The best books about human migration

2 authors have picked their favorite books about human migration and why they recommend each book.

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The Promised Land

By Nicholas Lemann,

Book cover of The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America

The Promised Land is written in an engaging, eloquent style that makes it an excellent introduction to the history of the Great Black Migration. A noted journalist, Lemann interviewed dozens of migrants and their descendants to create a richly textured story of their experiences. Layered onto this story is description and analysis of the political contexts for the migration, including the civil rights movement and the Great Society programs. He follows a group of Black Americans from the Mississippi Delta to Chicago and, in some cases, back. He shows how the migration affected not just the migrants themselves, but America as a whole, for it shifted race relations from a regional to a national problem. Chicagoans like me will enjoy its wealth of local detail.

The Promised Land

By Nicholas Lemann,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked The Promised Land as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Who am I?

I'm a lifelong reader and wanted to study literature from an early age. I grew up in Indianapolis, one of the cities reshaped by the Great Black Migration. I went to graduate school at the University of Chicago and found myself once again in the urban Midwest. My research for Conjuring the Folk led me to discover a trove of short stories by George Wylie Henderson, a Black writer from Alabama who migrated to Harlem. I edited the stories and published them as Harlem Calling: The Collected Stories of George Wylie Henderson. I'm a contributor to African American Review, the Journal of Modern Literature, and the Encyclopedia of the Great Black Migration


I wrote...

Conjuring the Folk: Forms of Modernity in African America

By David G. Nicholls,

Book cover of Conjuring the Folk: Forms of Modernity in African America

What is my book about?

Conjuring the Folk addresses the relation between metropolitan artistic culture and its popular referents during the Great Black Migration. From Jean Toomer's conclusion that "the Negro of the folk-song has all but passed away" to Zora Neale Hurston's discovery of "a rich field for folk-lore" in a Florida lumber camp, writers of the period made competing claims about the vitality of the African American "folk”—claims that form a discordant conversation on the question of modernity in African America. The book interprets key literary works by Toomer, Hurston, Claude McKay, George Wylie Henderson, and Richard Wright. A provocative rereading of Black cultural politics in the mid-twentieth century, Conjuring the Folk offers an analytical framework for understanding representations of migration, modernization, and the concept of the "folk.

The Warmth of Other Suns

By Isabel Wilkerson,

Book cover of The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

Wilkerson embeds us with some of the millions of Black men and women who fled the Jim Crow South between 1915 and 1970, describing communities abandoned and hopes realized or disappointed. Robert Foster left his Louisiana town for Southern California, where he navigated new forms of racism to establish himself as a surgeon and prominent social figure. Ida Mae Gladney took her family from Mississippi to Chicago, where lodging, segregation, and “mind-numbing labor” scarcely improved on that of the South. But it was in Chicago that Ida Mae was first able to vote. Through the lives of people like these, Wilkerson paints a sweeping history of twentieth-century America that tells us as much about a country and an era as Tolstoy did in War and Peace.

The Warmth of Other Suns

By Isabel Wilkerson,

Why should I read it?

7 authors picked The Warmth of Other Suns as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Who am I?

I’m a historian whose love of the subject was first nourished by my mother. She treated historical events as a source of good stories, discussed historical figures as if talking about people we knew personally, and introduced me to historical fictions that immersed me in vanished worlds. I still read historical fiction, to which I’ve added mountains of history proper. The nonfiction histories I most love insist that the past matters, and they make visible how seemingly abstract events touched the lives of ordinary people.


I wrote...

The Last Revolutionaries: The Conspiracy Trial of Gracchus Babeuf and the Equals

By Laura Mason,

Book cover of The Last Revolutionaries: The Conspiracy Trial of Gracchus Babeuf and the Equals

What is my book about?

This is a history of a poor but determined man whose world was changed by the French Revolution of 1789. Gracchus Babeuf took on the roles of activist, bureaucrat, journalist, and conspirator as his ideas about justice, poverty, and democratic liberty radicalized. When he became convinced that the door was closing on revolutionary promises of civil rights and material well-being, he initiated a conspiracy against the government to restore popular democracy and abolish private property. The conspiracy was exposed but, during the trial that followed, Babeuf and his allies cast a searching light on the government’s retreat from social and political equality. Babeuf’s novel aspirations would be remembered for generations, prompting Karl Marx to name him the first modern communist.

