10 books like First Feelings

By Stanley I. Greenspan, Nancy Thorndike Greenspan,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like First Feelings. Shepherd is a community of 7,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Oneness and Separateness

By Louise Kaplan,

Book cover of Oneness and Separateness: From Infant to Individual

Vividly and poetically, Dr. Kaplan describes the emotional development of infants, including the choreography of each stage, through ‘holding on and letting go,’ and ’no-saying’ in the Separation / Individuation stage, to a psychological rebirth by the end of the toddler period. The writer carefully delineates the struggles of each baby toward this rebirth as a person who can handle the contradictions of his or her own feelings and those of the parents.

Oneness and Separateness

By Louise Kaplan,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Oneness and Separateness as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Provides insight into the process by which an infant is separated from oneness with its mother, revealing the impact of this separation on human behavior throughout life.


Rethinking the Brain

By Rima Shore,

Book cover of Rethinking the Brain: New Insights into Early Development

By three years of age, toddler brains are two and half times as active as those of adults and they stay that way for a decade. New brain imaging techniques reveal how powerful adult-child positive interactions are for enhancing brain development from birth. With large print, charming infant and toddler photos, and easy-to-read charts, this book should galvanize parents and program personnel to support care providers’ frequent, sensitive, and enriching social interactions from birth onward to enhance and optimize early brain development.

Rethinking the Brain

By Rima Shore,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Rethinking the Brain as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Book by Shore, Rima


Childhood and Society

By Erik H. Erikson,

Book cover of Childhood and Society

Erikson’s classic theoretical rubric clearly describes the positive and negative poles of social development across the life span. For the earliest years, these poles are: Trust vs. Mistrust; Autonomy vs. Shame and Doubt, and Initiative vs. Guilt. Freudian psychosexual theories of development and cross-cultural practices are also discussed.

Childhood and Society

By Erik H. Erikson,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Childhood and Society as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The original and vastly influential ideas of Erik H. Erikson underlie much of our understanding of human development. His insights into the interdependence of the individuals' growth and historical change, his now-famous concepts of identity, growth, and the life cycle, have changed the way we perceive ourselves and society. Widely read and cited, his works have won numerous awards including the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award.

Combining the insights of clinical psychoanalysis with a new approach to cultural anthropology, Childhood and Society deals with the relationships between childhood training and cultural accomplishment, analyzing the infantile and the mature,…


Ghosts from the Nursery

By Robin Karr-Morse, Meredith S Wiley,

Book cover of Ghosts from the Nursery: Tracing the Roots of Violence

Building on the brilliant work of Dr, Selma Fraiberg, who published Ghosts in the Nursery, detailing the consequences for impaired mother-infant relationships when the mother has had traumas in her past and then is “unable” to hear her own baby’s cries and need for nurturance, these authors go further. They provide specific details of how, during the first three years of life, insecure attachments, violence, abuse, terror, neglect, and prenatal ingestion of drugs, lead to impaired brain development, emotional disturbances, and later violent behaviors.

Ghosts from the Nursery

By Robin Karr-Morse, Meredith S Wiley,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Ghosts from the Nursery as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This new, revised edition incorporates significant advances in neurobiological research over the past decade, and includes a new introduction by Dr. Vincent J. Felitti, a leading researcher in the field. When Ghosts from the Nursery: Tracing the Roots of Violence was published in 1997, it was lauded for providing scientific evidence that violence can originate in the womb and become entrenched in a child’s brain by preschool. The authors’ groundbreaking conclusions became even more relevant following the wave of school shootings across the nation including the tragedy at Columbine High School and the shocking subsequent shootings culminating most recently in…


The Magic Years

By Selma H. Fraiberg,

Book cover of The Magic Years: Understanding and Handling the Problems of Early Childhood

The best book I know to understand the emotions of toddlers and how to help regulate those emotions.  Fraiberg is brilliant at taking complicated psychoanalytic and attachment knowledge and putting it into a readable and accessible form to help everyone from clinicians to parents.

The Magic Years

By Selma H. Fraiberg,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Magic Years as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Synopsis coming soon.......


Touchpoints-Birth to Three

By T. Berry Brazelton, Joshua D. Sparrow,

Book cover of Touchpoints-Birth to Three

T. Berry Brazelton has been recognized as an expert on parenting and child development. I used to eagerly wait to read his newspaper column that offered concise advice on child care. In this book, Brazelton covers the milestones of typical development and he discusses common concerns of this age range. Although this book focuses on emotional and behavioral development, his background in pediatrics allows him to write about physical development as well. You will learn, in detail, what to expect of young children up to age three in this comprehensive book.

