.

Who am I?

I am a historian of early modern law and parliaments in Ireland and Britain, having written several books and articles on the topic, and am also a criminologist. I have had an interest in the history of parliaments for many years, in particular the manner in how they operate, how they were staffed, and how they worked (or in some cases didn’t work). Although political histories are interesting and sometimes important, parliamentary political history does not interest me as much. I love the practical application of how institutions operated and what they can tell us that conventional histories of political development and parliamentary politics can not.   

Coleman's book list on how parliaments worked

Coleman A. Dennehy Why did Coleman love this book?

This book is fascinating for many reasons, but in particular this work defines the nature of the relationship between the institution of parliament, the relatively new role of the parliamentary agent (in particular in this case, Robert Harper), and the community of landowners and others who needed to get private bills and local bills passed through parliament. Lambert's real achievement is the depth and level of expertise that she developed in this book on the minute detail of the procedure alongside the rough-and-tumble of parliamentary agency, bringing the local into contact with the very core of the legislative and judicial state. It's essentially about interaction.  

By Sheila Lambert,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Bills and Acts as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The eighteenth century witnessed both a notable increase in the amount of legislation passed in each parliamentary session as a response to the changing economic and social climate, and the development of new forms of parliamentary practice which foreshadowed the much better known innovations of the nineteenth century. In consequence, Parliament gained much greater influence over the everyday life of the community, and the new profession of parliamentary agent developed to assist landowners and local communities in their dealings with Parliament. The study centres round the work of Robert Harper of Lincoln's Inn, an eminent conveyancer whose active career as…


Book cover of The Parliament of England, 1559–1581

Coleman A. Dennehy Author Of The Irish Parliament, 1613–89: The evolution of a colonial institution

From my list on how parliaments worked.

Who am I?

I am a historian of early modern law and parliaments in Ireland and Britain, having written several books and articles on the topic, and am also a criminologist. I have had an interest in the history of parliaments for many years, in particular the manner in how they operate, how they were staffed, and how they worked (or in some cases didn’t work). Although political histories are interesting and sometimes important, parliamentary political history does not interest me as much. I love the practical application of how institutions operated and what they can tell us that conventional histories of political development and parliamentary politics can not.   

Coleman's book list on how parliaments worked

Coleman A. Dennehy Why did Coleman love this book?

In many ways this book is perhaps the culmination of Elton's considerable published output on parliament, and one where he vociferously defends his outlook on the early Elizabethan English parliament. It is notable that he does spend some time attacking his previous mentor and supervisor, Sir John Neale, in a way that some readers may find more harsh than necessary. Nevertheless, when discussing parliament, the 'puritan choir', and what Elton terms the 'myth of an opposition,' he is producing parliamentary history of the highest order with an insight and writing style that makes for a book that would be difficult to surpass. Like Richardson & Sayles above, Elton's passion for this topic is clearly evident. Like all other authors in this list, he takes what might seem like a mundane topic to the uninformed and uninitiated, and brings it very much to life.  

By G. R. Elton,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Parliament of England, 1559–1581 as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This is a comprehensive account of the parliament of early modern England at work, written by the leading authority on sixteenth-century English, constitutional and political history. Professor Elton explains how parliament dealt with bills and acts, discusses the many various matters that came to notice there, and investigates its role in political matters. In the process he proves that the prevailing doctrine, developed by the work of Sir John Neale, is wrong, that parliament did not acquire a major role in politics; that the notion of a consistent, body of puritan agitators in opposition to the government is mere fiction…


Book cover of The Book of Wonder

Robert Evert Author Of Sword of Betrayal

From my list on forgotten fantasies.

Who am I?

Although I was part of a large family, I frequently felt alone growing up. While my siblings were busy playing sports or running around with their friends, I sat by myself in the basement, reading fantasy stories. Eventually, I began creating my own worlds and published the Riddle in Stone series and Sword of Betrayal. I suppose I’m still trying to find a place where I fit in.

Robert's book list on forgotten fantasies

Robert Evert Why did Robert love this book?

Reputed to be one reason why J.R.R. Tolkien, Ursula K. Le Guin, and H.P. Lovecraft began writing fantasy, The Book of Wonder is a collection of short stories by Irish fantasy writer, Lord Dunsany. With gnoles, mail-clad warriors, and dragons, it is in many ways the foundation of what we consider classical fantasy stories. Unfortunately, it doesn’t often get the credit it deserves.

By Lord Dunsany,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Book of Wonder as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.


Book cover of Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor

Laura C. Stevenson Author Of All Men Glad and Wise: A Mystery

From my list on mysteries that make a time and place come alive.

Who am I?