White Flight

By Kevin M. Kruse,

Book cover of White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism

The rise of the right was in many ways a southern phenomenon as the Old South transformed into the Sun Belt. White Flight explores how white supremacy and fears over desegregation propelled the conservative movement in Atlanta and on the national stage. As federal initiatives spelled the end for segregation in the 1950s and 1960s, southern whites managed to preserve racial discrimination through more subtle avenues. Whites fled Atlanta’s urban core for its suburbs where they reformed the world of white supremacy, giving birth to new causes such as tax revolts, tuition vouchers, and the privatization of public services.

White Flight

By Kevin M. Kruse,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked White Flight as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

During the civil rights era, Atlanta thought of itself as "The City Too Busy to Hate," a rare place in the South where the races lived and thrived together. Over the course of the 1960s and 1970s, however, so many whites fled the city for the suburbs that Atlanta earned a new nickname: "The City Too Busy Moving to Hate." In this reappraisal of racial politics in modern America, Kevin Kruse explains the causes and consequences of "white flight" in Atlanta and elsewhere. Seeking to understand segregationists on their own terms, White Flight moves past simple stereotypes to explore the…

Who am I?

I’m a professor of modern US and global history at Hartwick College in upstate New York. I have been reading and researching the history of conservative and right-wing movements in the United States and the wider world for almost two decades. My first book, Revolutionaries for the Right: Anticommunist Internationalism and Paramilitary Warfare in the Cold War, was published by University of North Carolina Press in 2018. My articles, essays, and reviews have appeared in Jacobin, Diplomatic History, Terrorism and Political Science, H-War, and H-Diplo. I’m currently at work on two projects: a history of the transatlantic white power movement and a film documentary about the short-lived white supremacist nation of Rhodesia and its contemporary legacies.


I wrote...

Revolutionaries for the Right: Anticommunist Internationalism and Paramilitary Warfare in the Cold War

By Kyle Burke,

Book cover of Revolutionaries for the Right: Anticommunist Internationalism and Paramilitary Warfare in the Cold War

What is my book about?

My book, Revolutionaries for the Right, chronicles the rise and fall of what I call the anticommunist international—a global right-wing movement that sought paramilitary action against communism worldwide. Seeking revolution against leftist governments and movements, the anticommunist international ran propaganda campaigns, smuggled weapons, and organized mercenary missions in Rhodesia, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Angola, Afghanistan, Cambodia, and many other countries. Utilizing previously untapped archival sources from four continents, Revolutionaries for the Right shows that the circulation of violence—both actual and imagined—between the United States and these overseas battlegrounds in the late Cold War helped radicalize right-wing paramilitary groups at home while also generating new forms of privatized warfare abroad. Those consequences reverberate today.

Ecological Imperialism

By Alfred W. Crosby,

Book cover of Ecological Imperialism

This is one of the classic books in environmental history. It expands upon his earlier work, The Columbian Exchange, and shows how European imperialism succeeded sooner and more fully in those parts of the world that were ecologically suited to the crops and weeds, domestic and wild animals, and disease-causing microbes that Europeans brought with them. Plants, animals, microbes, and human-operated as an unconscious team, helping one another get established in the temperate zones of the Americas, Australia, and New Zealand—to the great misfortune of the Indigenous populations of these lands.

Ecological Imperialism

By Alfred W. Crosby,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Ecological Imperialism as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

People of European descent form the bulk of the population in most of the temperate zones of the world - North America, Australia and New Zealand. The military successes of European imperialism are easy to explain; in many cases they were a matter of firearms against spears. But as Alfred W. Crosby maintains in this highly original and fascinating book, the Europeans' displacement and replacement of the native peoples in the temperate zones was more a matter of biology than of military conquest. European organisms had certain decisive advantages over their New World and Australian counterparts. The spread of European…

Who am I?

I’ve been reading and writing environmental history since I was trapped indoors on a rainy afternoon nearly 40 years ago and by chance pulled Alfred Crosby’s The Columbian Exchange off a bookshelf. I read it in one gulp (it’s a short book and the rain lingered) and I’ve never been the same since. I regard the environmental as the most fundamental sort of history, because it places humankind and our history in its full context. I love to learn about how humans and their environments affect one another and to read histories that treat both together—because in reality they have always been, and always will be, intertwined.  


