19 books like The Collector's Book of Fluorescent Minerals

By Manuel A. Robbins,

Here are 19 books that The Collector's Book of Fluorescent Minerals fans have personally recommended if you like The Collector's Book of Fluorescent Minerals. Shepherd is a community of 10,000+ authors and super readers sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Book cover of Fluorescence: Gems and Minerals Under Ultraviolet Light

Stuart Schneider Author Of Collecting Fluorescent Minerals

From my list on collecting fluorescent minerals.

Why am I passionate about this?

I was introduced to Fluorescent Mineral collecting by my son. I started going to shows, joining mineral groups, and reading everything I could on fluorescent minerals. Realizing that there were no books with lots of photographs on the subject, and having written quite a few heavily illustrated books of collecting subjects, I decided to to a book that would appeal to new and old mineral collectors. The book was a success and lead to the publishing of a second book. Lots of fluorescent mineral experts helped by reviewing the text and photos for accuracy, and my publisher was pleased with the success of the books. Schiffer Books started an entirely new avenue of books on Minerals that it now publishes.

Stuart's book list on collecting fluorescent minerals

Stuart Schneider Why did Stuart love this book?

Manny Robbins' second book on fluorescent minerals which came out in 1994. It sold for $49.95, but now appears to be out of print but still fairly easy to find. This is a much more technical read, but has good information.

By Manuel A. Robbins,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Fluorescence as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

For both professional mineralogists and recreational gemologists, identifies all the known locations where fluorescent minerals are found, all known species of them with quick-reference color guides, and all mineral activators and the minerals they produce fluorescence in. Also discusses in depth some key minerals, and explains how to preform simple experiments at home or in the classroom that demonstrate the underlying principles of fluorescence. Includes 12 pages of color plates. Available from Geoscience Press, Inc., 12629 N. Tatum Blvd., Suite 201, Phoenix, AZ 85032. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.


Book cover of Rainbow Minerals of Franklin/Sterling Hill, New Jersey: A Color Portfolio of Minerals from the Fluorescent Mineral Capitol of the World

Stuart Schneider Author Of Collecting Fluorescent Minerals

From my list on collecting fluorescent minerals.

Why am I passionate about this?

I was introduced to Fluorescent Mineral collecting by my son. I started going to shows, joining mineral groups, and reading everything I could on fluorescent minerals. Realizing that there were no books with lots of photographs on the subject, and having written quite a few heavily illustrated books of collecting subjects, I decided to to a book that would appeal to new and old mineral collectors. The book was a success and lead to the publishing of a second book. Lots of fluorescent mineral experts helped by reviewing the text and photos for accuracy, and my publisher was pleased with the success of the books. Schiffer Books started an entirely new avenue of books on Minerals that it now publishes.

Stuart's book list on collecting fluorescent minerals

Stuart Schneider Why did Stuart love this book?

Rainbow Minerals is the best bargain for $6.95 by Bob Jones (printed by Tom Warren). It can be tougher to find, but is sometimes available on eBay. It has a small group of color photos.

Book cover of Ultraviolet Light and Fluorescent Minerals: Understanding, Collecting and Displaying Fluorescent Minerals

Stuart Schneider Author Of Collecting Fluorescent Minerals

From my list on collecting fluorescent minerals.

Why am I passionate about this?

I was introduced to Fluorescent Mineral collecting by my son. I started going to shows, joining mineral groups, and reading everything I could on fluorescent minerals. Realizing that there were no books with lots of photographs on the subject, and having written quite a few heavily illustrated books of collecting subjects, I decided to to a book that would appeal to new and old mineral collectors. The book was a success and lead to the publishing of a second book. Lots of fluorescent mineral experts helped by reviewing the text and photos for accuracy, and my publisher was pleased with the success of the books. Schiffer Books started an entirely new avenue of books on Minerals that it now publishes.

Stuart's book list on collecting fluorescent minerals

Stuart Schneider Why did Stuart love this book?

Ultraviolet Light and Fluorescent Minerals is also a pretty good read. It is a good general overview of the subject and nicely covers the field of fluorescent activators. It doesn't have many color photographs. It was written by 4 experts in the field including the late, great Thomas Warren (he passed away in 2001) who invented the portable SW mineral lamp. Another one of my favorite guys is Earl Verbeek. He is friendly and knows his rocks. He is the curator of the Sterling Hill Mining Museum. That is the complete list of books on Fluorescent minerals, not including my two books.

