The best marathon books

2 authors have picked their favorite books about marathons and why they recommend each book.

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Fauja Singh Keeps Going

By Simran Jeet Singh, Baljinder Kaur (illustrator),

Book cover of Fauja Singh Keeps Going: The True Story of the Oldest Person to Ever Run a Marathon

One of the things I love most about this book is the foreword, which was written by Fauja himself – Fauja, the oldest person ever to run a marathon. Fauja was unable to walk until he was five years old and after he walked, he was still very weak. People were always teasing him and telling him he couldn’t do things. There’s a wonderful refrain that runs through the book: “But Fauja did not listen and Fauja did not stop.” At 89, he completed his first marathon. He ran marathons from London to New York to Toronto. The book ends with the Toronto Marathon, in which Fauja set a new world record as the oldest person to run a marathon.

Fauja Singh Keeps Going

By Simran Jeet Singh, Baljinder Kaur (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Fauja Singh Keeps Going as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Every step forward is a victory.

Fauja Singh was born determined. He was also born with legs that wouldn't allow him to play cricket with his friends or carry him to school miles from his village in Punjab. But that didn't stop him. Working on his family's farm, Fauja grew stronger to meet his own full potential.

He never stopped striving. At the age of 81, after a lifetime of making his body, mind, and heart stronger, Fauja decided to run his first marathon. He went on to break records all around the world and became the first person over…


Who am I?

I’m a multi-award-winning picture book author of many types of books, from The Pumpkin Runner to Badger’s Perfect Garden. I’ve always been a reader more than an athlete, but throughout my life, I’ve enjoyed running - running down a dusty Kansas backroad, running to the pasture to call in the cows, running to the stream to climb a cottonwood. When I reached my sixties, I finally decided it was time to run a half-marathon. Partway through the race, I broke my foot! But I persevered. When I crossed the finish line, I felt a little like Joshua Summerhayes in The Pumpkin Runner.


I wrote...

The Pumpkin Runner

By Marsha Diane Arnold, Brad Sneed (illustrator),

Book cover of The Pumpkin Runner

What is my book about?

The Pumpkin Runner is the story of a man who ran for the joy of it. It is based on the real-life adventures of a 61-year-old Australian farmer who, amidst ridicule, entered an ultra-marathon from Sydney to Melbourne. 

The story is a combination of fact and fiction told in the style of a tall tale. Inspired by Cliff Young, the story is fictionalized with the likable character, Joshua Summerhayes. Both had a generous, humble spirit and knew how to persevere. The author gave Joshua a dog to run along with him – spunky Yellow Dog. Everyone believed it was pumpkins that gave Joshua the energy to run, but readers learn that it was much more than that.

Her Fearless Run

By Kim Chaffee, Ellen Rooney (illustrator),

Book cover of Her Fearless Run: Kathrine Switzer's Historic Boston Marathon

Running was magic to Kathrine Switzer. But she grew up in a time when most people thought women were too fragile to run a race, especially a 26.2-mile marathon. The illustrations are vibrant and the text well-written, with a “Pat, Pat, Pat” refrain which expands as Kathrine runs faster and faster. The story revolves around how Kathrine entered the Boston Marathon in 1967 when it was a race for men only. She was almost stopped during the race by an angry Race Director, who also believed women should not run a marathon. Kathrine persevered and finished! Since 2008, more than 10,000 women have officially entered to run the Boston Marathon. 

Her Fearless Run

By Kim Chaffee, Ellen Rooney (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Her Fearless Run as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Kathrine Switzer changed the world of running. This narrative biography follows Kathrine from running laps as a girl in her backyard to becoming the first woman to run the Boston Marathon with official race numbers in 1967. Her inspirational true story is for anyone willing to challenge the rules.

The compelling collage art adds to the kinetic action of the story. With tension and heart, this biography has the influential power to get readers into running. An excellent choice for sports fans, New Englanders, young dreamers, and competitive girls and boys alike.


Who am I?