I’m an historian who writes novels, and an avid reader of historical murder mysteries—especially ones whose characters are affected by social, religious, and political change. Lately, I’ve been fascinated by the breakup of rural British estates between 1880 and 1925, when, in a single generation, the amount of British land owned by the aristocracy fell from 66% to perhaps 15%. I thought it might be interesting to set a “country house” mystery on one of the failing estates, with a narrator influenced by the other great change of the period: from horses to automobiles. “Interesting” was an understatement; writing it was eye-opening.  

Laura's book list on mysteries that make a time and place come alive

Laura C. Stevenson Why did Laura love this book?

Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor is the first of Stephanie Barron’s 14 Jane Austen mysteries, based on Austen’s “discovered” diaries about her adventures as a sleuth.  The series’ witty tone is true to Austen’s, and portrayals of Austen’s family are based in fact. In this opening volume, Jane is visiting a friend “of more fashion than means” newly married a middle aged earl—who dies, poisoned, after a celebratory party. His will divides his estate between his countess and an heir known to be too fond of her, making the pair obvious suspects. As Jane works to prove her friend innocent, the descriptions of aristocratic Regency life, dress, manners, and law are superb. 

By Stephanie Barron,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

For everyone who loves Jane Austen...a marvelously entertaining new series that turns the incomparable author into an extraordinary sleuth!

On a visit to the estate of her friend, the young and beautiful Isobel Payne, Countess of Scargrave, Jane bears witness to a tragedy. Isobel's husband—a gentleman of mature years—is felled by a mysterious and agonizing ailment. The Earl's death seems a cruel blow of fate for the newly married Isobel. Yet the bereaved widow soon finds that it's only the beginning of her misfortune...as she receives a sinister missive accusing her and the Earl's nephew of adultery—and murder. Desperately afraid…


Book cover of The Three Widows of Wylder

Diane Scott Lewis Author Of Her Vanquished Land

From my list on courageous women in authentic historical settings.

Who am I?

I’ve always been fascinated by the past, through movies and books. What is it like to live in an age with no cell phones, no internet? People have to work ten times as hard. I eschewed fluffy romances and wanted to get down to the nitty-gritty of a historical era. How they dress, what they eat, the dirt and truth, then throw in obstacles to test my female characters’ strength and self-reliance. As an avid reader, I have no problem with extensive research to get my facts correct. I want to walk in their world and deal with their problems. Then delve deep into the emotions we all experience.

Diane's book list on courageous women in authentic historical settings

Diane Scott Lewis Why did Diane love this book?

This western showcases three strong and determined women of completely different backgrounds. I found something to appreciate about each one. Clara is under suspicion for poisoning her husband and flees west to start a new life. Selfish Mary Rose joins her, to put her past with husbands to rest. Emma finds them on the trail, falls in, but hides a terrible secret. Ms. Howard’s writing is clean and straightforward and always kept me engaged. How can they pool their resources and reach their goals? I liked how they came to trust and protect, no matter their flaws. Ms. Howard is excellent at characterization and this story taught me about female empowerment in difficult times. They thrive without help from men. As a horse lover, I enjoyed Emma’s horse training skills. 

By Julie Howard,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Three Widows of Wylder as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Three women on the run.

After the death of her husband, Clara flees a hanging judge and seeks refuge with her brother in Wylder, Wyoming.

With secrets of her own and good reasons to flee, spoiled and vain Mary Rose joins Clara on the trek to Wyoming. Surely a suitable man exists somewhere.

Emma is a mystery. A crack shot and expert horsewoman, her harrowing past seeps out in a steady drip. She's on the run from something, but what?

After the three women descend on Wylder, a budding romance leads to exposure of their pasts. As disaster looms, will…


Book cover of Mary Tudor "Bloody Mary"

Shirin Yim Bridges Author Of Eat Your Peas, Julius! Even Caesar Must Clean His Plate

From my list on children’s stories introducing history and culture.

Who am I?

I have been a complete history nerd since childhood—since I opened a Christmas present to reveal one of the books I recommend here, People in History. Since then I’ve written 21 children’s books, and published more by other authors as the founder of Goosebottom Books. All these books touch on some aspect of history or culture in one way or the other. There’s always an emphasis or insight into custom, time, or place. Even the adult novels I’m currently working on are historical fiction. I’m still completely enthralled by the many worlds of the past. I even listen to history podcasts when I’m doing the dishes!

Shirin's book list on children’s stories introducing history and culture

Shirin Yim Bridges Why did Shirin love this book?

