The most recommended eschatology books

Who picked these books? Meet our 10 experts.

10 authors created a book list connected to eschatology, and here are their favorite eschatology books.
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Book cover of The Drama of the Book of Revelation

Roland England Author Of Worthy Is the Lamb: The Book of Revelation as a Drama

From my list on Christian on Revelation for a general audience.

Why am I passionate about this?

I'm a huge fan of Revelation which tops my list of favorite books of the Bible. I recently retired after 47 years as a pastor in the United Church of Christ. How many times have I read Revelation and preached on this marvelous book? How many times have I read and heard interpretations, and misinterpretations? The answer, a lot! I finally decided I had to write my own book. I study Revelation like digging in a field for buried treasure. The more digging, the more riches I find! I am a graduate of Eastern Mennonite University where I majored in Bible, and a graduate of Union Presbyterian Seminary, Richmond, VA., with a Master of Divinity.

Roland's book list on Christian on Revelation for a general audience

Roland England Why did Roland love this book?

I love Bowman’s book for its simplicity and its scholarship. Through it, I discovered Revelation tells the gospel story as a drama! Reading his book, I begin to see, as the curtain is raised on each scene, wonderous mysteries are revealed. I eagerly read each page of the book and read and reread every page of Revelation to find more of its treasures. Having been convinced that Revelation is intended to be a carefully composed and complex drama, I adopted a similar format for organizing my own book.  

By John Wick Bowman,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Drama of the Book of Revelation as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This little book presents a new translation in the modern idiom and a commentary on the book of Revelation particularly directed to the laymen. The Revelation is set forth both as a letter and as a drama; with the major part devoted to the dramatic form of the book. The dramatic arrangement of the Biblical text and concise interpretations of it appear on facing page of the book. There are seven acts, each act with seven scenes. In addition, like the dramatic literature of its own day, it has a prologue and an Epilogue. The Prologue contains only two short…


Book cover of The Meaning of the Millennium: Four Views

Jonathan Menn Author Of Biblical Eschatology, Second Edition

From my list on Biblical eschatology that are understandable and not nuts.

Why am I passionate about this?

I am the director of Equipping Church Leaders-East Africa. East African church leaders (and most Christians everywhere) are interested in eschatology (the study of the “last things”). I have been fascinated by this subject for decades, particularly since I attended a church that took eschatology seriously. After a time, however, I realized that something was amiss in that pastor’s understanding of eschatology. That motivated me to study eschatology on my own and begin compiling an extensive library on the subject. While pursuing my M.Div. at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, I wrote two major papers on the subject and now have written the most comprehensive synthesis on biblical eschatology currently available.

Jonathan's book list on Biblical eschatology that are understandable and not nuts

Jonathan Menn Why did Jonathan love this book?

One of the best ways to deal with controversial subjects is the “point-counterpoint” method of having a proponent of each major view state his or her own position and then be critiqued by proponents of other views. The Meaning of the Millennium: Four Views does just that, utilizing the following proponents: George Eldon Ladd, historic premillennialism; Herman Hoyt, dispensational premillennialism; Loraine Boettner, postmillennialism; and Anthony Hoekema, amillennialism. The book is compact enough so as not to be intimidating for the general reader, yet the major points of each view and critique are sufficiently articulated. While this is a good introduction to the subject, Hoyt’s and Boettner’s presentations are, in my opinion, considerably weaker than Ladd’s and Hoekema’s. 

By Robert G. Clouse (editor),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Meaning of the Millennium as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Christ is coming again. Since the first century, Christians have agreed that Christ will return. But since that time there have also been many disagreements. How will Christ return? When will he return? What sort of kingdom will he establish? What is the meaning of the millennium? These questions persist today. Four major views on the millennium have had both a long history and a host of Christian adherents. In this Spectrum Multiview volume Robert G. Clouse brings together proponents of each view: George Eldon Ladd on historic premillenniallism, Herman A. Hoyt on dispensational premillennialism, Loraine Boettner on post-millennialism and…


Book cover of The Book of Revelation (New International Greek Testament Commentary)

Jonathan Menn Author Of Biblical Eschatology, Second Edition

From my list on Biblical eschatology that are understandable and not nuts.

Why am I passionate about this?