I wrote...

Something New Under the Sun: An Environmental History of the Twentieth-Century World

By John Robert McNeill,

Book cover of Something New Under the Sun: An Environmental History of the Twentieth-Century World

What is my book about?

This is the kind of environmental history that describes changes to the world’s forests, fields, soils, lakes, rivers, water quality, air quality, wildlife, and cities—and tries to explain why those changes happened. It argues that the middle of the twentieth century marked a turning point in global environmental history because the scale, scope, and pace of environmental change accelerated markedly. The key reasons for that acceleration lay in the world’s energy system with fossil fuels at its center, in a sudden surge in population growth, in a relentlessly competitive international system, and in the resistance of economic management to ecological thinking. Even though the Times of London listed it among the best science books ever written, it’s a history book.  

Across Atlantic Ice

By Dennis J. Stanford, Bruce A. Bradley,

Book cover of Across Atlantic Ice: The Origin of America's Clovis Culture

Dennis Stanford one of the Clovis first police, changed his mind about the Clovis first hypothesis after carrying out excavations along the mid-Atlantic coast of North America. This book provides an informed view of pre-Clovis sites, paleo climates, and the possibilities for human migrations between the eastern and western hemispheres via the Atlantic. Evidence for human migrations between the eastern hemisphere known today as Southern France and the Western Hemisphere known today as the Americas during the Pleistocene are supported through rigorous research and possible linkages between stone tools known as Solutrean technologies found in both areas.

Across Atlantic Ice

By Dennis J. Stanford, Bruce A. Bradley,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Across Atlantic Ice as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Who were the first humans to inhabit North America? According to the now familiar story, mammal hunters entered the continent some 12,000 years ago via a land bridge that spanned the Bering Sea. Distinctive stone tools belonging to the Clovis culture established the presence of these early New World people. But are the Clovis tools Asian in origin? Drawing from original archaeological analysis, paleoclimatic research, and genetic studies, noted archaeologists Dennis J. Stanford and Bruce A. Bradley challenge the old narrative and, in the process, counter traditional - and often subjective - approaches to archaeological testing for historical relatedness. The…

Who am I?

As an Indigenous person, I have a lived experience of the negative impacts of an erased history on all people. Students I teach are shocked to hear that Indigenous people have been in the Americas for over 60,000 years. The violence against archaeologists publishing on older than Clovis sites in the Americas is intense; that got me asking why? I sought the truth about the evidence for Pleistocene age archaeology sites in the Americas. Global human migrations attest to the fact that humans have been migrating great distances for over 2 million years. Reclaiming and rewriting Indigenous history is one path of many, leading to healing and reconciliation. 


I wrote...

The Indigenous Paleolithic of the Western Hemisphere

By Paulette F.C. Steeves,

Book cover of The Indigenous Paleolithic of the Western Hemisphere

What is my book about?

In this first book on Paleolithic archaeology of the Americas written from an Indigenous perspective, Steeves, a (Cree-Metis) archaeologist, mines evidence from archaeology sites and Paleolithic environments, landscapes, and mammalian and human migrations to make the case that people have been in the Western Hemisphere not only just prior to Clovis sites (10,200 years ago) but for more than 60,000 years, and likely more than 100,000 years.

Steeves discusses the political history of American anthropology to focus on why pre-Clovis sites have been dismissed by the field for nearly a century. She explores supporting evidence from genetics and linguistic anthropology regarding First Peoples and time frames of early migrations. Additionally, she highlights the work and struggles faced by a small yet vibrant group of American and European archaeologists.

The Apache Diaspora

By Paul Conrad,

Book cover of The Apache Diaspora: Four Centuries of Displacement and Survival

When we think of slavery in American History, we mostly think of African Americans enslaved by white settlers. Paul Conrad tells a different story. Focusing on the Apache and through the often poignant stories of particular Apache women and men over the course of four centuries, he details their experience as shifting webs of alliance led to their enslavement by the Spanish and the Mexicans on the North American mainland and Cuba, and imprisoned and held in unfreedom by the United States through the 1880s, and yet still holding onto their identity as a distinct people with a distinct culture.

