10 books like The History of Last Night's Dream

By Rodger Kamenetz,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like The History of Last Night's Dream. Shepherd is a community of 7,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Dreams and Healing

By John A. Sanford,

Book cover of Dreams and Healing: A Succinct and Lively Interpretation of Dreams

This book establishes that throughout history and cultures, dreams have been seen as essential tools in healing mental, physical, and social problems. While many dreams may be “housekeeping” or processing the day’s events, the author persuades that dreams come for a purpose. The author provides in-depth case studies of dreams that transform the lives of dreamers. Dreams offer direction toward finding your own path against collective expectations. One of the case studies in the book shows how dreams guide a 20-year-old college student to make decisions his parents didn’t approve of. Another is a case study of a woman whose dreams guide her to go back to get a college degree late in life.

Dreams and Healing

By John A. Sanford,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Dreams and Healing as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Dreams and Healing: A Succinct and Lively Interpretation of Dreams by John A. Sanford


The Dreammaker's Apprentice

By Arnold Mindell,

Book cover of The Dreammaker's Apprentice: Using Heightened States of Consciousness to Interpret Dreams

This book broadens the understanding of dream interpretation to include the Aboriginal Australian’s idea of Dreamtime. The “dreammaker” is the creator of both waking life and the source of nighttime dreams. The author Arnold Mindell blends ideas of dreamtime, quantum physics, and Jungian psychology to interpret life events, body symptoms as well as mental health problems. The breakthrough idea here is that the dreammaker can also be found in waking life and can be interpreted even at the micro-level of what he calls flirts. These are quickly passing life experiences that catch our eye - from a momentary pain, to an uncanny emotion or a bizarre personal encounter. He helps the reader to see all of these as expressions of dreamtime and offers tools for interpreting both these “flirts” and nighttime dreams.

The Dreammaker's Apprentice

By Arnold Mindell,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Dreammaker's Apprentice as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Psychotherapist Arnold Mindell goes deeper than ever before in his exploration of dreamwork as a tool for heightened perception and self improvement.


Dream Work

By Jeremy Taylor,

Book cover of Dream Work: Techniques for Discovering the Creative Power in Dreams

I picked Dream Work because it is “one-stop shopping” meaning it is a comprehensive and thorough review of many different approaches to dream interpretation. I particularly like the quick tips he offers if you don’t want to delve into theory. For example, he recommends you create a title for a dream which is effective in increasing your insight quickly. He also has guidance for working with fragments of dreams and offers a powerful case study of how one small dream fragment of remembering “pastel” colors opened up a new career direction for a dreamer. While many dreamers find dream fragments to be frustrating he shows how these can be condensed and edited “telegrams.” Other quick tips he offers are asking questions about a dream such as “What might happen if I did this in the real world?”

Dream Work

By Jeremy Taylor,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Dream Work as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Offers an invaluable tool for the exploration of the inner life contained within our dreams and individual, group,and community techniques for discovering more of the multiple meanings inherent in every dream. With extensive, annotated bibliography.


Knock Knock Dream Journal

By Knock Knock,

Book cover of Knock Knock Dream Journal

I included this book because the most important part of dream interpretation is recording your dreams. This journal has space for your to write a title for the dream as recommended in the previous book Dream Work. In addition to writing out the dream, there are boxes to check off the category of dream – from a nightmare to mundane - and a checklist to note the prevailing emotion. There is space to draw images from the dream and a section to reflect and try an interpretation. You can use any of these features and the journal, by offering space and checkboxes, deepens engagement with the dream, and may offer directions you wouldn’t have thought of by yourself.

Knock Knock Dream Journal

By Knock Knock,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Knock Knock Dream Journal as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Perplexed by inappropriate, recurring, or just-plain confusing dreams? Make friends with your subconscious-and its head-scratching contents! Cheaper and considerably less nosy than a shrink, this bedside analyst offers an easy format for recording your psyche's odd nocturnal missions and interpreting their significance. Because sometimes a cigar is just a cigar-but not usually.


The Psychology of Dreaming

By Josie Malinowski,

Book cover of The Psychology of Dreaming

This book, written by an actual dream researcher, presents a smart and easy-to-read introduction to the psychology of dreams. Covering topics like the history of dreaming, how dreams are scientifically studied, how to work with dreams for personal insight, the possible functions of dreams, lucid dreaming, nightmares, and what the future of dream research may hold, Malinowski does a commendable job of introducing the reader to a wealth of information about dreams. Complete with personal examples, eye-opening insights, and a thoughtful discussion of ethical questions surrounding emerging dream-related technologies, this delightful book is sure to please those looking for an engaging introduction to dreams.

The Psychology of Dreaming

By Josie Malinowski,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Psychology of Dreaming as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Why do we dream? What is the connection between our dreams and our mental health? Can we teach ourselves to have lucid dreams?