I am the director of Equipping Church Leaders-East Africa. East African church leaders (and most Christians everywhere) are interested in eschatology (the study of the “last things”). I have been fascinated by this subject for decades, particularly since I attended a church that took eschatology seriously. After a time, however, I realized that something was amiss in that pastor’s understanding of eschatology. That motivated me to study eschatology on my own and begin compiling an extensive library on the subject. While pursuing my M.Div. at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, I wrote two major papers on the subject and now have written the most comprehensive synthesis on biblical eschatology currently available.

Jonathan's book list on Biblical eschatology that are understandable and not nuts

Jonathan Menn Why did Jonathan love this book?

G. K. Beale, now at Reformed Theological Seminary in Dallas, TX, is probably the premier authority on the book of Revelation. His massive The Book of Revelation (NIGTC) is over 1100 pages long and, I believe, is without question the most scholarly and detailed treatment of Revelation currently available. Anyone who is seriously interested in the book of Revelation needs to interact with this book. Beale’s treatment of Revelation is enhanced by his deep understanding of the Old Testament (he is co-editor, with D. A. Carson, of Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament). In short, serious students of Revelation should get this book. Its depth of detail will be worth it and will lead the reader to see biblical connections not previously imagined. 

By G. K. Beale,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Book of Revelation (New International Greek Testament Commentary) as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This commentary series is established on the presupposition that the theological character of the New Testament documents calls for exegesis that is sensitive to theological themes as well as to the details of the historical, linguistic, and textual context. Such thorough exegetical work lies at the heart of these volumes, which contain detailed verse-by-verse commentary preceded by general comments on each section and subsection of the text.

An important aim of the NIGTC authors is to interact with the wealth of significant New Testament research published in recent articles and monographs. In this connection the authors make their own scholarly…


Book cover of Not Afraid of the Antichrist: Why We Don't Believe in a Pre-Tribulation Rapture

K.J. Soze Author Of Revelation Explained

From my list on to help explain Bible prophecies.

Why am I passionate about this?

Ever since I was very young I had an interest in Bible prophecy. I thought it was fascinating that someone could predict the future and wondered if the prophecies would come true in my lifetime. It all started with an old audio recording from Alexander Scourby reading the Book of Ezekiel. After that I read the Book of Revelation several times but didn't know what the symbolism meant. Decades later, I picked up the interest again and used my work experience of analytical skills to help interpret its meaning. Most people focus on the Antichrist or Mark of the Beast, yet there are more warnings about the False Prophet than any other character.

K.J.'s book list on to help explain Bible prophecies

K.J. Soze Why did K.J. love this book?

Some of the big topics within Bible prophecy are the Great Tribulation Period with the Antichrist at the helm, and whether Bible believers will be raptured before or after this period of distress. The authors tackle this tough question with sound biblical evidence to support their claims.

Unfortunately, their findings go against many popular opinions of the modern Church and there is great debate amongst believers about the Rapture. This is why their book is very important to provide much needed information for those who hold differing views.

By Michael L. Brown, Craig S. Keener,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Not Afraid of the Antichrist as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Despite the popular theology of our day, Christians should not expect to get out of experiencing the tribulation or the end times. Nowhere in the Bible does the Lord promise us this, say Michael Brown and Craig Keener, two leading, acclaimed Bible scholars. In fact, they say, Jesus promises us tribulation in this world.

Yet this is no reason to fear. In this fascinating, accessible, and personal book, Brown and Keener walk you through what the Bible really says about the rapture, the tribulation, and the end times. What they find will leave you full of hope. God's wrath is…


Book cover of Millennium

Marq de Villiers Author Of The Longbow, the Schooner & the Violin: Wood and Human Achievement

From Marq's 3 favorite reads in 2023.

Why am I passionate about this?

Author Journalist Traveler Endlessly curious

Marq's 3 favorite reads in 2023

Marq de Villiers Why did Marq love this book?

The 55th-century-and-counting end-of-times narrative of Millennium is a time-travel story, yes, but it is more than that.

It manages to dodge the gleeful “paradoxes” at the heart of classical travellers-in-time stories while acknowledging the difficulties of interfering in the established timeline.

Bill Smith, the world-weary 20th-century airplane accident investigator, and his connection with Louise Baltimore, a fixer from dozens of millennia in the future, is one of the oddest relationships in fiction, and Varley’s account of the terminal ennui at the twilight of humanity is distressingly plausible.

