The best books about barristers

2 authors have picked their favorite books about barristers and why they recommend each book.

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Rumpole of the Bailey

By John Clifford Mortimer,

Book cover of Rumpole of the Bailey

I first met Rumpole, the Old Bailey Hack, as he called himself, on the PBS Masterpiece series. John Mortimer’s books about the curmudgeonly old barrister are even more delightful. As a former trial attorney, I love how the collections of short stories in his books give me a peek inside the British legal system—and how they present plenty of puzzles to solve, filled with irascible good wit. 

Rumpole of the Bailey

By John Clifford Mortimer,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Rumpole of the Bailey as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A collection of stories featuring Rumpole of the Bailey, including "Rumpole and the Younger Generation", "Rumpole and the Alternative Society", "Rumpole and the Honourable Member", "Rumpole and the Married Lady, "Rumpole and the Learned Friends" and "Rumpole and the Heavy Brigade".


Who am I?

When I started writing mysteries, beginning with St. Martin’s Malice Award-winning Southern Fried, I wanted to get the medical, investigative, and courtroom details right. What better resource than good first-hand accounts from professionals who do those things every day? I love traditional, play-fair mysteries and the puzzles they present. But I also love writers who get the technical details right while also writing engaging novels I can get lost in. Nothing better than curling up with a good mystery.


I wrote...

Triangle True Crime Stories

By Cathy Pickens,

Book cover of Triangle True Crime Stories

What is my book about?

North Carolina's Triangle region is known for its universities, research facilities, and politics, but even in such a prosperous, diverse, modern environment, crime helps define the edges. These cases cover several decades of murder, fraud and betrayal. Read about the nation's largest prison escape and a couple of North Carolina's poisoners. From a civil rights-era clash of Old South and New and a suspected Cold War spy to new-tech sleuths and tales of diligent as well as discredited investigators, these stories will keep you entertained and aghast at the dark side of daily life. Writer Cathy Pickens brings a mystery writer’s eye to the region’s true crime. 

The Simple Art of Murder

By Raymond Chandler,

Book cover of The Simple Art of Murder

I am a fan of this style of writing. Some may call it pulp fiction. Perhaps, hard-boiled? I suppose it is like comparing bare-knuckle fighting and boxing under the Marquis of Queensbury rules. Chandler's style, and those like him, is down and dirty, and supposed to be realistic. Indeed, in his essay, he writes: "Fiction in any form has always intended to be realistic." He was writing in the context of denigrating the old-fashioned British-style mystery. I do believe he has a point. Anyone who is familiar with his work and style can understand my penchant for liking crime fiction that is realistic. The remainder of my picks reflect this. 

The Simple Art of Murder

By Raymond Chandler,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Simple Art of Murder as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This is a collection of early short stories and an essay which gave the book its name. The latter is fairly short and its main idea is an argument for the virtues of a noir mystery as opposed to a traditional British one. Considering the fact that this comes from a guy who became a classic of the former even before his death and that he picked up some below the average examples of the latter, I agree.

The stories themselves left me out cold for the most part. I can actually describe the plot in practically all of them…


Who am I?

I was a cop for fourteen years and a barrister in the UK for another fourteen years appearing in criminal trials. I've seen and heard enough real cops, lawyers, and criminals to last me a lifetime and more. It left an indelible mark on my own writing and reading preferences. I love true crime but also good crime fiction with realistic characters, settings, and plausible storylines. There's a thread that connects me to most of the authors whose books I have recommended. They're either former lawyers with investigative experience or experienced journalists with experience of a crime beat. Chandler is the exception, but I must say he would've probably fitted right into the police forces.


I wrote...

Operation George: A Gripping True Crime Story of an Audacious Undercover Sting

By Stephen Bentley, Mark Dickens,

Book cover of Operation George: A Gripping True Crime Story of an Audacious Undercover Sting

What is my book about?

Following the horrific murder of Rosemary Nelson, the prominent human rights lawyer, in Northern Ireland, Jim Fulton, a prominent LVF paramilitary, fled to the United States. He was deported with help from the FBI and in collusion with the British police, on his arrival at Heathrow, Fulton ‘walked through an open door,’ a Lewis Carrol-like euphemism for an invitation created by the crack undercover covert police team, only to disappear down the rabbit hole on accepting the invitation. The invitation? Working for an 'organized crime group' who were really all undercover officers recording every conversation with the target, Fulton, for two years.