I’m a multi-award-winning picture book author of many types of books, from The Pumpkin Runner to Badger’s Perfect Garden. I’ve always been a reader more than an athlete, but throughout my life, I’ve enjoyed running - running down a dusty Kansas backroad, running to the pasture to call in the cows, running to the stream to climb a cottonwood. When I reached my sixties, I finally decided it was time to run a half-marathon. Partway through the race, I broke my foot! But I persevered. When I crossed the finish line, I felt a little like Joshua Summerhayes in The Pumpkin Runner.


I wrote...

The Pumpkin Runner

By Marsha Diane Arnold, Brad Sneed (illustrator),

Book cover of The Pumpkin Runner

What is my book about?

The Pumpkin Runner is the story of a man who ran for the joy of it. It is based on the real-life adventures of a 61-year-old Australian farmer who, amidst ridicule, entered an ultra-marathon from Sydney to Melbourne. 

The story is a combination of fact and fiction told in the style of a tall tale. Inspired by Cliff Young, the story is fictionalized with the likable character, Joshua Summerhayes. Both had a generous, humble spirit and knew how to persevere. The author gave Joshua a dog to run along with him – spunky Yellow Dog. Everyone believed it was pumpkins that gave Joshua the energy to run, but readers learn that it was much more than that.

Marathon Woman

By Kathrine Switzer,

Book cover of Marathon Woman: Running the Race to Revolutionize Women's Sports

For much of the 20th century, women were banned from taking part in some of running’s biggest races, because of misogynistic beliefs about supposed female fragility. A few women were brave enough to challenge this sexist idea by competing in the same arena as men. By 1967, some women had managed to sneak in to run the Boston Marathon, then all-male, but Kathrine Switzer was the first to officially receive a race number by registering with only her initials. Yet her run wasn’t without drama, as Switzer explains firsthand in her book. A race official noticed Switzer running and attempted to force her off the course. Press photographers captured the whole confrontation. When the resulting photos ran in newspapers, it pushed forward the movement for women’s equality in sport.

Marathon Woman

By Kathrine Switzer,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Marathon Woman as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Katherine Switzer ran the Boston Marathon in 1967 where she was attacked by one of the event's directors who wanted to eject her from the all-male race. She fought off the director and finished the race. From the childhood events that inspired her to winning the New York City Marathon in 1974, this liberally illustrated book details the struggles and achievements of a pioneering women in sports.


Who am I?

I get it, to most people running isn’t fun, but its simplicity can be deceptive. To some, running (especially when done in nature) can be a spiritual act. To others, it (along with its cousin jogging) should’ve been included in the Geneva Conventions. Me? I’ve been running since the third grade and watching running for even longer. Growing up, the Olympics were required viewing and an interest in running naturally flowed from it. Fortunately, you don’t have to be a runner to enjoy the great many books out there about runners and their impact on sports, culture, and world events. 


I wrote...

Kicks: The Great American Story of Sneakers

By Nicholas Smith,

Book cover of Kicks: The Great American Story of Sneakers

What is my book about?

When the athletic shoe graduated from the beaches and croquet courts of the wealthy elite to streetwear ubiquity, its journey through the heart of American life was just getting started. In this rollicking narrative, Nicholas K. Smith carries us through the long twentieth century as sneakers became the totem of subcultures from California skateboarders to New York rappers, the cause of gang violence and riots, the heart of a global economic controversy, the lynchpin in a quest to turn big sports into big business, and the muse of high fashion.

Studded with larger-than-life mavericks and unexpected visionaries—from genius rubber inventor, Charles Goodyear, to road-warrior huckster Chuck Taylor, to the feuding brothers who founded Adidas and Puma, to the track coach who changed the sport by pouring rubber in his wife’s waffle iron—Kicks introduces us to the sneaker’s surprisingly influential, enduring, and evolving legacy.

Book cover of What I Talk about When I Talk about Running: A Memoir

What really fascinates me about Haruki Murakami is not his body of work per se, but the process through which he rose from anonymity and became a world-renowned author. Until he was 29, he’d never imagined he had the talent to write a novel. Before his rise to fame, novelists were known to live a wild and intemperate existence, drinking lots of alcohol into the wee hours and getting started on their manuscript past deadline. Murakami, however, broke this stereotype as someone who wakes up early, works out every day, and has run multiple full marathons. I have no doubt it was the power of his habits that made him a world-famous author. He even says his motto is to turn himself into “a creature of habits.”

