10 books like NPR

By Michael McCauley,

Here are 10 books that authors have personally recommended if you like NPR. Shepherd is a community of 7,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Made Possible By...

By James Ledbetter,

Book cover of Made Possible By...: The Death of Public Broadcasting in the United States

For a critical look at the financial structure of public broadcasting and its intricacies as and after it became a powerhouse, Ledbetter's book can't be beat. I just wish he'd update it! Few people understand how public radio in particular is financed. Having written a book about the great philanthropist Joan Kroc and her landmark gift to NPR when she died, I found this book particularly illuminating. Anyone who gives to the pledge drives should read this.

Made Possible By...

By James Ledbetter,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Made Possible By... as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Made Possible By...is an engrossing history of public broadcasting, from its initial idealist attempt to reshape the vast wasteland of television, to its current lamentable state - safe, consistently mediocre, and as dependent on corporate financing as its commercial counterparts.


Listener Supported

By Jack W. Mitchell,

Book cover of Listener Supported: The Culture and History of Public Radio

Mitchell was the first person hired by NPR when it was first charted in 1970. He was appointed its first producer after the first initial, scattered year of production of its first news program, All Things Considered, which debuted in May, 1971. This is an excellent survey of the early years from the perch of a behind-the-scenes insider and offers to clues about how the network developed.

Listener Supported

By Jack W. Mitchell,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Listener Supported as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Public radio stands as a valued national institution, one whose fans and listeners actively support it with their time and their money. In this new history of this important aspect of American culture, author Jack W. Mitchell looks at the dreams that inspired those who created it, the all-too- human realities that grew out of those dreams, and the criticism they incurred from both sides of the political spectrum. As National Public Radio's very first employee, and the first producer of its legendary All Things Considered, Mitchell tells the story of public radio from the point of view of an…


Talk

By Susan Stamberg,

Book cover of Talk: NPR's Susan Stamberg Considers All Things

Stamberg is a pioneer broadcaster, whom Mitchell appointed to host a nightly newscast and as someone who worked in public radio back when it was called "educational broadcasting." Read this book of annotated transcripts of some of her best interviews and see why she got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for putting public radio on the proverbial map. Bonus: Linda Wertheimer's Listening to America, derived from her years as host of ATC, and long-time Morning Edition host Bob Edwards’ memoir, A Life in the Box.

Talk

By Susan Stamberg,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Talk as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


This Is NPR

By Ari Shapiro, David Folkenflik, Susan Stamberg, Cokie Roberts, Noah Adams, John Ydstie, Renee Montagne

Book cover of This Is NPR: The First Forty Years

NPR turns fifty this year, but this book offers a survey of its first forty years. Though it was produced by the network itself, it's relatively devoid of unbridled boosterism, and offers a fair and fun look behind the scenes of what has become a beloved and respected network heard each day by millions.

This Is NPR

By Ari Shapiro, David Folkenflik, Susan Stamberg, Cokie Roberts, Noah Adams, John Ydstie, Renee Montagne

Why should I read it?

1 author picked This Is NPR as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Funny, moving, and comprehensive, this beautiful volume is the ultimate gift for the NPR fan, packed with transcripts, photos, and contributions from the most famous and beloved contributors from throughout the organization's 40-year history. The chapters, organized by decade, are wirtten by some of the most beloved NPR hosts: Foreword - Cokie Roberts Introduction - Susan Stamberg 1970's - Noah Adams 1980's - John Ydstie 1990's - Renee Montagne 2000's - Ari Shapiro Epilogue: David Folkenflik Sidebar material appreas throughout the book froma who's who of NPR corespondants and guest contributors: Steve Inskeep, Peter Sagal, Ira Glass, David Sedaris, Neal…


The Ex Talk

By Rachel Lynn Solomon,

Book cover of The Ex Talk

One of my favorite things about this book was its setting in the workplace environment of public radio and how much I learned about what goes on behind the scenes of their call-in shows!

Heroine Shay is a producer who dreams of being a host. She gets her chance when her boss likes her idea about doing a show with two exes who talk about relationships. Too bad the co-host assigned to Shay is her booth-hogging co-worker, Dominic, and they have to pretend like they used to date.

Shay and Dominic’s on-air repartee is so much fun I wished The Ex Talk was a real show I could listen to! The progression of their relationship from enemies to friends to more and how it affects their jobs makes for a real page-turner.

The Ex Talk

By Rachel Lynn Solomon,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Ex Talk as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

An Instant Indie Bestseller

Public radio co-hosts navigate mixed signals in Rachel Lynn Solomon's sparkling romantic comedy debut.
 
Shay Goldstein has been a producer at her Seattle public radio station for nearly a decade, and she can't imagine working anywhere else. But lately it's been a constant clash between her and her newest colleague, Dominic Yun, who's fresh off a journalism master's program and convinced he knows everything about public radio. 
 