According to Readers’ Favorite, Operation George ranks up with true crime classics such as Donnie Brasco and The Infiltrator in its pulse-pounding narrative of undercover operations with significant ramifications.

Thirteen

By Steve Cavanagh,

Book cover of Thirteen

"The serial killer isn’t on trial he’s on the jury."

Actor Bobby Solomon is accused of murdering his wife and bodyguard in a frenzied attack. Eddie Flynn, former conman turned lawyer, is brought in to assist the defence team. Eddie’s the full package—resourceful, quick-witted, a masterful cross-examiner, and he can handle himself in a fight. He also believes in Bobby’s innocence. But he’s up against an ingenious, ruthless killer who will stop at nothing to achieve his cause. 

If the central premise—that of a killer infiltrating the jury and undermining the entire justice system—isn’t sufficiently terrifying, then the array of corrupt police officers and self-serving lawyers (on both sides) should tip you over the edge. Happily, Eddie stands head and shoulders above them all.

Thirteen

By Steve Cavanagh,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Thirteen as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

THE SERIAL KILLER ISN'T ON TRIAL.

HE'S ON THE JURY...

****************

'THIRTEEN is my favourite read of the year.' Sarah Pinborough

'Outstanding.' Lee Child

'Smart and original. This is a belter of a book.' Clare Mackintosh

****************

They were Hollywood's hottest power couple. They had the world at their feet. Now one of them is dead and Hollywood star Robert Solomon is charged with the brutal murder of his beautiful wife.

This is the celebrity murder trial of the century and the defence want one man on their team: con artist turned lawyer Eddie Flynn.

All the evidence points to…


Who am I?

Having spent my youth watching dramas Crown Court and L.A. Law on TV and reading Rumpole of the Bailey, it’s not surprising I became a lawyer and then went on to write legal thrillers myself. The courtroom is an inherently theatrical place, where emotions and tensions run high. It’s a place where egos collide, theories are propounded and punctured and the liberty (and sometimes the life) of the accused is at stake. It follows, then, that lawyers operate in a totally even-handed system, where they’ll always achieve a fair and just result and uncover the truth. All the books I’ve recommended challenge this notion in different (but equally brilliant) ways.


I wrote...

The Pinocchio Brief

By Abi Silver,

Book cover of The Pinocchio Brief

What is my book about?

Fifteen-year-old schoolboy, Raymond Maynard, is accused of the brutal murder of his teacher. His appointed lawyers—the guarded veteran, Judith Burton, and the energetic young novice, Constance Lamb—begin a desperate pursuit of the truth, revealing uncomfortable secrets about the teacher and the school. 

But Judith has her own secrets which risk exposure when a new lie-detecting device, nicknamed Pinocchio, is introduced at Ray’s trial. This sophisticated software will watch for tiny movements in his face, to determine whether he is telling the truth—or not. A chilling, compelling courtroom drama that asks timely questions about the way we live our lives.

Rabette Run

By Nick Rippington, Emma Mitchell (editor),

Book cover of Rabette Run

Not only did this novel remind me of Lewis Carroll's works, but it also reminded me of the Beatles' Magical Mystery Tour and other works of theirs in their hallucinogenic-inspired songs and albums. Rippington himself is aware of that in his writing as he references both Alice in Wonderland and the phrase 'magical mystery tour.'

So far, I may have misled you because this book is a real thriller. It travels along at the speed of sound and though the things happening to Emerson Rabette are fantastic, they are so believable at the same time. That's difficult to do as a writer but Mr. Rippington manages it with ease and much panache.

Rabette Run

By Nick Rippington, Emma Mitchell (editor),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Rabette Run as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

What the readers are saying...
★★★★★ The perfect escapist read for our times
‘★★★★★ The sort of book you ‘watch’ while reading... utterly brilliant
★★★★★ If possible, I would have awarded this 10 stars. This book is much more than amazing.
★★★★★ The author, Nick Rippington, himself describes it as "Alice in Wonderland... with guns." Well, he's right and it's not hype.