What I Talk about When I Talk about Running

By Haruki Murakami,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked What I Talk about When I Talk about Running as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

'Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional'

A compelling mediation on the power of running and a fascinating insight into the life of this internationally bestselling writer. A perfect reading companion for runners.

In 1982, having sold his jazz bar to devote himself to writing, Murakami began running to keep fit. A year later, he'd completed a solo course from Athens to Marathon, and now, after dozens of such races, he reflects upon the influence the sport has had on his life and on his writing.

Equal parts travelogue, training log and reminiscence, this revealing memoir covers his four-month preparation for…


Who am I?

When I became a minimalist, I found that having less made my household chores so much easier. Before then, I thought I was a loser who lets dirty dishes and laundry pile up. But when my environment changed, what I had believed was my personality also shifted. Once my apartment was tidy, it became a habit to do the dishes right away and vacuum the floor before going out, and my life became consistently enjoyable. But other habits were harder nuts to crack, like quitting drinking or exercising regularly. In Hello, Habits I write about my journey of acquiring these habits through a process of trial and error.


I wrote...

Hello, Habits: A Minimalist's Guide to a Better Life

By Fumio Sasaki,

Book cover of Hello, Habits: A Minimalist's Guide to a Better Life

What is my book about?

Fumio Sasaki changed his life when he became a minimalist. But before minimalism could really stick, he had to make it a habit. All of us live our lives based on the habits we’ve formed, from when we get up in the morning to what we eat and drink to how likely we are to actually make it to the gym. In Hello, Habits, Sasaki explains how we can acquire the new habits that we want―and get rid of the ones that don’t do us any good.

Drawing on leading theories and tips about the science of habit formation from cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and sociology, along with examples from popular culture and tried-and-tested techniques from his own life, he unravels common misperceptions about "willpower" and "talent," and offers a step-by-step guide to success.

Book cover of British Marathon Running Legends of the 1980s

Britain used to be a hotbed of marathon talent that ruled the world over 26.2 miles decades before Lottery funding. This is a collection of 21 interviews of men and women who left their mark on the sport often by force of will alone. For those of us who grew up watching these people – and I was one - this is the how and why they did it which at the time was the bit that was never really in the spotlight. So it squares the circle for me. And for those of you who came later – welcome to Old School…

British Marathon Running Legends of the 1980s

By Gabrielle Collison,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked British Marathon Running Legends of the 1980s as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

After the running boom of the 1980s, British marathon running standards gradually started to decline. This was despite the continued advancements in scientific backup, training methods, equipment, full-time professionalism and sponsorship. As a consequence, in the late 1990s, Gabrielle Collison decided to research the factors as to why this was happening and conducted interviews with some of the top British marathon runners from the previous era. Interviewees include London Marathon winners: Hugh Jones, Mike Gratton, Veronique Marot and Joyce Smith; Olympic bronze medallist, Charlie Spedding; and several other "Big City" marathon winners. The stories about their lifestyles and training make…


Who am I?

I think that we’re all a Work In Progress whatever our relative levels of success so I’m drawn to people who share that belief, are way out there and are still working on their own stuff. Especially if they’ve managed to do so without becoming a righteous arse in the process. ‘Cos I want reasons to be reminded how incredible it can be to use as much of what we’ve been given and be ALIVE in every sense of the word. I want to keep learning and growing and getting stronger and faster and more bombproof and compassionate and connected as I moved through my fifth decade and beyond. These books really resonate with me – I hope they will for you too.


I wrote...

So You Want to Run an Ultra: How to Prepare for Ultimate Endurance

By Andy Mouncey,

Book cover of So You Want to Run an Ultra: How to Prepare for Ultimate Endurance

What is my book about?

So you want to run an Ultramarathon. It all looks a very long way, doesn't it? It can't be good for you, it can't be fun and surely you have to be some kind of super-athlete to be able to run that far?

