The best Cherokee books

5 authors have picked their favorite books about Cherokee and why they recommend each book.

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Ties That Bind

By Tiya Miles,

Book cover of Ties That Bind: The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom

A beautiful manuscript documenting the overall racial tension between Indigenous, enslaved Africans, and Europeans is superbly described by Dr. Miles in all aspects. The undertones of admiration and challenges between all three racial groups is eloquently pictured in the relationship between Shoeboots, a prominent Cherokee Champion and farmer, and Doll, his companion and enslaved African woman. The three-decade depiction of Shoeboot’s and Doll’s lives together and Doll’s petition to the federal government requesting Shoe Boot’s pension as his widow is beyond historic. Ties that Bind is a true testament to the enslaved Africans tribal experience before, during, and after slavery; it is essential to one’s book collection.  

Ties That Bind

By Tiya Miles,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Ties That Bind as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This beautifully written book, now in its second edition, tells the haunting saga of a quintessentially American family. It is the story of Shoe Boots, a famed Cherokee warrior and successful farmer, and Doll, an African slave he acquired in the late 1790s. Over the next thirty years, Shoe Boots and Doll lived together as master and slave and also as lifelong partners who, with their children and grandchildren, experienced key events in American history including slavery, the Creek War, the founding of the Cherokee Nation and subsequent removal of Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, and the Civil…


Who am I?

My family’s farm was lost due to a dishonest lawyer that my great-grandmother entrusted. Because of that, I have devoted the past 20 years of my career to providing low-cost legal services to aging rural farmers around estate planning and civil rights. As an attorney, I have worked for the US Department of Agriculture and the Office of Civil Rights in Washington DC. I also founded the non-profit organization F.A.R.M.S., which provides services to aging rural farmers such as preventing farm foreclosures, executing wills, and securing purchase contracts. After drafting Systematic Land Theft over the span of several years, I am happy to release this historic synopsis documenting the land theft of Indigenous and Black communities. I have written extensively on the topics of agriculture, environmental, and land injustice in a variety of legal, trade, and other publications.


I wrote...

Systematic Land Theft

By Jillian Hishaw,

Book cover of Systematic Land Theft

What is my book about?

Systematic Land Theft is a well-documented outline of U.S. history regarding Black and Indigenous land theft. Land Theft compresses 300 years of archives into 1200 footnotes, 12 chapters, and countless literary accounts told by Black farmers, civil rights leaders, and pioneers in the agricultural movement.

This is a heart-wrenching chronicle of how Blacks went from owning upwards of 16 to 20 million acres to the current estimate of 4.5 million acres. Jillian Hishaw thoroughly explains why over 97% of U.S. land is owned by White Americans and less than 3% is owned by people of color. The strategic immigration of Europeans and the adoption of English common law led to the murderous dispossession of tribal land as well. U.S. property laws have tactically benefitted Whites by allowing them to acquire stolen land and using it as collateral to secure their economic position for centuries. As Blacks continue to lose 30,000 acres per year in land ownership the need for legal and economic resolutions is immediate.

Buy this book directly from the author here. 

Classified

By Traci Sorell, Natasha Donovan (illustrator),

Book cover of Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer

What do you think of when you picture an aerospace engineer? It’s probably some white guy in a white shirt. A native woman certainly doesn’t fit that stereotype, but that didn’t matter to Mary Gold Ross. It’s so rare to see books biographies about people who are Native working in STEM, yet representation matters.

Classified

By Traci Sorell, Natasha Donovan (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Classified as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Discover the story of how a math-loving girl blazed a trail for herself and others in this American Indian Library Association Youth Literature Award Honor Picture Book, Classified: Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, a biography for children ages 7 – 11

Mary Golda Ross designed classified airplanes and spacecraft as Lockheed Aircraft Corporation's first female engineer. Find out how her passion for math and the Cherokee values she was raised with shaped her life and work.

Cherokee author Traci Sorell and Métis illustrator Natasha Donovan trace Ross's journey from being the only girl in a high school math class…


Who am I?