Graphic designer Emerson Rabette is forced to use the London Underground to get to a meeting with his employers. There's a problem, as he's terrified of the tube. He is no ordinary commuter and this is no ordinary…


Who am I?

I was a cop for fourteen years and a barrister in the UK for another fourteen years appearing in criminal trials. I've seen and heard enough real cops, lawyers, and criminals to last me a lifetime and more. It left an indelible mark on my own writing and reading preferences. I love true crime but also good crime fiction with realistic characters, settings, and plausible storylines. There's a thread that connects me to most of the authors whose books I have recommended. They're either former lawyers with investigative experience or experienced journalists with experience of a crime beat. Chandler is the exception, but I must say he would've probably fitted right into the police forces.


I wrote...

Operation George: A Gripping True Crime Story of an Audacious Undercover Sting

By Stephen Bentley, Mark Dickens,

Book cover of Operation George: A Gripping True Crime Story of an Audacious Undercover Sting

What is my book about?

Following the horrific murder of Rosemary Nelson, the prominent human rights lawyer, in Northern Ireland, Jim Fulton, a prominent LVF paramilitary, fled to the United States. He was deported with help from the FBI and in collusion with the British police, on his arrival at Heathrow, Fulton ‘walked through an open door,’ a Lewis Carrol-like euphemism for an invitation created by the crack undercover covert police team, only to disappear down the rabbit hole on accepting the invitation. The invitation? Working for an 'organized crime group' who were really all undercover officers recording every conversation with the target, Fulton, for two years.

According to Readers’ Favorite, Operation George ranks up with true crime classics such as Donnie Brasco and The Infiltrator in its pulse-pounding narrative of undercover operations with significant ramifications.

Without Prejudice

By Nicola Williams,

Book cover of Without Prejudice

When Armani-loving lawyer, Leanne Mitchell, is asked to defend millionaire Clive Omartian on fraud charges, she believes her career is on an upward trajectory. But her success puts her at odds with the head of her Chambers, who is desperate to be awarded ‘Silk’ and with her instructing solicitor and old friend, as she begins to suspect he knows more about their client than he is letting on. Before she realises, she’s being dragged into dangerous waters.

Oozing authenticity, twisty and turny, the reader shares Lee’s pain, not just the wounds she suffers from courtroom barbs, but in her everyday experience as a young, black, working-class woman barrister in a mainly white, male, privileged world. Despite huge challenges she remains feisty and principled. A real hero for our times.

Without Prejudice

By Nicola Williams,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Without Prejudice as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

'Impressive and unique. As relevant today as it was over two decades go' Bernardine Evaristo, from the Introduction

A gripping, propulsive courtroom thriller following barrister Lee Mitchell as she uncovers the dark secrets of London's obscenely rich

Lee Mitchell is a thirty-year-old barrister from a working-class Caribbean background: in the cut-throat environment of the courtroom, everything is stacked against her.

After she takes on the high-profile case of notorious millionaire playboy Clive Omartian - arrested along with his father and stepbrother for eye-wateringly exorbitant fraud - the line between her personal and professional life becomes dangerously blurred.
Spiralling further into…


Who am I?

Having spent my youth watching dramas Crown Court and L.A. Law on TV and reading Rumpole of the Bailey, it’s not surprising I became a lawyer and then went on to write legal thrillers myself. The courtroom is an inherently theatrical place, where emotions and tensions run high. It’s a place where egos collide, theories are propounded and punctured and the liberty (and sometimes the life) of the accused is at stake. It follows, then, that lawyers operate in a totally even-handed system, where they’ll always achieve a fair and just result and uncover the truth. All the books I’ve recommended challenge this notion in different (but equally brilliant) ways.


I wrote...

The Pinocchio Brief

By Abi Silver,

Book cover of The Pinocchio Brief

What is my book about?

Fifteen-year-old schoolboy, Raymond Maynard, is accused of the brutal murder of his teacher. His appointed lawyers—the guarded veteran, Judith Burton, and the energetic young novice, Constance Lamb—begin a desperate pursuit of the truth, revealing uncomfortable secrets about the teacher and the school. 

