10 books like Descent

By Sam Mariano,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like Descent. Shepherd is a community of 7,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Degradation

By Stylo Fantome,

Book cover of Degradation

Messed up, crazy, destructive relationships are my jam and Stylo Fantome nails the fantasy in Degradation, book one of the Kane Trilogy. I’m also ever intrigued by power imbalance, something spotlighted between Jameson and Tatum. Add to that their searing chemistry and humiliation kink, and this book is fire. Highly recommend if you’re looking for dirty billionaires. 

Degradation

By Stylo Fantome,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Degradation as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Eighteen year old Tatum O'Shea is a naive, shy, little rich girl. Twenty-three year old Jameson Kane is smart, seductive, and richer. They come together for one night, one explosion, one mistake, and Tate is hurled into space – no family, no money, and no Jameson.

Seven years later, life is going pretty good for Tate, when she runs into Jameson again. This time, she thinks she's ready for him. She doesn't have a naive bone left in her body, and she can't even remember what shy feels like. Jameson has evolved, as well – sharp words, sharper wit, and…


Complete Submission

By CD Reiss,

Book cover of Complete Submission

It’s impossible to talk about kinky billionaires without mentioning Jonathan Drazen. Featuring an up-and-coming lounge singer and the rich man who wants to have his way with her, Reiss avoids the stereotypical BDSM tropes, delivering a fresh and unique look at a healthy kink relationship. Though the book is coming on its tenth anniversary, it remains legendary for any true dirty billionaire fan.

Complete Submission

By CD Reiss,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Complete Submission as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The COMPLETE USA Today Bestselling series
Jonathan Drazen is a beautiful, damaged billionaire with a taste for obedience. 
Monica is a struggling musician who obeys no man.
But she just made a little wager with him--one she's sure she can win.
If she loses, she spends the night under his command.

If she wins... it doesn't matter. She just found out Jonathan doesn't lose his bets, and his women always end up where he wants them.

And this little bet? Turns out it's for far more than a night on her knees.


Dark Reign

By Amelia Wilde,

Book cover of Dark Reign

Psychological games and manipulation are two of my favorite dark romance tropes, and Amelia weaves both into this steamy release from Dangerous Press. Twisty and sexy, Dark Reign keeps readers on their toes and delivers a satisfying cliffhanger to boot. I couldn’t wait to dive into the second book, which landed even better than the first.

Dark Reign

By Amelia Wilde,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Dark Reign as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

"Dark Reign is sinful, deliciously complex and naughty, with an anti-hero who's hauntingly addicting." - Marni Mann, USA Today bestselling author

Wealthy. Reclusive. Dangerous. Emerson LeBlanc doesn’t enter society much. He only ventures out in pursuit of new art for his collection. It starts with a haunting painting. Then he meets the artist...

Innocent Daphne Morelli is more exquisite than anything he’s ever seen. He becomes obsessed with her. It doesn’t matter that she’s a living, breathing person with her own hopes and dreams.

She’ll be the perfect addition to his collection.


The Initiation

By Nikki Sloane,

Book cover of The Initiation

I could not put this book down. Already a favorite author of mine, Nikki Sloane surprised me with this sensual fairytale of a novel. It’s both inventive and twisted, deftly handling the love triangle as well as the power dynamics. Not only does Sloane knock the kink out of the park in this one, she also conveys all the fantasy of the uber-rich life without missing a thing.

The Initiation

By Nikki Sloane,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Initiation as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

No one knows how new members are selected to the board of Hale Banking and Holding. But there are rumors of a sordid rite of initiation.

Whispers how one woman and nine men disappear into a boardroom.

This time, that woman will be me.

The Hale family owns everything—the eighth largest bank in the world, everyone in our town, even the mortgage on my parents’ mansion. And now Royce Hale wants to own me.

He is charming. Seductive. Ruthless. But above all, he’s the prince of lies. My body may tighten with white-hot desire under his penetrating gaze, but I…


Shanna

By Kathleen E. Woodiwiss,

Book cover of Shanna

A classic that probably hasn’t made its way onto many modern lists. But this book, in its nearly seven hundred pages, will absolutely carry any reader away. Shanna is a feisty, rambunctious, often bitchy, often wrong, character. She’s so clever that she gets in her own way. You never know what she’s going to do, but you know she’s too big for the life she is being threatened with and that she’ll do anything to make sure she doesn’t fall victim to a life that will bore her. She refuses to be a wasted woman. Also? This book is jampacked with very, very hot sexual tension.

Shanna

By Kathleen E. Woodiwiss,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Shanna as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

"Shanna" is a magnificent tale of freedom and passionate destiny from incomparable storyteller Kathleen Woodiwiss. In 1749, heiress Shanna Trahern marries convict Ruark Beauchamp, only to abandon her bridegroom to set sail to the Caribbean, with her determined bridegroom in pursuit.


Comfort Women

By Yoshimi Yoshiaki, Suzanne O'Brien (translator),

Book cover of Comfort Women

This book is essential reading on the “comfort women” issue. Originally published in Japanese in 1995, it has inspired many readers to look more deeply into the history of Imperial Japan's wartime “comfort women.” I consulted this book frequently in my own research and writing about the subject. The book provides a wealth of documentary evidence and first-person testimonies, convincingly proving the Japanese military’s direct involvement in setting up and administering the comfort stations. This English edition includes introductions by both the author and the translator, making the story accessible for English-speaking readers. 