This book shows that it is a very long way, that it can be good for you, and that you most certainly don't have to be super-human to finish one. It also goes further by inspiring you to get started and by guiding you each step of the way. So, whether you're just curious to know more about this fast-growing global sport or searching for the right answers to your own ultra-running breakthrough, this book will prove as valuable as your favourite running shoes.

Marathon Mouse

By Amy Dixon, Sam Denlinger (illustrator),

Book cover of Marathon Mouse

Marathon Mouse is a fun story for our littlest runners. Most of the mice living under the bridge between Brooklyn and Staten Island didn’t like the commotion of Marathon Day. But Preston did. Preston braved the crowds and big shoes to run the Marathon himself. And near the finish line, his family, who had told him races weren’t for mice, were there cheering him on.

Marathon Mouse is the only one of my book recommendations about an animal marathon runner. But, as with the books here about people, Preston, the Marathon Mouse, has perseverance and determination and feels joy when he’s running.

Marathon Mouse

By Amy Dixon, Sam Denlinger (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Marathon Mouse as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The mice of New York City dread the day of the New York City Marathon more than any other-the crowds, the large shoes, the noise. All of them, that is, except for Preston. He and his family live underneath the starting line on the Verrazano Bridge and every year Preston has dreamed of joining all the other runners in the marathon. This year, Preston is determined to make his dream come true, even though his family tells him that mice are not fit to run marathons. He trains hard leading up to the big day and when the race starts,…


Who am I?

I’m a multi-award-winning picture book author of many types of books, from The Pumpkin Runner to Badger’s Perfect Garden. I’ve always been a reader more than an athlete, but throughout my life, I’ve enjoyed running - running down a dusty Kansas backroad, running to the pasture to call in the cows, running to the stream to climb a cottonwood. When I reached my sixties, I finally decided it was time to run a half-marathon. Partway through the race, I broke my foot! But I persevered. When I crossed the finish line, I felt a little like Joshua Summerhayes in The Pumpkin Runner.


I wrote...

The Pumpkin Runner

By Marsha Diane Arnold, Brad Sneed (illustrator),

Book cover of The Pumpkin Runner

What is my book about?

The Pumpkin Runner is the story of a man who ran for the joy of it. It is based on the real-life adventures of a 61-year-old Australian farmer who, amidst ridicule, entered an ultra-marathon from Sydney to Melbourne. 

The story is a combination of fact and fiction told in the style of a tall tale. Inspired by Cliff Young, the story is fictionalized with the likable character, Joshua Summerhayes. Both had a generous, humble spirit and knew how to persevere. The author gave Joshua a dog to run along with him – spunky Yellow Dog. Everyone believed it was pumpkins that gave Joshua the energy to run, but readers learn that it was much more than that.

Elements of Effort

By John Jerome,

Book cover of Elements of Effort: Reflections on the Art and Science of Running

An absolute denominator of life is resistance. Nietzsche had it right: adversity helps so long as it doesn’t do us in, and we make the biggest changes in our life when life pushes back. That applies to longevity too; the kites that stay longest in the air are pinned there by resistance. John Jerome gets this. This isn’t a book about longevity, it’s a book about running – slight but wise, with a kind of shopcraft-as-soulcraft turn of mind, if you think of your own body as the machine in the shop. Really, the book is a defense of stretching, in every sense of the word. You have to make periodic jaunts to “edge city,” where you eat the beans of just-manageable difficulty.

Takeaway sentence: “Heroism is endurance for one moment longer.”

Elements of Effort

By John Jerome,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Elements of Effort as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

All runners, from beginners to Olympians, will delight in this luminous compendium of wisdom wrought from many years of running. Applying his clear vision and wry wit to a smorgasbord of running-related topics, including stretching, dancing, bugs, falling, spaghetti, sweat, and the food police, John Jerome shares his contagious passion for the most basic of sports. Stripping the art of running down to its barest elements, he takes readers and runners with him on a joyous journey -- a run that revels in a profound affection and respect for the single sport that is as pure and simple as it…


Who am I?

Writing the Olga book was a privilege in several senses. I got to hang out for five years with a remarkable human who kicked my butt (in the nicest possible way) and pulled me out of a midlife funk with the example of her indomitable spirit. Just as significantly, I got to delve deeply into the question of What makes some people almost … bulletproof? To what degree is healthy aging, well … a choice? This is really all a writer can ask for: to stumble on a subject that will never exhaust itself, that will just continue to open new angles. One way or another, I keep writing about Olga, and I suspect I always will.