But Judith has her own secrets which risk exposure when a new lie-detecting device, nicknamed Pinocchio, is introduced at Ray’s trial. This sophisticated software will watch for tiny movements in his face, to determine whether he is telling the truth—or not. A chilling, compelling courtroom drama that asks timely questions about the way we live our lives.

Murder by Misrule

By Anna Castle,

Book cover of Murder by Misrule: A Francis Bacon Mystery

In Elizabethan England, Christmas revelries were presided over by a Lord of Misrule. During this season of legitimized misconduct, the brilliant Sir Francis Bacon requires surreptitious help in solving the murder of a fellow barrister in hopes of regaining the queen’s favor, from which he’s been ousted. It falls to his protégé, Thomas Clarady, to probe through disguises and earn the trust of a range of women, from the educated to the bawdy, in order to find the answers in time to prevent catastrophe. I love the Tudor period with all its riches, and this first entry in the Francis Bacon Mystery Series feels emotionally and historically credible.

Murder by Misrule

By Anna Castle,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Murder by Misrule as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Brilliant Francis Bacon is at a loss -- and in danger.
Bacon must put down his books and investigate the murder of a fellow barrister at Gray's Inn in order to regain the queen's favor. He recruits his unwanted protégé, Thomas Clarady, to do the tiresome legwork. The son of a wealthy privateer, Tom will gladly do anything to climb the Elizabethan social ladder. The first clues point to a Catholic conspirator, but other motives for murder quickly emerge. Rival barristers contend for the victim's legal honors and wealthy clients. Highly-placed courtiers are implicated as the investigation reaches from Whitehall…


Who am I?

Half a century ago (hard to believe!), as a young newspaper reporter, I began every day at a police station, reading the log and talking to the watch commander. Occasionally, I was able to contact the detectives as well. For me, the way crimes and criminal investigations unfolded, and the personalities of the officers involved, were multi-dimensional and touched with surprising, and often unexpected, moments of humor. In my reading as well as my writing, I seek a balance between authenticity and a sense of the absurd, without which the experience of solving murders—real or fictional—could become emotionally crushing. 


I wrote...

The Case of the Questionable Quadruplet

By Jacqueline Diamond,

Book cover of The Case of the Questionable Quadruplet

What is my book about?

Can a small-town doctor foil a killer and discover the truth about a missing baby? A patient shares a long-held secret with Dr. Eric Darcy—and then someone murders her. After police in his small town shrug off a vital clue, the young, widowed doctor teams with his cranky PI sister-in-law to bring justice. 

Was a fourth baby, a quadruplet, stolen at birth, many years ago? If so, what happened to the baby or, if she grew up, where is she now? “A very clever mystery where emotions and feelings ran deep.” -NightOwlReviews.

Capital Kill

By Marc Rainer,

Book cover of Capital Kill

Capital Kill is a classic example of an author “writing what he knows.” Marc Rainer is a former prosecutor in the courts of Washington D.C. and a former lawyer with the US Air Force's Judge Advocate General (JAG) Corps. He is married to a former Air Force OSI Special Agent.

His protagonist, Jeff Trask, shares the same background. In the book we also get to meet Lynn, an Air Force OSI Special Agent.

This is the first in a series based on Jeff Trask and it is labelled as “crime drama.” It is. But it is also a delightful mix of police procedural and legal courtroom thriller. I loved it!

Capital Kill

By Marc Rainer,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Capital Kill as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A few short blocks from the safety of the museums and monuments on the National Mall, a ruthless killer prowls the streets of Washington, D.C. Federal prosecutor Jeff Trask joins a team of FBI agents and police detectives as they try to solve the series of brutal murders. As the body count rises, the investigation leads to a chilling confrontation with the leader of an international drug smuggling ring, and no one is safe, not even the police.

Written by former Washington prosecutor Marc Rainer, Capital Kill is a swirling thrill ride through the labyrinth of a major federal investigation…


Who am I?

I was a cop for fourteen years and a barrister in the UK for another fourteen years appearing in criminal trials. I've seen and heard enough real cops, lawyers, and criminals to last me a lifetime and more. It left an indelible mark on my own writing and reading preferences. I love true crime but also good crime fiction with realistic characters, settings, and plausible storylines. There's a thread that connects me to most of the authors whose books I have recommended. They're either former lawyers with investigative experience or experienced journalists with experience of a crime beat. Chandler is the exception, but I must say he would've probably fitted right into the police forces.