The Psychology of Dreaming delves into the last 100 years of dream research to provide a thought-provoking introduction to what happens in our minds when we sleep. It looks at the role that dreaming plays in memory, problem-solving, and processing emotions, examines how trauma affects dreaming, and explores how we can use our dreams to understand ourselves better. Exploring extraordinary experiences like lucid dreaming, precognitive dreams, and sleep paralysis nightmares, alongside cutting-edge questions like whether it will…


Dreams And How To Guide Them

By Léon d'Hervey de Saint-Denys,

Book cover of Dreams And How To Guide Them: Practical Observations

Have you ever wondered what happens to our mind as we fall asleep? Or whether we can experience things in dreams that we never experienced in waking life? Jean Marie Léon d’Hervey de Saint-Denys tackled these and other questions like them in his remarkable 1867 book, Dreams and How to Guide Them. Saint-Denys used his finely-honed skills as a lucid dreamer (knowing that you are dreaming while still in the dream) to investigate dreams from within, exploring their images, memory sources, and inner logic as they unfolded before (or, rather, behind) his eyes. More amazing still, some 150 years later, many of his Saint-Denys’s ideas can still be found in modern clinical and scientific theories of dreams. 

Dreams And How To Guide Them

By Léon d'Hervey de Saint-Denys,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Dreams And How To Guide Them as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Hervey de Saint-Denys (Marie-Jean-Léon, Marquis d'Hervey de Saint Denys) published this book in 1867, and since then it has become one of the forerunners of the study of lucid dreaming.

This is one of the few 19th century works that has lost none of its freshness or usefulness with the passage of time, due to the author's entirely practical foundation.

In the second part of this work, devoted mainly to a history of professed views on sleep and dreams from antiquity to modern times, the author expounds his own ideas, based on numerous practical observations, supporting with ample evidence his…


The Snowman

By Raymond Briggs,

Book cover of The Snowman

This has it all. Every time I see the cover I think of the house where I grew up and I can picture the scene in the lounge on Christmas morning where I’m sorting the presents into piles for when my grandparents arrive, while watching this on BBC2. One year I got given it as a book, and it was a different experience to read it, but just as lovely.

The Snowman

By Raymond Briggs,

Why should I read it?

4 authors picked The Snowman as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

An activity book based on the animated film of Raymond Briggs' The Snowman. Children of all ages will enjoy exploring the fun and excitement of Christmas with this festive book packed with things to do and make.


The Marrow Thieves

By Cherie Dimaline,

Book cover of The Marrow Thieves

I get chills from some dystopian novels as easily as I do from books about the dead. In The Marrow Thieves, Native people are hunted by the Canadian government for their marrow, which contains the ability to dream—an ability that has faded as the human population has died off and the land has become uninhabitable in a not-too-distant future. The protagonist, Frenchie survives in the woods with a group of Indigenous people, learning some of his history and language from its members. Here, the at-the-edge-of-my-seat fear comes from the Recruiters—always just steps behind Frenchie, lurking in the trees or disguised as friends. 

The Marrow Thieves

By Cherie Dimaline,

Why should I read it?

4 authors picked The Marrow Thieves as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Humanity has nearly destroyed its world through global warming, but now an even greater evil lurks. The indigenous people of North America are being hunted and harvested for their bone marrow, which carries the key to recovering something the rest of the population has lost: the ability to dream. In this dark world, Frenchie and his companions struggle to survive as they make their way up north to the old lands. For now, survival means staying hidden-but what they don't know is that one of them holds the secret to defeating the marrow thieves.

"Miigwans is a true hero; in…


The Art of Dreaming

By Carlos Castaneda,

Book cover of The Art of Dreaming

This book, like the previous one, is written by an anthropologist, and it describes the author’s experiences of learning dreaming techniques from a Toltec sorcerer. In that tradition, there are seven Gates of Dreaming, obstacles to be overcome if you want to achieve greater dream awareness and control, and the book looks at four of them. It’s thought-provoking but easy reading because it takes the form of a story, rather than a series of essays, and I enjoyed trying some of the ideas in my own dream practice.

The Art of Dreaming

By Carlos Castaneda,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Art of Dreaming as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Bestselling author Carlos Castaneda introduces readers to the worlds that exist within their dreams.


The Lathe of Heaven

By Ursula K. Le Guin,

Book cover of The Lathe of Heaven

This is a book about the power of dreams. What would you do if you realized that whatever you dreamt became reality when you woke up? And what would you do if you had the power to control that dreamer? Like so many of LeGuin’s amazing novels, this one is both pure entertainment and a deeply thoughtful exploration of the consequences of power (as well as some fascinating thoughts about what an ideal world might look like). I find the concept of responsibility as it relates to power super intriguing, and I appreciate how using “magical” elements to explore the concept adds a purity to a conversation that could otherwise get bogged down in politics. (Plus it’s way more fun.)

The Lathe of Heaven

By Ursula K. Le Guin,

Why should I read it?

5 authors picked The Lathe of Heaven as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

'Her worlds have a magic sheen . . . She moulds them into dimensions we can only just sense. She is unique. She is legend' THE TIMES

'Le Guin is a writer of phenomenal power' OBSERVER

George Orr is a mild and unremarkable man who finds the world a less than pleasant place to live: seven billion people jostle for living space and food. But George dreams dreams which do in fact change reality - and he has no means of controlling this extraordinary power.

Psychiatrist Dr William Haber offers to help. At first sceptical of George's powers, he comes…


5 book lists we think you will like!

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