If humans can only survive by going deep into history to divert “victims” of catastrophic accidents into a new (if bewildered) life in their far future in order to keep a more or less functioning society alive, what does this say about our survival? Pessimistic but riveting. 

By John Varley,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Millennium as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In the skies over Oakland, California, a DC-10 and a 747 are about to collide. But in the far distant future, a time travel team is preparing to snatch the passengers, leaving prefabricated smoking bodies behind for the rescue teams to find. And in Washington D.C., an air disaster investigator named Smith is about to get a phone call that will change his life...and end the world as we know it.


Book cover of The Millennial Maze

Jonathan Menn Author Of Biblical Eschatology, Second Edition

From my list on Biblical eschatology that are understandable and not nuts.

Why am I passionate about this?

I am the director of Equipping Church Leaders-East Africa. East African church leaders (and most Christians everywhere) are interested in eschatology (the study of the “last things”). I have been fascinated by this subject for decades, particularly since I attended a church that took eschatology seriously. After a time, however, I realized that something was amiss in that pastor’s understanding of eschatology. That motivated me to study eschatology on my own and begin compiling an extensive library on the subject. While pursuing my M.Div. at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, I wrote two major papers on the subject and now have written the most comprehensive synthesis on biblical eschatology currently available.

Jonathan's book list on Biblical eschatology that are understandable and not nuts

Jonathan Menn Why did Jonathan love this book?

The issue of eschatology, and the so-called “millennium” in particular, are the subject of multiple, often wacky, interpretations. Stanley Grenz’s The Millennial Maze cuts through the nonsense. His is one of the best comparative analyses by a single author of the major millennial views. He looks at the history of millennial thought and the development of postmillennialism, historic and dispensational premillennialism, and amillennialism, which he characterizes as, respectively, essentially optimistic, pessimistic, and realistic outlooks concerning eschatology. His approach is irenic, and he notes the virtues that each view brings toward our overall view of eschatology. In short, Grenz’s book is a good and balanced introduction to the subject.

By Stanley J. Grenz,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Millennial Maze as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Book cover of Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church

Kyle Meyaard-Schaap Author Of Following Jesus in a Warming World: A Christian Call to Climate Action

From my list on helping Christians navigate the climate crisis.

Why am I passionate about this?

I was never an outdoorsy kid. But I was a church kid. As I grew up and moved into a calling to serve the church in ordained ministry, that calling took an unexpected turn when I visited West Virginian hollers poisoned by nearby mining operations and met the people living with the consequences. Subsequent trips to Hurricane Katrina-ravaged New Orleans, drought-wracked Kenyan hillsides, and to international climate negotiations in Paris all solidified for me the truth that loving my neighbor required loving God’s creation too. I’ve spent the last 10 years speaking, writing, and teaching Christians across the country the same simple truth.

Kyle's book list on helping Christians navigate the climate crisis

Kyle Meyaard-Schaap Why did Kyle love this book?

I used to think that the ultimate Christian hope was in life after death. NT Wright convinced me I was wrong.

The true hope of the gospel, says Wright, is “life after life after death”. In other words, resurrected life in a renewed heaven and renewed earth. This book completely reframed what I believe about the end of God’s story for creation and held out for me a gospel way bigger than the one I had been given before.

Understanding that God has a good future in store for his entire creation and that, even now, he is reconciling all of it back to himself means that we live differently right now. This book remains my theological anchor for my climate advocacy.

By N T Wright,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Surprised by Hope as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In this groundbreaking book—available in paperback for the first time—renowned Bible scholar, Anglican bishop, and bestselling author N. T. Wright argues that Christians have not distorted the Bible’s message about heaven and what happens after we die.

For years, Christians have been asking, "If you died tonight, do you know where you would go?" It turns out that many believers have been giving the wrong answer. It is not heaven.

Wright outlines the present confusion about a Christian’s future hope and shows how it is deeply intertwined with how we live today. Wright asserts that Christianity’s most distinctive idea is…


Book cover of Stories of the Apocalypse

Neil A. Cohen Author Of Exit Zero

From my list on zombie books for start and stop readers.

Why am I passionate about this?