I’ve always loved math and science. When I decided to become a writer, I knew I wanted to share this love with children through my writing. Did I know I would one day have five published picture book biographies of women in STEM and three more on the way? Absolutely not. I feel fortunate I’ve had the opportunity to tell the stories of many unsung women scientists and mathematicians. To this end, I keep an ever-growing, ever-changing list of possible subjects for future biographies.


I wrote...

Code Breaker, Spy Hunter: How Elizebeth Friedman Changed the Course of Two World Wars

By Laurie Wallmark, Brooke Smart (illustrator),

Book cover of Code Breaker, Spy Hunter: How Elizebeth Friedman Changed the Course of Two World Wars

What is my book about?

In this picture book biography, young readers will learn all about Elizebeth Friedman, a brilliant American code breaker who smashed Nazi spy rings, took down gangsters, and created the CIA's first cryptology unit. Her story came to light when her secret papers were finally declassified in 2015. From thwarting notorious rumrunners with only paper and pencil to counter-spying into the minds and activities of Nazis, Elizebeth held a pivotal role in the early days of US cryptology. No code was too challenging for her to crack, and Elizebeth's work undoubtedly saved thousands of lives. 

Extensive back matter includes explanations of codes and ciphers, further information on cryptology, a bibliography, a timeline of Elizebeth's life, plus secret messages for young readers to decode.

We Are Grateful

By Traci Sorell, Frane Lessac (illustrator),

Book cover of We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga

This is a delightful journey of seeing the thankfulness expressed by the Cherokee people for the gifts of each season.  Reader and listeners might pause and think about “what is something for which I am thankful?” Page by page this question is answered as one becomes aware of the gifts we often take for granted—water to refresh us; air to sustain us; earth to hold us; and family who love us, and thus we give thanks. 

We Are Grateful

By Traci Sorell, Frane Lessac (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked We Are Grateful as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

2019 Sibert Honor Book
2019 Orbis Pictus Honor Book
NPR's Guide To 2018’s Great Reads
2018 Book Launch Award (SCBWI)
Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2018
School Library Journal Best Books of 2018

2018 JLG selection
2019 Reading the West Picture Book Award

The Cherokee community is grateful for blessings and challenges that each season brings. This is modern Native American life as told by an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation.

The word otsaliheliga (oh-jah-LEE-hay-lee-gah) is used by members of the Cherokee Nation to express gratitude. Beginning in the fall with the new year and ending in summer, follow…


Who am I?

Stories help us understand ourselves, another culture, or a new student sitting alone at a nearby desk. While teaching, working side by side, and living on the Navajo Nation for nearly twenty years, I wanted to share some of the special and surprising aspects of their culture—especially the kindness, wisdom, and the laughter Navajo people shared with me. Laughter is a holy gift for the Navajo people. First Laugh shows the reader why this is true. My books have been given a variety of national and international awards but the best reward is when a child looks up while reading one of my books, quietly grins, and then proudly says, “I am in this book.”


I wrote...

First Laugh, Welcome, Baby!

By Rose Ann Tahe, Nancy Bo Flood, Jonathan Nelson (illustrator)

Book cover of First Laugh, Welcome, Baby!

What is my book about?

Imagine celebrating a baby’s first laugh with the entire family present—young and old, far and near. First Laugh invites you to experience a unique Navajo tradition that is celebrated today.  This celebration (La’tse Awee’ ch’ideeldloh) is a child’s first formal welcome into one’s family. A taste of salt is given to each guest as a reminder to be kind and generous. From their child’s first act of sharing, the parents hope their child will have a happy life with much laughter and love and will always gladly give to anyone in need. Fun glimpses of family antics are woven into this story as siblings and grandparents try to make this grumpy baby laugh. Jonathan Nelson’s art illustrates the land, the people, the celebration.

Another Country

By Christopher Camuto,

Book cover of Another Country: Journeying toward the Cherokee Mountains

Camuto’s supple prose draws the reader into a journey toward mountains that no longer exist, although they are named on some old maps: the southern Appalachians not as they are, but as they were before the European invasion. A keen historian and observant naturalist, Camuto walks deep into “what’s left of the backcountry,” documenting the hopeful reintroduction of the nearly extinct red wolf and reflecting on Cherokee place names, culture, and history. "Needless to say,” he confesses, “I never got to the Cherokee Mountains”—and, in sad irony, shortly after the book’s publication the red wolf reintroduction failed. Still, Camuto has succeeded in recording resonant reminiscences of places, peoples, and biotic populations now lost.