The Apache Diaspora

By Paul Conrad,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Apache Diaspora as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Across four centuries, Apache (Nde) peoples in the North American West confronted enslavement and forced migration schemes intended to exploit, subjugate, or eliminate them. While many Indigenous groups in the Americas lived through similar histories, Apaches were especially affected owing to their mobility, resistance, and proximity to multiple imperial powers. Spanish, Comanche, Mexican, and American efforts scattered thousands of Apaches across the continent and into the Caribbean and deeply impacted Apache groups that managed to remain in the Southwest.
Based on archival research in Spain, Mexico, and the United States, as well Apache oral histories, The Apache Diaspora brings to…


Who am I?

At some point I decided that if I was going to teach US history, I better have a good sense of what the place looked like. So I drove across the country—and then back again—and then again, and then once more, each time at a different latitude. I drove through North Dakota and South Dakota, Montana and Idaho, Nebraska and Kansas, Arkansas and Oklahoma, Louisiana and Texas, up and down California, Oregon and Washington, and on and on. I got addicted to seeing the landscape in all its amazing variety and vastness, and seeing the landscape made the histories come alive. 


I wrote...

Making a Modern U.S. West: The Contested Terrain of a Region and Its Borders, 1898-1940

By Sarah Deutsch,

Book cover of Making a Modern U.S. West: The Contested Terrain of a Region and Its Borders, 1898-1940

What is my book about?

The West played a far larger role in national politics and constructing a “modern” U.S. than is usually thought. It helped shape not only racial formations and key industries, but definitions of modernity itself. Oil workers, migrant laborers, women’s rights activists, corporate moguls, revolutionaries, and others duke it out in these pages. 

Their legacy was complicated—a reliance on precarious low-wage labor and at the same time large-scale public enterprise and a powerful state. Those who struggled, from across the globe and the nation, also kept alive an American dream and American belonging, a notion of democracy that was broader than political participation. Contests over who would participate in that democracy, who would define “American”—would be carried into the 21st century.

Saltwater Slavery

By Stephanie E. Smallwood,

Book cover of Saltwater Slavery: A Middle Passage from Africa to American Diaspora

Relying primarily on Royal African Company records, Smallwood reconstructs the forced migration and enslavement of approximately 300,000 African men, women, and children who were transported in English ships from the Gold Coast (modern-day Ghana) to the Americas between 1675 and 1725. She traces their dehumanizing journey from captivity in European forts on the West African coast through commodification at sea to sale in slave markets in the Caribbean and North America.

Through careful analysis of quantitative data, Smallwood tracks the processes of commodification that underwrote the transatlantic slave trade while simultaneously foregrounding the human experience of captivity and migration. This book offers a model example of innovative historical writing.

Saltwater Slavery

By Stephanie E. Smallwood,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Saltwater Slavery as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This bold, innovative book promises to radically alter our understanding of the Atlantic slave trade, and the depths of its horrors. Stephanie E. Smallwood offers a penetrating look at the process of enslavement from its African origins through the Middle Passage and into the American slave market.

Smallwood's story is animated by deep research and gives us a startlingly graphic experience of the slave trade from the vantage point of the slaves themselves. Ultimately, Saltwater Slavery details how African people were transformed into Atlantic commodities in the process. She begins her narrative on the shores of seventeenth-century Africa, tracing how…


Who am I?

I'm a historian of early modern Britain and the British Atlantic world who realized years ago that Britain, like the United States, hadn't yet fully acknowledged or come to terms with its involvement in the transatlantic slave trade and African slavery and its global afterlives. Although awareness of Britain's role in the African slave trade and Atlantic slavery has begun to feature more prominently in national consciousness, particularly due to the work of The Movement for Black Lives and calls for an overdue reckoning with the legacies of colonialism, slavery, and racial injustice, much work remains to be done. Using the archival record--as flawed as it may be--to piece together Britain's imperial past, confront calculated historical silences, and track the full extent of British participation in the enslavement of millions of Africans will help to ensure that the histories and voices of enslaved people and their descendants aren't distorted or forgotten by current and future generations.


I wrote...