By Thomas S. Warren, Sterling Gleason, Richard C. Bostwick , Earl R. Verbeek

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Ultraviolet Light and Fluorescent Minerals as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This book takes a broad look at the hobby of mineral fluorescence. It offers discussions of the major fluorescent minerals and mineral groups, techniques for collection them either on field trips or through trade and purchase, and the many ways fluorescent minerals can be displayed and enjoyed in the home. Fluorescent minerals present a puzzle. Many are of quite ordinary appearance in daylight, but when placed under the invisible rays of an ultraviolet lamp in a darkened room, they suddenly glow in beautiful colors. The transformation is so marked and so mysteriously compelling that many people instantly wish to learn…


Book cover of Volcanic Worlds: Exploring The Solar System's Volcanoes

James R. Zimbelman Author Of The Volcanoes of Mars

From my list on amazing volcanoes.

Why am I passionate about this?

I am a senior geologist emeritus (retired in 2020) whose research focused on volcanic features on Mars, Venus, and the Moon, particularly very long lava flows. I enjoy studying features on Earth in order to improve our understanding of similar features on other planets (also including the study of sand dunes). I worked for more than 32 years at the National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., which allowed me to do scientific research while also presenting the wonder of planetary geology to public audiences throughout the U.S. and in several countries across the world.

James' book list on amazing volcanoes

James R. Zimbelman Why did James love this book?

I recommend this book to anyone who asks me about volcanoes. It is a concise, easy-to-read account of the major volcanic revelations that have resulted from the robotic spacecraft exploration throughout the solar system.

The book is filled with exquisite photographs and logically organized chapters. Eleven chapters describe volcanic features both on Earth as well as many other worlds in our solar system. Each chapter is written well by an expert on each particular subject (and interestingly, all of the authors are women).

By Rosaly M.C. Lopes, Tracy K. P. Gregg,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Volcanic Worlds as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Written by active research scientists who study the volcanism of Earth and of other planets, the contributions provide the first general review of volcanic activity throughout the Solar System. Successive chapters describe past and present volcanic activity as it is observed throughout the Solar System. These chapters relate to readers not only our present knowledge of volcanism throughout the Solar System but also how frontline scientists working in this field conduct their research.


Book cover of Notes from Deep Time: A Journey Through Our Past and Future Worlds

Charlotte Mullins Author Of A Little History of Art

From my list on the British landscape.

Why am I passionate about this?

I grew up in Yorkshire and spent many happy hours as a teenager wandering about the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, looking at giant Henry Moores in the rolling landscape. I subsequently trained as an art historian and have spent the last thirty years writing about art, from the YBAs to our prehistoric roots. A Little History of Art was borne out of this journey. Increasingly I have been drawn to researching what art can tell us about British history. My bookshelves groan with monographs but these five volumes have helped me think more deeply about Britain’s landscapes and its past. I hope they will do the same for you.

Charlotte's book list on the British landscape

Charlotte Mullins Why did Charlotte love this book?

This book expanded how I thought about time and about the landscape we take for granted.

It opened up the prehistoric world from a contemporary perspective, showing how a sense of deep geological time can help us understand our own place in the world better today.

Gordon explains why categories of things can be useful in deepening our understanding of a place: as she says, ‘a named landscape thickens.’

I also found this book so useful in working out how to cram 100,000 years of history into one volume for my book!

By Helen Gordon,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Notes from Deep Time as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

'Astounding ... To call this a "history" does not do justice to Helen Gordon's ambition'
Simon Ings, Daily Telegraph

'Awe-inspiring ... She has imbued geological tales with a beauty and humanity'
Shaoni Bhattacharya-Woodward, Mail on Sunday

The story of the Earth is written into our landscape: it's there in the curves of hills, the colours of stone, surprising eruptions of vegetation. Wanting a fresh perspective on her own life, the writer Helen Gordon set out to read that epic narrative.