Another Country

By Christopher Camuto,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Another Country as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The southern Appalachians encompass one of the most beautiful, biologically diverse, and historically important regions of North America. In the widely acclaimed Another Country: Journeying toward the Cherokee Mountains, Christopher Camuto describes the tragic collision of natural and cultural history embedded in the region. In the spirit of Thoreau's "Walking," Camuto explores the Appalachian summit country of the Great Smoky Mountains-the historical home of the Cherokee-searching for access to the nature, history, and spirit of a magnificent, if diminished, landscape.

As the author takes the reader through old-growth forests and ancient myths, he tells of the attempted restoration of Canis…


Who am I?

I moved from Ohio to southern Appalachia in 1978 to take a temporary job teaching philosophy at the University of Tennessee.  I hadn’t planned to stay, but I fell in love with the mountains. Recently I retired after a fruitful 44-year career here. Concern for this land and for my children and grandchildren led me to environmental activism and shifted my teaching and writing from mathematical logic to environmental and intergenerational ethics. Eventually I wrote or edited four books on environmental matters (two specifically on the southern Appalachian environment) in addition to three on logic and (most recently) a tome on the tricky topic of incomparable values.


I wrote...

A Land Imperiled: The Declining Health of the Southern Appalachian Bioregion

By John Nolt,

Book cover of A Land Imperiled: The Declining Health of the Southern Appalachian Bioregion

What is my book about?

It offers a broad and richly detailed survey of overlapping health threats to America’s most biologically diverse region. Central to the book’s conception is the idea of “health writ large”—that is, the functional integrity—not only of humans and their organizations, but of all living things and the ecosystems that sustain them. Sections contributed by regional experts on air, water, flora and fauna, food, energy, waste, transportation, population, and urbanization assess the functional integrity of these aspects of southern Appalachia, while chapters on future prospects and models of sustainability consider ways to improve health writ large.   

Betty

By Tiffany McDaniel,

Book cover of Betty

Betty is a fictionalized account of Tiffany McDaniel’s mother’s upbringing in the foothills of the Appalachians. It is a stark rendering of how family secrets, hidden by the previous generations, often inadvertently spill into the future and affect other family members. 

McDaniel’s hard-hitting story is filled with abuse of all kinds. It is a tale of struggle, hardship, and determination, as her mother, Betty Carpenter, learns of her own mother’s past and copes with a Cherokee heritage from her father. This novel is sure to leave an indelible mark on any reader, but it also shines a light of hope and reveals the perseverance of the human spirit.

Betty

By Tiffany McDaniel,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Betty as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

'A coming-of-age story filled with magic in language and plot: beautiful and devastating'
Observer, Books of the Year

'I felt consumed by this book. I loved it, you will love it'
Daisy Johnson, author of Sisters

'A page-turning Appalachian coming-of-age story told in undulating prose that settles right into you'
Naoise Dolan, author of Exciting Times

'Vivid and lucid, Betty has stayed with me'
Kiran Millwood Hargrave, author of The Mercies

'I loved Betty'
Fiona Mozley, author of Hot Stew

'Breahtaking'
Vogue

'A GIRL COMES OF AGE AGAINST THE KNIFE'

So begins the story of Betty Carpenter.
Born in a…


Who am I?

As a born southerner, it comes as no surprise, I have a lot of love for the place I call home. My passion for reading and writing about this unique and individual region, and sharing some of its history, culture, and way of life is important to me. I find the South at times a misunderstood place and believe there are still some misconceptions that remain, even today. Through sharing the stories I love, I endeavor to impart, in some small way, the uniqueness of this region that many are drawn to, and why those of us who grew up here, love it so.


I wrote...

Book cover of The Saints of Swallow Hill: A Fascinating Depression Era Historical Novel

What is my book about?

Set against the background of the Great Depression, this lyrical new novel is a powerful story of courage, survival, and friendship. Deep in the American South there once existed turpentine labor camps, notoriously squalid and hazardous environments. 