I wrote...

Operation George: A Gripping True Crime Story of an Audacious Undercover Sting

By Stephen Bentley, Mark Dickens,

Book cover of Operation George: A Gripping True Crime Story of an Audacious Undercover Sting

What is my book about?

Following the horrific murder of Rosemary Nelson, the prominent human rights lawyer, in Northern Ireland, Jim Fulton, a prominent LVF paramilitary, fled to the United States. He was deported with help from the FBI and in collusion with the British police, on his arrival at Heathrow, Fulton ‘walked through an open door,’ a Lewis Carrol-like euphemism for an invitation created by the crack undercover covert police team, only to disappear down the rabbit hole on accepting the invitation. The invitation? Working for an 'organized crime group' who were really all undercover officers recording every conversation with the target, Fulton, for two years.

According to Readers’ Favorite, Operation George ranks up with true crime classics such as Donnie Brasco and The Infiltrator in its pulse-pounding narrative of undercover operations with significant ramifications.

The Law in 60 Seconds

By Christian Weaver,

Book cover of The Law in 60 Seconds: A Pocket Guide to Your Rights

This entertaining quick-fire legal reference book provides instant help for any difficult situation. A pocket-sized book to be carried with you at all times. The book comes alive with examples taken from the author’s own life experience. It is about the basic human rights which belong to all of us and what they mean in our lives.

The Law in 60 Seconds

By Christian Weaver,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Law in 60 Seconds as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

'An indispensable guide to the law and your rights, giving you a lawyer in your pocket for a multitude of legal questions and problems that crop up in everyday life. ... Exceptional' - The Secret Barrister
'Brilliant and generous and very necessary' - Sarah Langford, author of In Your Defense
'A triumph of a book. It should form the basis for a national curriculum in law.' - Joanna Hardy-Susskind

From junior barrister Christian Weaver comes an indispensable guide to your basic legal rights.

We engage with the law every day: when we leave the house, and even when we don't,…


Who am I?

I am a UK registered lawyer specializing in real estate and I’m passionate about my work. I am also a non-fiction legal writer. I don’t just write about what I know. I write about what I do. I don’t primarily write for other lawyers. Instead, I try to make the law accessible to anyone who needs to use it: whether they are a leaseholder facing service charge liabilities or someone responsible for the management of a block of flats. Since the 2017 Grenfell fire disaster, I have been following the evolution of new UK fire safety regulations and their practical effect on leaseholders and everyone involved in the management of a high-rise building. 


I wrote...

Fire Safety Law: A Practical Guide for Leaseholders, Building-Owners and Conveyancers

By V. Charles Ward,

Book cover of Fire Safety Law: A Practical Guide for Leaseholders, Building-Owners and Conveyancers

What is my book about?

A practical guide to new UK fire-safety legislation which has emerged since the 2017 Grenfell tower-block fire in which more than 70 residents lost their lives. And all because of highly flammable aluminum wall cladding which ignited as a result of a fire in the kitchen of one of the flats. Included within those victims are the thousands of leaseholders living in similar high-rise blocks, whose flats became worthless overnight. This book does not only alert residential leaseholders to their rights but also explains the new fire-safety responsibilities with which building managers must now comply. The book includes extensive references to the Fire Safety Order 2005; the Fire Safety Act 2021; the Building Safety Act 2022 and the Fire-Safety (England) Regulations 2022.

You Don't Know Me

By Imran Mahmood,

Book cover of You Don't Know Me

A young man accused of murder stands before the jury in court. Fed up with his barrister’s advice to ‘only tell the jury what they can believe’ he makes his own closing speech. He tells ‘the whole truth’ in his own words. 

In setting out the details of his chaotic life, he aims to provide an innocent explanation for the eight pieces of circumstantial evidence against him. It’s only if the jury can understand what it’s like to be him (echoes here of Atticus Finch’s famous line, "You never really understand a person until you… climb into his skin and walk around in it.") that he will receive a fair trial.