Back to pure history! At one point, I was the founder and publisher—the Head Goose—of Goosebottom Books. Of all the books we published, this title is my favorite. Gretchen Maurer, the author, did a great job of presenting a very complex and nuanced story in a way that makes it human and understandable to young readers, without side-stepping the facts. The book design and illustration are remarkable and evoke the rich Tudor aesthetic. But what I love most about this book is that it presents the antihero to my childhood hero, Elizabeth I of England, and raises the question: just how fair was history? One of these two sisters became known as Bloody Mary, the other as Good Queen Bess. Did they fully deserve those reputations?

By Gretchen Maurer, Peter Malone (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Mary Tudor "Bloody Mary" as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it. This book is for kids age 9, 10, 11, and 12.

What is this book about?

The first reigning Queen of England, Mary Tudor believed fervently that Catholicism should be the religion of the land, leading her to burn at the stake hundreds of Protestants. Was she just a ruler of her times, or did she deserve the name, Bloody Mary? Gorgeous illustrations and an intelligent, evocative story bring to life a real dastardly dame who, fueled by her faith, created a religious firestorm.


Book cover of Cinder

Mary DeSantis Author Of Grimmfay: The Circus of Fairy Tales and Dreams

From my list on retelling that tangle multiple fairy tales.

Who am I?

I grew up on a steady diet of Disney movies, and while I knew they didn’t stay true to the original tales, that didn’t stop me from loving them. Fast-forward through an MFA in genre fiction from Seton Hill University, and I landed a gig writing study guides for fiction novels, where I put my love of fairy tales to good use. In particular, retellings fascinate me because they bring something new to something old. The books on this list stayed with me because of their deep ties to stories that shaped who I am, and I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

Mary's book list on retelling that tangle multiple fairy tales

Mary DeSantis Why did Mary love this book?

This was one of the first books that introduced me to retellings incorporating multiple fairy tales, and I knew right there that this was a genre I both wanted to read widely and write in.

I was beyond fascinated by the world Meyer created, especially the juxtaposition of fairy tales and a futuristic society.

Cinder herself was a breath of fresh air—a mechanic who was much more than she appeared, and I connected with her in a hungry way, in a way that made me realize that I could be fiercely independent and still want others in my life (even a romantic interest).

I blew through this book in a day, and I’ve reread it to find everything I missed on that first go-through.

By Marissa Meyer,

Why should I read it?

5 authors picked Cinder as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it. This book is for kids age 12, 13, 14, and 15.

What is this book about?

A forbidden romance.
A deadly plague.
Earth's fate hinges on one girl . . .

CINDER, a gifted mechanic in New Beijing, is also a cyborg. She's reviled by her stepmother and blamed for her stepsister's sudden illness. But when her life becomes entwined with the handsome Prince Kai's, she finds herself at the centre of a violent struggle between the desires of an evil queen - and a dangerous temptation.

Cinder is caught between duty and freedom, loyalty and betrayal. Now she must uncover secrets about her mysterious past in order to protect Earth's future.

This is not the…


Book cover of Stepsister

Margaret McNellis Author Of The Red Fletch

From my list on a female protagonist claiming her agency.

Who am I?

Identity, agency, belonging, and transformation…these are the themes which drive me to write. I love historical fiction and historical fantasy because for female characters, the past was rife with oppression, which creates an even greater barrier to self-actualization and personal alchemy. There are still barriers for females in our present world, but setting a story in the past can more clearly call out those barriers and the ways females bust through them. We finally live in a world where historians and storytellers are unearthing the untold tales of the past. No longer are the narratives in the sole control of the victors and oppressors. 

Margaret's book list on a female protagonist claiming her agency

Margaret McNellis Why did Margaret love this book?

This is my favorite book of Donnelly’s, perhaps because I had the distinct pleasure of meeting her upon its release. This book was an inspiration to me as a writer. Not only is Isabelle considered “ugly,” but her spirit is so downtrodden at the beginning of the story because others don’t believe in her abilities. She must find her own agency and her own belief in her abilities to do great things and realize that real beauty shines from within. 

By Jennifer Donnelly,

Why should I read it?

5 authors picked Stepsister as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it. This book is for kids age 12, 13, 14, and 15.

What is this book about?

'In an ancient city by the sea, three sisters - a maiden, a mother, and a crone - are drawing maps by candlelight. Sombre, with piercing grey eyes, they are the three Fates, and every map is a human life . . .'

Stepsister takes up where Cinderella's tale ends. We meet Isabelle, the younger of Cinderella's two stepsisters. Ella is considered beautiful; stepsister Isabelle is not. Isabelle is fearless, brave, and strong-willed. She fences better than any boy, and takes her stallion over jumps that grown men fear to attempt. It doesn't matter, though; these qualities are not valued…


5 book lists we think you will like!

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