I wrote...

What Makes Olga Run?: The Mystery of the 90-Something Track Star and What She Can Teach Us about Living Longer, Happier Lives

By Bruce Grierson,

Book cover of What Makes Olga Run?: The Mystery of the 90-Something Track Star and What She Can Teach Us about Living Longer, Happier Lives

What is my book about?

Olga Kotelko is not your average ninety-four-year-old. She not only looks and acts like a much younger woman, but she also holds over twenty-three world records in track and field.

Convinced that this remarkable woman could help unlock many of the mysteries of aging, Grierson set out to uncover what it is that's driving Olga. He considers every piece of the puzzle, from her diet and sleep habits to how she scores on various personality traits, from what she does in her spare time to her family history. What emerges is not only a tremendously uplifting personal story but a look at the extent to which our health and longevity are determined by the DNA we inherit at birth, and the extent to which we can shape that inheritance. It examines the sum of our genes, opportunities, and choices, and the factors that forge the course of any life, especially during our golden years.

Book cover of The Silence of Great Distance

Murphy writes about the early years of women’s distance running as women discover their desire and ability to run long, and push for acceptance to participate. It traces the experience of the first competitive female long-distance runners who laid the groundwork for the next generation of girls and women runners to begin to experience the benefits.

The Silence of Great Distance

By Frank Murphy,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Silence of Great Distance as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The Silence of Great Distance is the story of the developing world of women's athletics, focused on long-distance runnning. With significant chapters on Doris Brown Heritage, the women of the Soviet Union, and Mary Decker Slaney, the primary narrative is carried by Stephanie Herbst, a nine-time all-American who competed for the University of Wisconsin between 1984 and 1988.


Who am I?

I have been a runner for 50 years and a coach for 30 years. From 2001-2016 I was the coach of Team USA Minnesota Distance Training Center. During that time I coached 24 U.S. National Champions, including an Olympian & 2 USATF Running Circuit Champions, at 1500 meters, 3000 meters, and 10,000 meters on the track; the mile, 10k, 15k, 10 miles, half-marathon, 20k, 25k, and marathon on the road; 4k, 6k, 8k and 10k in cross country.  Athletes I coached qualified for 30 U.S. national teams competing in IAAF World Championships in cross country, indoor track, outdoor track, and road, and achieved 73 top-three finishes in U.S. Championships. 


I wrote...

The River Road: Becoming a Runner in 1972

By Dennis Barker,

Book cover of The River Road: Becoming a Runner in 1972

What is my book about?

The River Road is an evocative novel about becoming a runner in 1972. Filled with compelling stories of runners, running, history, the 1972 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Trials and the Munich Olympics, it brings to life an era in which the U.S. competed for gold in nearly every distance running event. As many of the sport’s icons dominate their events in Eugene and prepare for Munich, fifteen-year-old Lenny prepares for his first season of varsity cross country. Inspired by Jim Ryun, Frank Shorter and Steve Prefontaine, Lenny also learns that Olympic distance runners have come from Minnesota and trained on the same River Road on which he runs. A world of running lore that he never knew existed is opened to him and helps him begin to explore and realize his own ability to run.

The Courage to Start

By John The Penguin Bingham,

Book cover of The Courage to Start: A Guide to Running for Your Life

John “The Penguin” Bingham’s words of inspiration were exactly what I needed when I began to run as an “adult-onset athlete” (his words.) His books are funny and inspirational, informative, and well-written. This is by far my favorite of his many books. Those early months were tough but some days, courage is what it still takes to keep myself out there on the trails and roads.

The Courage to Start

By John The Penguin Bingham,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Courage to Start as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

“The miracle isn't that I finished. The miracle is that I had the courage to start.” Take your first step toward fitness and a happier, healthier life.

Has the idea of running crossed your mind, but you haven't acted on it because you don't think you have the body of a runner? Have you thought about running but quit before you started because you knew that you would be breathless at the end of your driveway? Well, put aside those fears because you can do it. John Bingham, author of the popular Runner's World column “The Penguin Chronicles,” transformed himself…


Who am I?