Comfort Women

By Yoshimi Yoshiaki, Suzanne O'Brien (translator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Comfort Women as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The colorful handmade costumes of beads and feathers swirl frenetically, as the Mardi Gras Indians dance through the streets of New Orleans in remembrance of a widely disputed cultural heritage. Iroquois Indians visit London in the early part of the eighteenth century and give birth to the "feathered people" in the British popular imagination. What do these seemingly disparate strands of culture share over three hundred years and several thousand miles of ocean? Artfully interweaving theatrical, musical, and ritual performance from the eighteenth century to the present in London and New Orleans, Cities of the Dead takes a look at…


The Reaper's Garden

By Vincent Brown,

Book cover of The Reaper's Garden: Death and Power in the World of Atlantic Slavery

A gripping and inventive study of death’s impact on social life in Britain’s largest, most profitable, and deadliest Caribbean slave colony: Jamaica. Brown shows how staggering mortality rates on the island, where the prospect of an early death awaited enslaved and free alike, profoundly shaped colonial culture, social relations, and spiritual practices. In Jamaica, the vital hub of Britain’s Atlantic slave empire, death was at once destructive and generative; it claimed countless lives sacrificed in the pursuit of British profits and inspired new, politically charged commemorative rituals and forms of enslaved resistance.

The Reaper’s Garden uncovers the interplay between death, wealth, and power in the British Atlantic and does so from the perspective of the African captives who not only endured but also drew power from the horrors of Atlantic slavery.

The Reaper's Garden

By Vincent Brown,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Reaper's Garden as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Winner of the Merle Curti Award
Winner of the James A. Rawley Prize
Winner of the Louis Gottschalk Prize
Longlisted for the Cundill Prize

"Vincent Brown makes the dead talk. With his deep learning and powerful historical imagination, he calls upon the departed to explain the living. The Reaper's Garden stretches the historical canvas and forces readers to think afresh. It is a major contribution to the history of Atlantic slavery."-Ira Berlin

From the author of Tacky's Revolt, a landmark study of life and death in colonial Jamaica at the zenith of the British slave empire.

What did people make…


Survivors of Slavery

By Laura T. Murphy,

Book cover of Survivors of Slavery: Modern-Day Slave Narratives

Laura Murphy uses nearly forty survivor narratives from around the world to demonstrate that slavery is not a heinous phenomenon of the past, but of the present as well. Her work is essential to students of American history; it ensures that slavery is never presented as merely a crime of the past or only as a despicable practice isolated to one geographic region.

Survivors of Slavery

By Laura T. Murphy,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Survivors of Slavery as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Slavery is not a crime confined to the far reaches of history. It is an injustice that continues to entrap twenty-seven million people across the globe. Laura Murphy offers close to forty survivor narratives from Cambodia, Ghana, Lebanon, Macedonia, Mexico, Russia, Thailand, Ukraine, and the United States, detailing the horrors of a system that forces people to work without pay and against their will, under the threat of violence, with little or no means of escape. Representing a variety of circumstances in diverse contexts, these survivors are the Frederick Douglasses, Sojourner Truths, and Olaudah Equianos of our time, testifying to…


The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African

By Olaudah Equiano,

Book cover of The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African

Equiano’s text is part of the plethora of autobiographical narratives written by formerly enslaved persons who worked to abolish the slave trade in the 18th and 19th centuries. In this text is all the classic themes and conventions of the genre – the quest for freedom, trauma, dislocation, etc. – but Equinao text distinguishes itself as one of the few slave narratives that provide a detailed portrayal of an enslaved person’s formative years in Africa (in this case, Igboland, modern-day Nigeria), before enslavement in the New World. The unique aspect of the text allows meditations on identity, family, and childhood as formed and deformed by slavery. 

The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African

By Olaudah Equiano,

Why should I read it?

3 authors picked The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African, first published in 1789, is the autobiography of Olaudah Equiano. The narrative is argued to be a variety of styles, such as a slavery narrative, travel narrative, and spiritual narrative. The book describes Equiano's time spent in enslavement, and documents his attempts at becoming an independent man through his study of the Bible, and his eventual success in gaining his own freedom and in business thereafter.

The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano was one of the first widely read slave narratives. Eight editions…


The Dilemma of a Ghost

By Christina Ama Ata. Aidoo,

Book cover of The Dilemma of a Ghost

The 1960s and 70s were periods of Black Consciousness, both in Africa and the diaspora. At the heart of this was Pan-Africanism, a political ideology built on historical and cultural links between Black people everywhere. At the heart of these ideas was a psychical and physical “return” to Africa, the “motherland”. This short, but powerful play, explore these politics in the marriage of Ato Yawson and Eulalie Rush, a Ghanaian man and an African-American woman who emigrate from the US to Ghana in search of racial and cultural harmony. What occurs is a dramatization of what happens when political ideologies are applied to private lives. What I love about this text is its confrontation of slavery as traumas that cannot be easily erased by political rhetoric and national endeavors to “move on.”

The Dilemma of a Ghost

By Christina Ama Ata. Aidoo,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Dilemma of a Ghost as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


5 book lists we think you will like!

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