Her odyssey takes her from the secret fossils of London to the 3-billion-year-old rocks of the Scottish Highlands, and from…


Book cover of Understanding Earth

Robert M. Hazen Author Of The Story of Earth: The First 4.5 Billion Years, from Stardust to Living Planet

From my list on planet Earth.

Why am I passionate about this?

Robert M. Hazen, Senior Staff Scientist at the Carnegie Institution of Washington’s Earth and Planets Laboratory and the Clarence Robinson Professor of Earth Science at George Mason University, received the B.S. and S.M. in geology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Ph.D. at Harvard University in Earth science. His most recent book is The Story of Earth: The First 4.5 Billion Years from Stardust to Living Planet, which explores the intricate coevolution of the geosphere and biosphere.

Robert's book list on planet Earth

Robert M. Hazen Why did Robert love this book?

At their very best, textbooks synthesize knowledge in new, informative ways. Understanding Earth is a classic, covering the basics of geology, geophysics, and environmental science with stylish prose, classy illustrations, and the insights of two great scientist educators (earlier editions were championed by Frank Press and Ray Siever, who began the franchise). It’s a whirlwind tour of modern science, from the microscopic view of rocks and minerals to the global sweep of plate tectonics.

By Frank Press, Raymond Siever, Tom Jordan , John Grotzinger

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Understanding Earth as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The field of physical geology continues to evolve with new tools, new ideas new approaches. Working closely with Frank Press and Ray Siever, the new co-authors of the fourth edition, John Grotzinger and Tom Jordan, have introduced a wealth of more recent data and applications to keep the science in the text on the cutting edge. This introductory physical geology textbook aims to help students understand what physical geology teaches us about the world and what it brings to our lives. It is designed to bring the worldview of the working geologist to an audience not only new to this…


Book cover of The Tantrum That Saved the World

Julie Dunlap Author Of I Begin with Spring: The Life and Seasons of Henry David Thoreau

From my list on children's books about the climate crisis that won’t scare their socks off.

Why am I passionate about this?

As a biology professor, I communicate frankly with adults about climate change, trusting them to comprehend the accelerating crisis. As a mom of Millennials, I channeled worries about their coping with wildfires, droughts, and extinctions into editing an anthology of young adults’ climate essays. Grandchildren posed a new worry: how should climate realities be introduced to the newest generation? My attempt at that task is a biography of Thoreau, focusing on his 1850s nature observations that ecologists now use to assess 21st-century climate shifts. Luckily, other children’s book writers also offer stories, memoirs, and other approaches to inform without alarming young readers; the best inspire determination to craft a better future.

Julie's book list on children's books about the climate crisis that won’t scare their socks off

Julie Dunlap Why did Julie love this book?

What happens when a cartoonist-television writer and a distinguished earth science professor team up to write about climate change? To me, the result is pure synergy.

Rollicking watercolors and humor-leavened text make hard climate truths accessible and empowering. Yes, the once-climate-unaware protagonist suffers at first as she learns about drought, species endangerment, and other perils accelerating our way.

But knowledge truly is power for the determined heroine, who personifies the kind of persistence and resilience we will all need in the coming decades. She doesn’t claim to have all the answers but insists that together we can find them.

Book cover of The Disenchanted Earth: Reflections on Ecosocialism and Barbarism

Gareth Dale Author Of Revolutionary Rehearsals in the Neoliberal Age

From my list on Degrowth from a fellow traveller.

Why am I passionate about this?

When I grew up I assumed growth is good. Tomatoes grow, so do people—and economies too? Certainly, recessions were bad: many workers were made ‘redundant’. But as we grew older we noticed that growth continued yet people’s lives were getting harder. Looking back, the 1970s in Britain appears a golden age: almost everyone had plenty to eat, society was relatively equal, and all to a soundtrack of fabulous music. With climate change and other environmental threats it’s getting more obvious with each passing season that a global social transformation is required. These are the questions that have driven my own research, on climate politics, growth ideology, and technology fetishism.

Gareth's book list on Degrowth from a fellow traveller

Gareth Dale Why did Gareth love this book?

Humans are destroying the planet on which they live. Their economic system is exterminating thousands of species and they themselves will be at risk of species suicide if they carry on this way much longer. I am constantly pinching myself at how little this is registering among intellectuals and the wider public. Thank goodness for Richard Seymour.