I'm a best-selling author featured in the Wall Street Journal, mental health advocate, certified meditation-leader, wife, and dog-mom. And I run. Every runner has heard, "I never run unless I'm being chased." Right. But runners don't run because we have to. We run because we can or, more often, because we must. It's a powerful mental health tool. I also write books: the award-winning running and mental health memoir, Depression Hates a Moving TargetYou Should Be Writing, and, available for preorder, Make Every Move a Meditation. I live in central Ohio with my husband and biggest fan, Ed, and our yellow Labrador Retriever, Scarlet.


I wrote...

Depression Hates a Moving Target: How Running with My Dog Brought Me Back from the Brink (Running Can Be the Best Therapy for Depression)

By Nita Sweeney,

Book cover of Depression Hates a Moving Target: How Running with My Dog Brought Me Back from the Brink (Running Can Be the Best Therapy for Depression)

What is my book about?

Can running save your life? This memoir explains how running saved mine.

Nearing my 49th birthday, I was chronically depressed, overweight, grief-stricken, and couch-bound. Then, I saw a high school friend’s social media post: “Call me crazy, but this running is getting to be fun.” Running? Fun? I watched for months until desperation caused me to leash up our yellow Labrador retriever, walk to a secluded area of our neighborhood, and jog for sixty seconds. Two years later, at 51, I ran my first marathon. But the emotional transformation outshines any physical progress. I went from a woman contemplating suicide to one who wanted to thrive. In running, I found the piece missing from my wellness toolkit. It’s never too late to chase your dreams!

Magic

By William Goldman,

Book cover of Magic

The best for last!

You may not recognize the name William Goldman but I guarantee loved at least one of his stories. An amazing storyteller, novelist, and screenwriter: Butch Cassidy and Sundance Kid, Marathon Man, Misery (he adapted Steve King), Chaplin, The Ghost, and The Darkness, and… The Princess Bride. He’s a man who moves between genres with ease and expertise.

His book Magic tops them all. A depressed magician/ventriloquist heads to a lake house vacation. Murder, mystery, and thrills ensue all told in a shocking style that is truly original. I can’t say more without spoiling it. It’s a short novel, a fast read and it will leave an impression on you for weeks to come. After your mind is blown by Magic, look him up, you’ll be impressed!

Magic

By William Goldman,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Magic as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

“One of those can’t-put-it-down-until-the-last-page-is-turned monsters that has readers all over the country missing sleep.”—Minneapolis Tribune
 
Corky is a brilliant entertainer with a bright future ahead of him. He has good looks, many women, and enormous talent. He also had a secret and a certainty: a secret that must be hidden from his public at all costs; and a certainty that the dark forces of magic were out to destroy him.

“Fascinating . . . This dazzling psychological thriller cannot be put down! . . . The most imaginative and enjoyable novel I've read since Marathon Man. . . .  [A]…


Who am I?

As an adrenaline junky—years of kitesurfing, skydiving, bungee jumping, Zero Gravity training—I have a passion for thrills and adventure, coupled with the love for my soulmate, Virginia, since we were kids, I live what I write and write what I live. Of course, I filter it all through my vivid imagination to raise the stakes and pull you in. When I look for a great book, it’s tough to get my blood flowing, to get me excited, but these books are the nearest thing to the thrill of freefalling and having your first chute fail to open (been there, done that. Thank, God for the reserve chute!). These books are truly unique, putting you on the edge of your seat and leaving you wanting more.


I wrote...

The 13th Hour: Chaos

By Richard Doetsch,

Book cover of The 13th Hour: Chaos

What is my book about?

A Mesmerizing Tale Told in Reverse. (Yep, You Start at The Last Chapter and Go Backwards)

“Ingenious The 13th Hour: Chaos, is a jigsaw puzzle in book form. It’s a love story, a political potboiler, and a thriller that upends expectations with every turn of the page. It carried me from heartbreaking opening to the razor edge of its ending in one sitting.” - James Rollins, #1 New York Times bestseller of The Last Odyssey

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