Swallow Hill is such a labor camp and three individuals, Delwood Reese, Rae Lynn Cobb, and Cornelia Riddle, each end up at this labor camp for their own personal reasons. There they come up against a dangerous boss man, a woods rider who goes by the name of Crow. Even as the three forge a strong bond, they will be forced to come to terms with the events of their past in order to escape the slave-like encampment, and seize the chance to begin again. 

Taking on the Billionaire

By Robin Covington,

Book cover of Taking on the Billionaire

I don’t usually read billionaire romance because the billionaires are often crappy humans, and I don’t enjoy reading about crappy people getting a happily-ever-after. This book was a great exception. Adam Redhawk isn’t just a billionaire, he’s an Eastern Band Cherokee billionaire who was taken from his home and community when he was a child. Now he’s hired a PI to help him find his long-lost siblings to reconnect with the past that was stolen from him. I enjoyed the romance and the characters a lot. If you read billionaire romance, let this be one of them.

Taking on the Billionaire

By Robin Covington,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Taking on the Billionaire as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Will the woman he can’t resist be his downfall? Find out, only from USA TODAY bestselling author Robin Covington!

In the boardroom—and the bedroom—they’re on fire.

But will her secrets destroy them both?

Investigator Tess Lynch once helped Adam Redhawk find his Cherokee family. Now the self-made tech billionaire wants her to root out his company’s saboteur—and share his bed. But as passion builds between them, the private eye pursues a plan of her own—to get even for the way Adam’s adoptive father ruined hers. Until an unexpected pregnancy changes everything…

From Harlequin Desire: Luxury, scandal, desire—welcome to the lives…


Who am I?

I am an award-winning author of sex-positive contemporary romance and a citizen of the Cherokee Nation. As a reader, I’ve grown weary of Native American romance characters who are mostly caricatures and stereotypes. Last year, I went on a quest to find romance stories that portrayed contemporary Native characters experiencing love as they navigated real life in the 21st century. And who better to tell those stories than Native authors using their own voice? Now that I’ve found several great Native romance authors, I want to share these recommendations far and wide. Come, come, read Native romance!


I wrote...

The Road Home

By Christina Berry,

Book cover of The Road Home

What is my book about?

Sex and rock & roll are Jake Sixkiller’s top priorities. As frontman of Austin’s hottest band and with a long line of lovers knocking on his bedroom door, he has it all. Until a car accident shakes his world to its core. With his best friend in the hospital, he’s flooded with memories of the night he lost his family at the hands of a drunk driver.

Amid the turmoil, he finds solace with Nicole, aka Arson Nic, a roller derby dynamo who throws Jake into a tailspin. When he’s offered a once-in-a-lifetime tour opportunity that brings him back to the Cherokee reservation where he grew up, Jake must decide what matters most, a future still unwritten or a past he buried long ago.

Trees of Georgia and Adjacent States

By Claud L. Brown, L. Katherine Kirkman,

Book cover of Trees of Georgia and Adjacent States

Because Mr. Newcomb’s book (above) covers only herbs, shrubs, and vines, the survival student needs a good tree identifier (field guide) to cover “the standing people.” (The Cherokee name for “trees.”) Because I live in Georgia, this book serves me well. If you live outside of the Southeast, you’ll want to find a book germane to your area. Trees of Georgia contains good photographs of leaves, bark, flowers, buds, and fruits of over 200 species.

Trees of Georgia and Adjacent States

By Claud L. Brown, L. Katherine Kirkman,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Trees of Georgia and Adjacent States as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This field guide identifies 205 species and varieties, with plant descriptions that highlight differences between similar taxa. It also includes range maps and botanical keys for summer and winter.


Who am I?

As a child I was drawn to the forest by its aesthetics. I felt as if I were wandering through a masterpiece painting. As I grew older, I wanted to know more about the many working parts of nature. I quickly learned this: If I wanted to know nature intimately, I needed to know what the Native Americans knew. After years of study and honing skills, I undertook seasonal, self-imposed “survival trips” in remote areas of the National Forest. As an adult I served as a naturalist for the Georgia Conservancy, wilderness director for High Meadows Camp, and as director of my own wilderness school – Medicine Bow – in the Appalachian Mountains.



I wrote...