A Dark Inheritance: Blood, Race, and Sex in Colonial Jamaica

By Brooke Newman,

Book cover of A Dark Inheritance: Blood, Race, and Sex in Colonial Jamaica

What is my book about?

A Dark Inheritance explores how colonial authorities and planters in Jamaica, Britain’s most valuable Atlantic colony by the mid-eighteenth century, used blood lineage to justify hereditary racial slavery and limited rights for free people of African descent. Based on extensive archival work, it highlights the creative ways notions of ancestry and blood enabled white colonists in Jamaica to assert and defend their privileged racial, political, and socio-economic status while simultaneously defining and redefining who was a slave and who was not, and by extension who was “white” and who was not.

At the same time, it shows how enslaved and free people of African and multiple ancestries articulated a counterargument for freedom and equality with white subjects grounded in allegiance to the British Crown and their own understandings of blood lineage.

A Great and Noble Scheme

By John Mack Faragher,

Book cover of A Great and Noble Scheme: The Tragic Story of the Expulsion of the French Acadians from Their American Homeland

Faragher’s book created quite a stir when it came out in 2005, especially among Acadians. For here was an author who had no Acadian roots who saw the tragedy of the Acadian Deportation from the perspective of their ancestors. The history recounted in the book provides rich details on how and why in 1755 troops from New England sought to carry out their "great and noble scheme" of expelling 18,000 French-speaking Acadians ("the neutral French") from Nova Scotia. The removals would last eight years with thousands of Acadians forcibly relocated, a large number died, families often separated, and others going into hiding in forests. Faragher tells the story with a strong, highly readable narrative.

A Great and Noble Scheme

By John Mack Faragher,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Great and Noble Scheme as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In 1755, New England troops embarked on a "great and noble scheme" to expel 18,000 French-speaking Acadians ("the neutral French") from Nova Scotia, killing thousands, separating innumerable families, and driving many into forests where they waged a desperate guerrilla resistance. The right of neutrality; to live in peace from the imperial wars waged between France and England; had been one of the founding values of Acadia; its settlers traded and intermarried freely with native Mikmaq Indians and English Protestants alike. But the Acadians' refusal to swear unconditional allegiance to the British Crown in the mid-eighteenth century gave New Englanders, who…


Who am I?

I have no French or Acadian ancestors—as far as I know—yet the majority of my 21 books (history and fiction) explore different aspects of French colonial or Acadian history. Childhood visits to historic sites like the Port-Royal Habitation, Grand-Pré, Louisbourg and Fort Anne must have planted the seeds for the historian and writer I would become. Then again, working for years as an historian at the Fortress of Louisbourg definitely helped. France made me a chevalier of its Ordre des Palmes académiques for my body of work.


I wrote...

The Hat

By A.J.B. Johnston,

Book cover of The Hat

What is my book about?

The Hat presents the story of the 1755 Acadian Deportation from Grand-Pré, Nova Scotia, in a fresh, 21st-century way. Readers are not told—until the Afterword— where and when the action is taking place, nor by whom or to whom. Everything that happens is seen through the eyes of two central characters, 14-year-old Marie and 10-year-old Charles. The sister and brother show determination and perseverance as they deal with an incredibly difficult situation. Though based on a tragedy, the story is uplifting and inspiring. In the Afterword, readers discover the historical details behind the story they have just read.

South Side Girls

By Marcia Chatelain,

Book cover of South Side Girls: Growing Up in the Great Migration

Mining contemporaneous news accounts, personal letters and diaries, and dozens of in-depth interviews, scholar Marcia Chatelain explores the impact that the Great Migration had on a generation of young Black Chicago women, who coped with coming of age in the urban North while shouldering the expectations and aspirations of their uprooted parents. Anyone new to Chatelain’s work should also check out her next and equally original book, Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America, a study of the deeply mixed legacy of McDonald’s restaurants in Black neighborhoods that won the 2021 Pulitzer Prize for History.

