The best books about Black culture and history in the Civil Rights era

Jonathan Shandell Author Of The American Negro Theatre and the Long Civil Rights Era
By Jonathan Shandell

The Books I Picked & Why

Radical Vision: A Biography of Lorraine Hansberry

By Soyica Diggs Colbert

Radical Vision: A Biography of Lorraine Hansberry

Why this book?

I’ve taught Lorraine Hansberry’s landmark 1959 play A Raisin in the Sun many times in my university courses. That play transformed African American theater in the Civil Rights era and marked a phenomenal debut for its 29-year-old writer. In her too-short life (she died a few years later from pancreatic cancer), Hansberry built an extraordinary life as a writer, intellectual, and political activist. This biography tells that rich, remarkable story.


When you buy a book we may earn a small commission.

Becoming Belafonte: Black Artist, Public Radical

By Judith E. Smith

Becoming Belafonte: Black Artist, Public Radical

Why this book?

As I was writing my book, I delved more into the professional singing career of Harry Belafonte. I knew him as the singer of familiar, toe-tapping, globally-inspired hits (i.e. “The Banana Boat Song,” “Jump In the Line,” “Matilda”). I didn’t know about the depth and breadth of his commitment to racial justice. Nor did I realize, more importantly, how his Civil Rights activism informed and shaped his artistic career as an actor and a musician. An eye-opening read about a cultural icon.


When you buy a book we may earn a small commission.

Black Is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy

By Nikhil Pal Singh

Black Is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy

Why this book?

We often learn about African American history in the 20th Century in terms of a conflict between nonviolent resistance vs. violent radicalism, integrationism vs. separatism, Martin vs. Malcolm. But this is an over-simplification of a complex and dynamic moment in the history of our nation. More than any other work, Black is a Country helped me think differently about the period that I study, and see African American history and culture of the mid-20th Century in a new way.


When you buy a book we may earn a small commission.

Reclaiming 42: Public Memory and the Reframing of Jackie Robinson's Radical Legacy

By David Naze

Reclaiming 42: Public Memory and the Reframing of Jackie Robinson's Radical Legacy

Why this book?

Perhaps no one is more readily identified with racial integration than Jackie Robinson. Our culture now lionizes Robinson for his accomplishments, but also for having “guts enough not to fight back” (as his general manager Branch Rickey reportedly said to him) against the bigotry and insults that surrounded him. In many ways, the story of Jackie Robinson as a quiet, passive figure who just let his playing do the talking is incomplete. This book reveals more of the story of Robinson’s historic and sometimes surprisingly “radical” work in breaking baseball’s color barrier.


When you buy a book we may earn a small commission.

Sistuhs in the Struggle: An Oral History of Black Arts Movement Theater and Performance

By La Donna Forsgren

Sistuhs in the Struggle: An Oral History of Black Arts Movement Theater and Performance

Why this book?

We tend to think about the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s as dominated by militant male voices. This book explores the rich contributions of black women artists to the movement—by amplifying the voices of women artists in their own words. The book is a collection of oral histories, drawing on dozens of interviews with influential Black women artists. Some of them are recognizable, like playwrights/poets Sonia Sanchez and Ntozake Shange. Others are less familiar names whose influence should be appreciated more fully. This is a rich celebration of the impact of women artists during a key period of African American cultural change.


When you buy a book we may earn a small commission.

Closely Related Book Lists

Distantly Related Book Lists

Random Book Lists