By Richard Seymour,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Disenchanted Earth as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

From Richard Seymour, one of the UK's leading public intellectuals, comes a characteristic blend of forensic insight and analysis, personal journey, and a vivid respect for the natural world.

A planetary fever-dream. An environmental awakening that is also a sleep-walking, unsteadily weaving between history, earth science, psychoanalysis, evolution, biology, art and politics. A search for transcendence, beyond the illusory eternal present.

These essays chronicle the kindling of ecological consciousness in a confessed ignoramus. They track the first enchantment of the author, his striving to comprehend the coming catastrophe, and his attempt to formulate a new global sensibility in which we…


Book cover of The Mediterranean was a Desert: A Voyage of the Glomar Challenger

Graham Shields Author Of Born of Ice and Fire: How Glaciers and Volcanoes (with a Pinch of Salt) Drove Animal Evolution

From my list on science in action written by scientists.

Why am I passionate about this?

I am a scientist who has worked at the coal face of the debate around the origin of animals and ‘Snowball Earth’ his entire career, using a combination of experimental and descriptive science. Over three decades, I have witnessed first-hand how careful attention to detail in study after study has removed doubt from once provocative, even crazy, ideas that are now widely accepted. I love reading popular science from the perspective of the hands-on scientist who has witnessed the debate first-hand and contributed to received knowledge by conceiving new experiments, amassing data, and, more than often, in entirely unexpected ways through sheer curiosity.

Graham's book list on science in action written by scientists

Graham Shields Why did Graham love this book?

This book inspired my love of science.

I think that more than any other book I have read on geology, this one expresses best the excitement one feels when a group of scientists work together on one puzzle only to discover something entirely unexpected and even more astounding.

It is a racy account, littered with personal anecdotes of the major players, but it also describes the heady days when plate tectonics was developing from outrageous hypothesis to acknowledged fact. 

By Kenneth Jinghwa Hsu,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Mediterranean was a Desert as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The famous geological research ship Glomar Challenger was a radically new instrument that revolutionized earth science in the same sense that the cyclotron revolutionized nuclear physics, and its deep-sea drilling voyages, conducted from 1968 through 1983, were some of the great scientific adventures of our time. Beginning with the vessel's first cruises, which lent support to the idea of continental drift, the Challenger played a key part in the widely publicized plate-tectonics revolution and its challenge to more conventional theories. Here the leading oceanographer and earth scientist Kenneth Hs offers an intensely personal account of the experiences of the ship's…


Book cover of Collecting Fluorescent Minerals

Christina Brodie Author Of Drawing and Painting Plants

From my list on fashion, art and science.

Why am I passionate about this?

I am a somewhat eclectic personality, who has studied both arts (fashion, illustration) and sciences (geology, chemistry) alike. I hope that in the book choices I have made - using my love of words, appreciation of fine books, and natural discernment - the reader will find a degree of excellence; as well as surprise and delight, at the discovery of titles they may not even have thought of! 

Christina's book list on fashion, art and science

Christina Brodie Why did Christina love this book?

This book has been criticized for not including enough different locations of fluorescent minerals (which, here, are centred mainly around North America and Greenland), but personally, I think it is enough to make a start - it all depends where we are on, in our journey! 

Myself, I’m most stunned by the amazing photographs, which occupy a large portion of the book - showing various minerals under UV light (which, incidentally, is not the “UV light” that we know from parties) in a completely different context. This world is all around us, and yet most of us make no attempt to even know it. Has anyone done tours of underground caves under these lighting conditions, yet? And, if not, why not?

By Stuart Schneider,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Collecting Fluorescent Minerals as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Seeing fluorescent minerals up close for the first time is an exciting experience. The colors are so pure and the glow is so seemingly unnatural, that it is hard to believe they are natural rocks. Hundreds of glowing minerals are shown, including Aragonite, Celestine, Feldspar, Microcline, Picropharmacolite, Quartz, Spinel, Smithsonite, plus many more. But don't let the hard-to-pronounce names keep you away. Over 870 beautiful color photographs illustrate how fluorescent minerals look under UV light and in daylight, making this an invaluable field guide. Here are minerals from the United States, including mines in New Jersey, New York, Arizona, and…


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