10 books like Girls & Boys

By Dennis Kelly,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like Girls & Boys. Shepherd is a community of 7,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Evil Eye

By Madhuri Shekar,

Book cover of Evil Eye

Madhuri Shekar’s groundbreaking psychological thriller helped show new ways that audiobooks could plunge listeners into a story. I’m sure I wasn’t the only author who took note. Evil Eye follows a mother who immigrated to the U.S. from India as she prepares to accept her daughter’s partner into the family. But she is troubled by an old crime. The tale is told almost entirely through phone calls and voice messages. That meticulously constructed delivery heightens the suspense as we discover how trauma can span oceans and overlap generations.

Evil Eye

By Madhuri Shekar,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Evil Eye as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Evil Eye garnered an Audie Award for Original Work in 2020.

Usha is convinced that the Evil Eye, a curse that brings continuous misfortune, was cast upon her daughter, Pallavi, in the womb. What else could have possibly left her driven, career-oriented daughter edging closer and closer to 30 without a prospective husband? Determined to set Pallavi on the right path, Usha arranges date after date with potential suitors - but after yet another setup fails, it seems her efforts are proving fruitless. But in an unexpected turn of events, Pallavi becomes her own matchmaker when she meets - and…


Hardy/Friedland

By Greg Donahue,

Book cover of Hardy/Friedland

Greg Donahue uses a trove of archival audio to dive into how David Hardy, a Pulitzer-Prize-nominated reporter who was instrumental in integrating newsrooms, struck up an unlikely friendship with his most mysterious source, David Friedland—a lawyer, fraudster, and government witness whose pastimes include chess and hand-feeding sharks. After faking his own death in the Bahamas to avoid arrest, Friedland also became one of the FBI’s most-wanted fugitives. The dynamism of these two real-life characters kept drawing me in. As did the revealing, decades-old recordings and the author’s impressive framing of history.

Hardy/Friedland

By Greg Donahue,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Hardy/Friedland as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A lonely chalet at the summit of a snow-capped peak was the last place you would expect to find David Hardy. As an intrepid political reporter for the Daily News, the New Jersey native spent most of his time cornering officials in the halls and backrooms of the state’s government buildings or poring over the endless handwritten notes that covered his cluttered newsroom desk. In fact, the flight to Switzerland was one of the first times that Hardy had ever been on a plane. 

But in March of 1986, a cassette tape landed on Hardy’s desk that changed everything. The…


We Are the Water People

By Troy Onyango,

Book cover of We Are the Water People: A Short Story

We Are the Water People is an eerie tale about how a community – human and supernatural – tries to process an unspeakable calamity on the shores of Lake Victoria. The telling is as deep and mysterious as the murky waters on which the story is set. I quickly became immersed in the poetry of the language and the moody atmosphere filling my headphones. 

We Are the Water People

By Troy Onyango,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked We Are the Water People as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

From critically acclaimed author Troy Onyango comes a dark, suspenseful tale of spirits bearing witness to a crime that rocks an island community, based on the Luo legend of the water people. 

When fishermen on Nam Lolwe (commonly known as Lake Victoria) return with the body of a young boy found inside the sack, a close-knit island is thrown into mourning, and they all suspect foul play in the death of the child. But who could have committed such a terrible crime, and why? To discover the truth, the islanders must rely on the water spirits beneath the lake’s surface…


Death by Unknown Event

By Danielle Elliot,

Book cover of Death by Unknown Event

Unspooled as an episodic series, Danielle Elliot traces the true story of one woman’s long-running nightmare in Vancouver. Police received hundreds of complaints about a stalker and then repeatedly arrived at shocking scenes. But authorities began to doubt the victim’s claims—until she was found dead. I’ve long admired the hard-boiled writing of Ross Macdonald and Margaret Millar, and I don’t think it is only the Canadian setting that makes Death by Unknown Event remind me of their work, but rather the psychological intrigue. Except the twisting plot of these 12 episodes is no work of fiction—sometimes life just can be that strange.

Death by Unknown Event

By Danielle Elliot,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Death by Unknown Event as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

For seven years, Vancouver nurse Cindy James reported more than 100 separate incidents of harassment, ranging from threatening phone calls to home invasions to ritualistic assaults, including strangulations and stabbings. Canada’s Royal Mounted Police spent over a million dollars investigating her claims and found zero evidence of foul play, leading them to suspect she was making it all up. Then, in 1989, Cindy was found dead, bound and naked, half a mile from where her car was parked in a shopping mall. What happened to Cindy James remains one of the most bizarre and perplexing true crime stories in recent…


The Magic Cottage

By James Herbert,

Book cover of The Magic Cottage

Many might class this as a horror novel. I don’t. For me it’s a beautiful, spellbinding story of a cottage in the country that has feelings, both good and bad. How many of us have walked into a house and felt its vibe? That moment you know something’s not right or conversely, is perfect. A feeling Mike is not sure about but his wife is. Combining magic with mystery, fear with fantasy, it is one of those stories that defies a scientific, logical explanation and one of the few books I have read several times, each time coming up with a different theory of how it could even be possible. Sometimes we simply have to suspend belief. 

The Magic Cottage

By James Herbert,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Magic Cottage as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Step inside The Magic Cottage, another chilling classic from the Master of Horror James Herbert.