Wild Plants and Survival Lore: Secrets of the Forest

By Mark Warren,

Book cover of Wild Plants and Survival Lore: Secrets of the Forest

What is my book about?

This comprehensive study of North American plants leads the reader through proper identification of 100 common botanical species and how to use them as foods, medicines, craft materials, soaps, and insect repellents borrowing primarily from Native American traditions and backing up those ancient uses by modern research. Also covered are weather-proof shelter building, primitive cooking techniques, hunting with a throwing stick, water purification without metal cookware, and more.

Not only does this book appeal to the newcomer to survival skills by immersing him/her into the fine details of woods lore, it is also written for the teacher, parent, scout leader, park ranger, and nature center educator by presenting a lesson plan for over 200 projects or activities designed to edify and inspire young ones to return to nature.

Marked

By P. C. Cast, Kristin Cast,

Book cover of Marked

I remember finding this book so intriguing at the time. For a start, it's written by two authors, a mother and daughter team. Growing up I used to write with friends and family, each taking in turns to write a page and then passing it to the other for their turn. It was great fun, but ultimately ended in a mess as we were each fighting to take the story in the direction we wanted. So I enjoyed that the partnership in Marked worked.

The magic and ritual element also drew me in. As someone who dabbles in the spiritual, with card reading, candles, and the like, it was interesting to see how it could be brought into fiction in a different way while also introducing some Cherokee wisdom.

Marked

By P. C. Cast, Kristin Cast,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Marked as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

"The House of Night" series is set in a world very much like our own, except in sixteen-year-old Zoey Redbird's world, vampyres have always existed. In this first book in the series, Zoey enters the House of Night, a school where, after having undergone the Change, she will train to become an adult vampyre - that is, if she makes it through the Change. Not all of those who are chosen do. It's tough to begin a new life, away from her parents and friends, and on top of that, Zoey finds she is no average fledgling. She has been…


Who am I?

I’m an author of contemporary/urban fantasy, and an avid reader of the genre for over twenty-five years. I can still remember my very first vampire read, Secret Vampire by LJ Smith. I don't get to read as many books as I would like, partly because I take my time to ensure I don’t skim over details. This way, the story sinks in and its meaning becomes deeper and clearer. I also apply this to my own books to give the reader an immersive experience. As a British author, all of my writing is set in the UK, which I think brings a different dimension to a market that's flooded with novels based in the USA.


I wrote...

Sorceress Of Truth

By J.D. Groom,

Book cover of Sorceress Of Truth

What is my book about?

Tory Harper wants nothing more than to fit in. Her relentless classmates made her school life hell, so a family relocation and change of schools was a welcome relief. Adopted into an eclectic group, she is enraptured by the spirited Pepper, a student with boundless energy, and Kylan, the 'big brother' with a troubled past of his own.

When a house party becomes a feeding frenzy, and no one is what they first appeared, she is plunged into a world of magic and mystery. With vampires intent on raising a demon, threatening the balance of life as we know it, will Tory unravel her truth before it's too late?

Skinwalker

By Faith Hunter,

Book cover of Skinwalker

While this urban fantasy series isn’t Japanese per se, it’s full of realistic martial arts action. I love this series because of the unique mixture of concepts, and the well-imagined and likeable characters, even the bad guys. Jane Yellowrock is a shotgun-toting, motorbike riding, kick ass woman. She’s also a Cherokee Skinwalker (shapeshifter) and a security professional who works for vampire organizations to hunt down and kill their rogues; those who can't control themselves from biting humans. The books are set in modern New Orleans, which is quite an interesting location for me. I just don’t think you can get a better or weirder combination of ideas: Cherokee mythology and vampires. It may sound like a weird concept, but there are 13 books in the series. It works. 

Skinwalker

By Faith Hunter,

Why should I read it?

4 authors picked Skinwalker as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Meet shapeshifting skinwalker Jane Yellowrock in the first novel in the New York Times bestselling series that captures “the essence of urban fantasy” (SF Site).

Jane Yellowrock is the last of her kind—a skinwalker of Cherokee descent who can turn into any creature she desires and hunts vampires for a living. But now she’s been hired by Katherine Fontaneau, one of the oldest vampires in New Orleans and the madam of Katies’s Ladies, to hunt a powerful rogue vampire who’s killing other vamps.