South Side Girls

By Marcia Chatelain,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked South Side Girls as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In South Side Girls Marcia Chatelain recasts Chicago's Great Migration through the lens of black girls. Focusing on the years between 1910 and 1940, when Chicago's black population quintupled, Chatelain describes how Chicago's black social scientists, urban reformers, journalists and activists formulated a vulnerable image of urban black girlhood that needed protecting. She argues that the construction and meaning of black girlhood shifted in response to major economic, social, and cultural changes and crises, and that it reflected parents' and community leaders' anxieties about urbanization and its meaning for racial progress. Girls shouldered much of the burden of black aspiration,…

Who am I?

For more than thirty years, I worked as journalist covering the biggest news stories of the day—at Newsweek magazine (where I became the publication’s first African-American top editor), then as a news executive at NBC News and CNN. Now, I keep a hand in that world as a judge of several prestigious journalism awards while taking a longer view in my own work as a contributor for CBS Sunday Morning, Washington Post book reviewer, and author of narrative non-fiction books with a focus on key personalities and turning points in Black History.


I wrote...

Smoketown: The Untold Story of the Other Great Black Renaissance

By Mark Whitaker,

Book cover of Smoketown: The Untold Story of the Other Great Black Renaissance

What is my book about?

The grandson of Black Pittsburgh undertakers, veteran journalist Mark Whitaker documents the remarkable impact on mid-20th Century American culture and politics made by the city’s small but vibrant Black community. Pittsburgh produced the most widely read Black newspaper of the era (The Pittsburgh Courier), fielded the two best Negro League teams of the 1930s (the Pittsburgh Crawfords and the Homestead Grays), nurtured scores of groundbreaking jazz musicians (from Billy Strayhorn and Billy Eckstine to Mary Lou Williams, Ray Brown, Art Blakey and Erroll Garner) and served as the canvas for August Wilson, America’ greatest Black playwright.

Described by Kirkus Review as “an expansive, prodigiously researched, and masterfully told history,” Smoketown recounts the stories of the Southern migrant families that produced these pioneers and explores the confluence of social factors that, like Pittsburgh’s three rivers, met to create what Whitaker calls “this glittering saga.”

Book cover of The Graves Are Walking: The Great Famine and the Saga of the Irish People

There’s a minor thread in my novel about the Irish Potato Famine, and this book was a major resource. It was sobering to learn that there was enough food to feed the Irish peasantry, but it was not distributed according to need. (Much of it was exported.) Worse still, it was a cultural moment in which the wealthy found ways to absolve themselves of the poverty of their neighbors. But I was most shocked to learn about the scientific implications. Essentially, the potato variety that failed was a monoculture. And the solution to the blight involved returning to the Andes, with its vast genetic diversity, and finding a resistant strain. 

The Graves Are Walking

By John Kelly,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Graves Are Walking as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

It started in 1845 and lasted six years. Before it was over, more than one million men, women, and children starved to death and another million fled the country. Measured in terms of mortality, the Great Irish Potato Famine was one of the worst disasters in the nineteenth century - it claimed twice as many lives as the American Civil War. A perfect storm of bacterial infection, political greed, and religious intolerance sparked this catastrophe. But even more extraordinary than its scope were its political underpinnings, and "The Graves Are Walking" provides fresh material and analysis on the role that…

Who am I?

I’m a novelist and a teacher of writing. My books are fueled by curiosity above all else. I have no expertise in science, so I stand in wonder at complicated systems that remain mostly hidden to me. My interest in food is similarly recreational. I’m married to a great chef and cookbook author, so I’ve learned a lot by osmosis. But when I think back on the process of writing One Potato, I have to give a lot of credit to my students. They seem to be part of a generation that’s genuinely passionate about eating in healthy, equitable, and sustainable ways. Much of my book was sparked by conversations in the classroom.


I wrote...

One Potato

By Tyler Mcmahon,

Book cover of One Potato

What is my book about?

A satire set within the biotech industry, One Potato features a bumbling but well-intentioned food scientist forced to walk a crooked line between nature and technology. Eddie Morales is quite happy as a lowly R&D man at a Boise-based biotech firm called Tuberware. His aspirations don’t reach far beyond processed foods and a simple life in Idaho. It comes as a shock when the company’s head calls Eddie into the office to discuss a situation in Puerto Malogrado—a tiny but tumultuous country in South America—where lax regulations allow Tuberware to market experimental crops. Eddie—not an expert on GMOs or PR—is dispatched to the Andes to help avert a media circus.  

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