A highly original angle for the modern, courtroom drama, executed to perfection. Clearly (as is only right) there’s a subtly-woven, social commentary agenda too.

You Don't Know Me

By Imran Mahmood,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked You Don't Know Me as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

2013 Christy Award winner!
2013 Carol Award finalist (ACFW)
To everyone who knows her, Annalise Decker is a model wife and mother. She’s a permanent member of the PTA, never misses her kids’ sporting events, and is constantly campaigning for her husband’s mayoral race.

No one knows that Annalise was once Deidre O’Reilly, a troubled young woman whose testimony put a dangerous criminal behind bars. Relocated through the Witness Security Program to the sleepy town of Deep Haven, Deidre got a new identity and a fresh start, which began when she fell in love with local real estate agent Nathan…


Who am I?

Having spent my youth watching dramas Crown Court and L.A. Law on TV and reading Rumpole of the Bailey, it’s not surprising I became a lawyer and then went on to write legal thrillers myself. The courtroom is an inherently theatrical place, where emotions and tensions run high. It’s a place where egos collide, theories are propounded and punctured and the liberty (and sometimes the life) of the accused is at stake. It follows, then, that lawyers operate in a totally even-handed system, where they’ll always achieve a fair and just result and uncover the truth. All the books I’ve recommended challenge this notion in different (but equally brilliant) ways.


I wrote...

The Pinocchio Brief

By Abi Silver,

Book cover of The Pinocchio Brief

What is my book about?

Fifteen-year-old schoolboy, Raymond Maynard, is accused of the brutal murder of his teacher. His appointed lawyers—the guarded veteran, Judith Burton, and the energetic young novice, Constance Lamb—begin a desperate pursuit of the truth, revealing uncomfortable secrets about the teacher and the school. 

But Judith has her own secrets which risk exposure when a new lie-detecting device, nicknamed Pinocchio, is introduced at Ray’s trial. This sophisticated software will watch for tiny movements in his face, to determine whether he is telling the truth—or not. A chilling, compelling courtroom drama that asks timely questions about the way we live our lives.

The Shortest Way to Hades

By Sarah Caudwell,

Book cover of The Shortest Way to Hades

Narrator Professor Hilary Tamar’s habits and character traits invite non-stop laughter; and yet amazingly the three young barrister characters are every bit as funny in an entirely different way. One of the barristers always carries the action; but Hilary is no Dr. Watson gasping at their brilliance; in every book, her perspicacity and specialist knowledge enable the murder motive to be unravelled and the murderer brought to justice.

These books are rich in comic dialogue, often given as indirect speech. Caudwell’s unique spin on technical legal language will have you laughing out loud. 

The storyline is enchanting. Without Hilary’s specialist knowledge of ancient Greek texts, there might well have been many more murders! And yet so cleverly is this charming novel plotted, that we almost feel her esoteric expertise is only what might be expected of any amateur sleuth worthy of the name.  

The Shortest Way to Hades

By Sarah Caudwell,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Shortest Way to Hades as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Everyone in the family had decided that changing the trust arrangement seemed the perfect way to avoid three million in taxes. However, when dreary cousin Deirdre has a mysterious accident after demanding a fee for her signature, the young London barristers handling the trust seek advice from mentor Hilary Tamar.

Julia believes it's murder; whilst Hilary wonders why the raven-haired heir did not die. But with more deadly accidents occurring, it is Hilary who is given the perilous quest of unmasking the killer.


Who am I?

Living on Devon's gorgeous coast, I'm melding my lifelong love of reading Cozy Sleuths with my love of writing and years of living in foreign climes to write Travel Cozies. I also have a Vella Heist serial Found Money starting on Vella soon, and a Cozy Spy series They Call Him Gimlet coming out in the Autumn.


I wrote...

Death in Paris

By Kate Darroch,

Book cover of Death in Paris

What is my book about?

Màiri and her BFF Lianna dump their cheating partners and head for a New Life in Istanbul. But they get stopped dead in Paris. Lianna is locked up in jail, charged with murder. Màiri is being hunted by murderous terrorists. She never dreamt that travelling outside Scotland would be so dangerous...  

Death in Paris won 9 International Book Awards in 2022, including the Firebird Award for Best Book by a Debut Author.

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