I have been fascinated by the zombie genre since I was a child. No other genre has influenced and inspired me as much. I am also a very critical consumer of zombie content, as I have great respect for the genre. I began writing my own stories to fill in gaps that I felt had not yet been addressed by previous works.  Since the release of my first novel, I have enjoyed meeting with zombie genre fans, writers, crafters, and creators at horror cons, zombie cons, comic cons and have participated in many panels and podcasts. It is a subject that I will never grow tired of discussing. The zombie genre is truly undying. 

Neil's book list on zombie books for start and stop readers

Neil A. Cohen Why did Neil love this book?

Wastelands is an anthology of short stories, all obviously focused on the apocalypse, but not all including zombies. One memorable story was titled When Sysadmins Ruled the Earth by Cory Doctorow, which features the communications between tech geeks who are safely ensconced within blast-resistant data hosting centers when the apocalypse begins. Working in server hosting centers are equipped with their own power sources, air filtering systems, and an abundance of junk food vending machines, the author creates a scenario where truly the geeks shall inherit the earth.

By John Joseph Adams (editor),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Stories of the Apocalypse as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The definitive anthology of the best post-apocalyptic literature of the last two decades. Featuring New York Times bestsellers Stephen King, George R.R. Martin and Orson Scott Card, edited by award-winning anthologist John Joseph Adams.

Prescient tales of Armageddon and its aftermath, by twenty-two of today's finest writers, including:

Paolo Bacigalupi
Neal Barrett, Jr.
Tobias S. Buckell
Cory Doctorow
David Grigg
Dale Bailey
Elizabeth Bear
Richard Kadrey
John Langan
Jerry Oltion
James Van Pelt

Together they reveal what it will mean to survive and remain human after the end of the world...


Book cover of The Door on Half-Bald Hill

Lindsey Lamh Author Of A Voracious Grief

From my list on a lurking horror preying on relatable protagonists.

Why am I passionate about this?

Reading Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and other “scary stories” in high school ignited a hunger for suspense. In writing my own gothic horror novel, I explored the why’s and how’s a bit, and discovered that the thing I love about lurking, terrifying danger in books is that it bares a character’s soul more rapidly, and more believably, than almost any other plot device. When we face a fate worse than death, we confront our deepest motivators and challenge bedrock beliefs. I hope you’ll enjoy the books on this list as much as I do! I feel like their particular uniqueness is hard to find.

Lindsey's book list on a lurking horror preying on relatable protagonists

Lindsey Lamh Why did Lindsey love this book?

In a Celtic-feeling village the reader follows the story of an absolutely ordinary protagonist, Idris. He’s a poet who chooses great peril in order to discover the truth behind a growing despair plaguing the land.

It is the end of times, according to all the oracles. But Idris refuses to accept annihilation’s cold embrace. As the villagers scrape by despite sickness and blighted crops, the bard goes on a search for hope. In the haunted, banshee-infested moor, he discovers the door on half-bald hill.

I really loved this story because it was all my favorite things—a bleak, earthy landscape with a sharp sense of foreboding haunting every page, and in sharp relief, a group of very real persons, each fostering a flame of hope despite overwhelming burdens and gnawing griefs. 

By Helena Sorensen,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Door on Half-Bald Hill as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

When the Bloodmoon rose, death came rushing into the world. Now the water is bitter, blight consumes everything, the Crone haunts the hills, and the Druid of Blackthorn searches desperately for hope. Sorensen's lyrical tale of light overcoming darkess is a matchless work of Celtic-inspired lore.


Book cover of Kissed by Death

Caitlin Denman Author Of She Awakens

From my list on fantasy to pull you out of your reading slum.

Why am I passionate about this?

I’m an ADHD author who struggles finding books that grasp my attention and keep it so I’m often left in a reading slump. I seem to read samples of countless books before I find something that really draws me in and can engross me. I’ve done the footwork, now you can reap the benefits of all my late-night searching. I hope you enjoy the books on my list as much as I did!

Caitlin's book list on fantasy to pull you out of your reading slum

Caitlin Denman Why did Caitlin love this book?

This book came to me when I needed it most. I was having a hard time finding something that called to me and drew me in.

The main character in this story made me want to be her. She was such an amazing badass and so confident in herself even when she had no clue who she was. Pick this us if you’re looking for gods, vampires, end of the world prophecies, and a HEA.

By Holly Roberds,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Kissed by Death as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.