Amidst a bordello full of real “ladies of the night,” and a hot Cajun biker with a…


Who am I?

I’ve been interested in Japanese culture, mythology, and martial arts since I was a teenager. My favorite books are those where I become completely submerged, losing myself in the story and forgetting where the main character ends and I begin. Stories that focus on an ordinary person who gets pulled into another world while remaining firmly planted in their current world. Stories where the character has to learn new skills or discover special talents; a connection to the past or to another realm; or becomes part of some mysterious group operating outside of society. When I couldn’t find enough books that fulfilled my hunger for this specific genre, I decided to write some myself!


I wrote...

The Gatekeeper's Son: Book One

By C.R. Fladmark,

Book cover of The Gatekeeper's Son: Book One

What is my book about?

Junya’s grandfather is a billionaire who keeps the secret to his success hidden in a heavily guarded safe. His mother is a martial artist who wields a razor-sharp katana—and seems to read his mind. And a mysterious girl in a Japanese school uniform can knock him over—literally—with just a look. What do they know that he doesn’t? Junya’s life takes a dangerous turn on his sixteenth birthday when someone sets out to destroy not only the family’s business empire—the one that he’s set to inherit—but Junya himself. He’s fighting for his life and doesn’t know who to trust. What has his family been keeping from him? Junya’s journey takes him from the narrow streets of San Francisco to Japan. In a mystical world he’s never imagined, he finds his true destiny.

Book cover of Travels Through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East and West Florida, the Cherokee Country, the Extensive Territories of the Muscogulges or Creek Confederacy, and the Country of the Chactaws

It rings with awe-struck musings on Bartram’s explorations, begun just before the American revolution, of the lush and bountiful landscapes of the southern British colonies. Bartram’s effusive descriptions of the astonishingly profuse flora and fauna, replete with taxonomic names, provide a baseline for gauging the steep ecological declines that followed. The Penguin edition includes an appreciative introduction by American writer James Dickey, best known for his novel Deliverance.

Travels Through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East and West Florida, the Cherokee Country, the Extensive Territories of the Muscogulges or Creek Confederacy, and the Country of the Chactaws

By William Bartram,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Travels Through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East and West Florida, the Cherokee Country, the Extensive Territories of the Muscogulges or Creek Confederacy, and the Country of the Chactaws as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

At the request of Dr. Fothergill, of London, to search the Floridas, and the western parts of Carolina and Georgia, for the discovery of rare and useful productions of nature, chiefly in the vegetable kingdom; in April, 1773, I embarked for Charleston, South Carolina, on board the brigantine Charleston Packet, Captain Wright, the brig——, Captain Mason, being in company with us, and bound to the same port. We had a pleasant run down the Delaware, 150 miles to Cape Henlopen, the two vessels entering the Atlantic together. For the first twenty-four hours, we had a prosperous gale, and were cheerful…


Who am I?

I moved from Ohio to southern Appalachia in 1978 to take a temporary job teaching philosophy at the University of Tennessee.  I hadn’t planned to stay, but I fell in love with the mountains. Recently I retired after a fruitful 44-year career here. Concern for this land and for my children and grandchildren led me to environmental activism and shifted my teaching and writing from mathematical logic to environmental and intergenerational ethics. Eventually I wrote or edited four books on environmental matters (two specifically on the southern Appalachian environment) in addition to three on logic and (most recently) a tome on the tricky topic of incomparable values.


I wrote...

A Land Imperiled: The Declining Health of the Southern Appalachian Bioregion

By John Nolt,

Book cover of A Land Imperiled: The Declining Health of the Southern Appalachian Bioregion

What is my book about?

It offers a broad and richly detailed survey of overlapping health threats to America’s most biologically diverse region. Central to the book’s conception is the idea of “health writ large”—that is, the functional integrity—not only of humans and their organizations, but of all living things and the ecosystems that sustain them. Sections contributed by regional experts on air, water, flora and fauna, food, energy, waste, transportation, population, and urbanization assess the functional integrity of these aspects of southern Appalachia, while chapters on future prospects and models of sustainability consider ways to improve health writ large.   

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