Touchpoints-Birth to Three

By T. Berry Brazelton, Joshua D. Sparrow,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Touchpoints-Birth to Three as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

All over the U.S. and in over twenty countries around the world, Touchpoints has become required reading for anxious parents of babies and small children. T. Berry Brazelton's great empathy for the universal concerns of parenthood, and honesty about the complex feelings it engenders, as well as his uncanny insight into the predictable leaps and regressions of early childhood, have comforted and supported families since its publication in 1992. In this completely revised edition Dr. Brazelton introduces new information on physical, emotional, and behavioural development. He also addresses the new stresses on families and fears of children, with a fresh…


Children's Minds

By Margaret Donaldson,

Book cover of Children's Minds

I read Children’s Minds during the school summer holidays in 1979 and vividly remember sitting in the sunshine in Edinburgh’s Meadows, in floods of tears over Margaret Donaldson’s call to arms in her closing pages. Children’s Minds is a wonderful introduction to the science of child development (indeed, it profoundly affected the course of that science, particularly in terms of the development of thought and language). It’s wise, perceptive and a great read.  

Children's Minds

By Margaret Donaldson,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Children's Minds as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Margaret Donaldson's seminal work on child development, first published in 1978, has become a classic inquiry into the nature of human thought.

In this concise and brilliantly readable book, Margaret Donaldson shows that context is key when it comes to the development of language and thought, and how the right support can ensure children are skilled in these areas before they even start school. She revisits earlier theories of child development, notably those of Jean Piaget, to expose flaws in the accepted wisdom on child psychology and to suggest a range of new strategies to help children combat difficulties.

As…


The Neurobehavioral and Social-Emotional Development of Infants and Children

By Ed Tronick,

Book cover of The Neurobehavioral and Social-Emotional Development of Infants and Children

This book helps clinicians and parents to understand the need for mothers or primary attachment figures to repair the missteps and misunderstandings from moment to moment to foster emotional security. Every mother and baby have moments of misunderstanding, the sooner the mother can repair this rift through empathy and taking responsibility for the misstep, the more seen and heard and secure the baby will feel.

The Neurobehavioral and Social-Emotional Development of Infants and Children

By Ed Tronick,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Neurobehavioral and Social-Emotional Development of Infants and Children as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Over the course of his esteemed career, he has received funding for hundreds of key studies in the US and abroad on normal and abnormal infant and child development-including his Mutual Regulation Model and Still-Face Paradigm, which revolutionized our understanding of infants' emotional capacities and coping-all of which led to critical contributions in the field. Much of his work serves as the benchmark for how mental health clinicians think about biopsychosocial states of consciousness, the process of meaning making, and how and why we engage with others in the world.

Now, for the first time, Tronick has gathered together his…


How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes

By Melinda Wenner Moyer,

Book cover of How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes: Science-Based Strategies for Better Parenting--From Tots to Teens

Everyone wants to raise honest, generous, and kind kids, right?. And the science of parenting has a lot to say about the best ways to raise children who will care about others. Moyer, as a science journalist who focuses on parenting, draws from all of that research and boils down the best evidence-based strategies for raising compassionate, and anti-biased, kids.

How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes

By Melinda Wenner Moyer,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

As featured in The Guardian, How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes is a clear, actionable, sometimes humorous (but always science-based) guide for parents on how to shape their kids into honest, kind, generous, confident, independent, and resilient people . . . who just might save the world one day.

As an award-winning science journalist, Melinda Wenner Moyer was regularly asked to investigate and address all kinds of parenting questions: how to potty train, when and whether to get vaccines, and how to help kids sleep through the night. But as Melinda's children grew, she found that one huge area…


Twins

By Varian Johnson, Shannon Wright (illustrator),

Book cover of Twins: A Graphic Novel

This is a touching story of two sisters who are changing and, in some ways, growing apart as they figure out who they are. Their rivalry as they both run for class president is realistic, and while it brings out some of the worst aspects of themselves and tears them apart, it also ultimately helps bring them back together but now with a better understanding of appreciation of each other. This story is layered, and the characters are so well developed. Even when things get difficult, these girls keep fighting to win but also to be themselves. 

Twins

By Varian Johnson, Shannon Wright (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

3 authors picked Twins as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A heartfelt and delightful middle-grade graphic novel,
from the award-winning author Varian Johnson and rising cartoonist
Shannon Wright.
Maureen and Francine Carter are twins and best
friends. They participate in the same clubs, enjoy the same foods and are partners
on all their school projects.

But just before the girls start sixth grade, Francine becomes
Fran - a girl who wants to join the chorus, run
for class president and dress in fashionable outfits that set her
apart from Maureen. A girl who seems happy to share only two
classes with her sister!

Maureen and Francine are growing apart and…


5 book lists we think you will like!

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