A cottage was found in the heart of the forest. It was charming, maybe a little run-down, but so peaceful - a magical haven for creativity and love. But the cottage had an alternative side - the bad magic. What happened there was horrendous beyond belief . . .


Pierre

By Maurice Sendak,

Book cover of Pierre: A Cautionary Tale in Five Chapters and a Prologue

All of Maurice Sendak’s protagonists can be accused of making mischief, and feeling the pain afterward. How can you not sympathize with Max in Where the Wild Things Are or admire the sass of Really Rosie? But Pierre takes the cake for his obstinate indifference to the world. A cautionary tale for any child who just doesn’t care.

(Fun fact: One of my oldest friends in the world, Michael Perilstein, played the Lion in the off-Broadway production of Really Rosie in which Maurice Sendak’s Pierre was set to music by the great singer/songwriter Carole King.)

Pierre

By Maurice Sendak,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Pierre as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A story
with a moral air
about Pierre,
who learned
to care.


City Lights

By Keith Waterhouse,

Book cover of City Lights: A Street Life

Waterhouse was famous as a journalist, dramatist, and novelist. But this memoir of growing up in Leeds from the 1930s-50s brings the place and time completely alive. He didn’t have a privileged upbringing, by any means, and Waterhouse captures the day-to-day of poor areas and estates, and well as the magic of the city centre. The novel Billy Liar brought him fame, and while the location was unnamed, it was the Leeds he’d known, right down to the funeral home where he worked after leaving school. Waterhouse innately understood Leeds and its people, and they jump off the page – even if he leaves at the end (something Billy Liar could never bring himself to do). Read this and you’ll carry a magnificent picture of the city in your head.

City Lights

By Keith Waterhouse,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked City Lights as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Keith Waterhouse was born in a world that has now vanished - a soot-blackened, tramcar-rattling provincial city. It happened to be Leeds. Waterhouse was a true city-boy, deeply mistrustful of grass and trees. In early childhood, he would roam the covered markets, the carillon-chiming arcades. As a youth he came to know the cinemas and the theatres. Then, as a junior reporter, he trod the tiled corridors of civic power. Moving "down south", his first impression of London was the sign in Piccadilly Circus; picked out in electric light bulbs, it was a heart-warming replica of the Bovril sign in…


Big Maze Book

By Kirsten Robson,

Book cover of Big Maze Book

You can always rely on a children’s book published by Usborne, the Big Maze Book by Kirsten Robson is no exception. It offers 50 different mazes to solve, each charmingly illustrated. The mazes themselves are nice and varied, incorporating different settings, different subject matter, and slightly different visual treatments, which all helps to keep solvers interested. As a whole, this book would probably appeal more to younger children who still enjoy picture books. That being said, the mazes do get progressively harder through the book, so there is something there for the slightly older ones too.

Big Maze Book

By Kirsten Robson,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Big Maze Book as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Wind your way through over 50 mazes to find: lost friends, escape danger, discover and complete extra puzzles throughout this book.

Book Details: Format: Activity Book Publication Date: 1/1/2013 Pages: 96 Reading Level: Age 6 and Up


The Couple Upstairs

By Shalini Boland,

Book cover of The Couple Upstairs

Shalini Boland is one of the authors who got me hooked on psychological thrillers and when she releases a new book, it’s an automatic buy for me. The Couple Upstairs is set in Bournemouth (on the south coast) and features Nina and Zac who move into a new apartment. They quickly befriend their neighbours and soon all sorts of things start to go wrong. There’s a wonderfully claustrophobic feel to this book, plenty of twists and turns and a shocker twist at the end.

The Couple Upstairs

By Shalini Boland,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Couple Upstairs as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

I should never have become friends with the couple upstairs…

The first time I step inside this cosy apartment with its sash windows, just minutes from the sea, I think it would be the perfect place for me and my partner Zac to start again. A chance to leave our troubled past behind.

Chris and Vanessa, the couple upstairs, are so welcoming: smiles, flowers, a home-baked cake. It’s strange how he does all the talking, and she seems so shy, but I’m just thrilled to have new friends nearby.

But everything starts to go wrong… my business begins to crumble,…


Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men

By Lundy Bancroft,

Book cover of Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men

One in every four women and one in seven men experience partner abuse during their lifetimes. In this gem, renowned expert Lundy Bancroft uncovers the myths surrounding this epidemic. He offers victims and their loved ones a deep understanding of the dynamics of an abusive relationship. The book contains tools to help readers dissolve the erroneous thought and behavior patterns that keep them stuck in these harmful relationships and strategies to end them safely. But most importantly, Bancroft reminds them that the abuse is not their fault–that responsibility for the abuse falls squarely on the abuser. Full of insights and helpful resources, this gem is a must-read for anyone who is or suspects they or someone they love is being abused by a partner.

Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men

By Lundy Bancroft,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In this groundbreaking bestseller, Lundy Bancroft—a counselor who specializes in working with abusive men—uses his knowledge about how abusers think to help women recognize when they are being controlled or devalued, and to find ways to get free of an abusive relationship.

He says he loves you. So...why does he do that?
 
You’ve asked yourself this question again and again. Now you have the chance to see inside the minds of angry and controlling men—and change your life. In Why Does He Do That? you will learn about:
 
• The early warning signs of abuse
• The nature of abusive…


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