When the struggling station needs a new concept, Shay proposes a show that her boss green-lights with excitement. On The Ex Talk, two exes will deliver relationship advice live,…


Homeward Bound

By Elaine Tyler May,

Book cover of Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era

I am recommending this book because Elaine Tyler May offered one of the earliest analyses of gender and sex tied directly to the dictates and needs of political culture. She insightfully delineates “domestic containment,” a component of Cold War culture which paralleled the foreign policy initiative to contain communism and nuclear arms throughout the world. But in this case the sphere of influence was the home. By excavating Cold War culture (for example, Life Magazine’s coverage of a couple honeymooning in a bomb shelter) and some fascinating longitudinal data May demonstrates the way domestic containment sought to keep women and men in their proscribed domestic roles, and she reveals the difficulty many families had living up to the ideal.  Her history illuminates our long-lasting nostalgia for the “traditional” family and remains so relevant today.

Homeward Bound

By Elaine Tyler May,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Homeward Bound as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

When Homeward Bound first appeared in 1988, it forever changed the way we understand Cold War America. Previously, scholars understood the post-World War II era as a time when Americans turned away from politics to enjoy the fruits of peace and prosperity after decades of depression and war, while their leaders remained preoccupied with the Soviet threat and the dangers of the Atomic Age. Homeward Bound challenged the idea of an apolitical private arena, demonstrating that the Atomic Age and the Cold War were not merely the concerns of experts and policy makers, but infused American life on every level,…


The $10 Trillion Opportunity

By Richard E. Jackim, Peter G. Christman,

Book cover of The $10 Trillion Opportunity: Designing Successful Exit Strategies for Middle Market Business Owners

I don’t know Richard Jackim, but Peter Christman is the founder of EPI, and this book is often described as “Where exit planning for business owners began.” It was the first to outline exit planning as a process that requires a team. It discusses tax and legal strategies, coordinating with estate planning, and developing a plan for due diligence. Written mostly for advisors, the focus is on the M&A process for middle market companies, but no list of exit planning books would be complete without it.

The $10 Trillion Opportunity

By Richard E. Jackim, Peter G. Christman,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The $10 Trillion Opportunity as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The $10 Trillion Opportunity shows business advisors how to develop comprehensive, integrated exit plans for business owners. With the baby boomer generation approaching retirement age, exit planning has become one of the hottest topics for business advisors. Exit planning is a process that asks and answers all of the personal, business, financial, legal, estate and tax issues involved in selling or exiting from a privately held business. The $10 Trillion Opportunity is a logically structured book with a no-nonsense approach to exploring and addressing a topic that is often misunderstood and at times overwhelming for business owners and their advisors…


Rust Belt Boy

By Paul Hertneky,

Book cover of Rust Belt Boy: Stories of an American Childhood

This was one of the first of many childhood and youth memoirs I read while writing my book. The author, Paul Hertneky, had a similar experience to mine in a larger immigrant-filled steel mill town, Ambridge, Pennsylvania. It’s an entertaining story of how he almost became a permanent resident, working in the mill like his father, but finally escaped this industrially-polluted environment, as I did. My hometown also had many newly-arrived immigrants and, at one time, I was also thinking of following in my father’s footsteps. The big difference is that my hometown never became part of the rust belt, although its deep water wells had to be closed down. It grew in size and the chemical factory, which once produced DDT and Agent Orange, remains in place today, very close to houses, but with more environmental controls. Still, the parallels between our two stories are interesting. 

Rust Belt Boy

By Paul Hertneky,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Rust Belt Boy as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

These stories are specific to one legendary riverfront plateau and one boy's journey, but are emblematic of immigrant life and blue-collar aspirations during the heyday of American industry and its crash, foreshadowing one of the largest internal migrations in U.S. history. Approximately six million baby boomers, like the narrator, fled the Rust Belt. Another six million remained and stories of their youth, struggles, and aspirations echo throughout this book. Pittsburgh alone attracts die-hard affinity with its scattered natives.


What Retirees Want

By Ken Dychtwald,

Book cover of What Retirees Want: A Holistic View of Life's Third Age

I like authors who back up statements with research. Ken Dychtwald, CEO of Age Wave, has been studying the Boomer generation for more than three decades, and uses his research to not only demonstrate how this generation has transformed retirement, but also provides important insights for those who work with, sell to, or are Boomers themselves. Virtually every page has a nugget of useful and applicable information.

What Retirees Want

By Ken Dychtwald,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked What Retirees Want as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

"Dychtwald and Morison offer a brilliant and convincing perspective: an essential re-think of what 'aging' and 'retirement' mean today and an invitation to help mobilize the best in the tidal wave of Boomer Third Agers."
-Daniel Goleman, PhD, Author, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ

Throughout 99 percent of human history, life expectancy at birth was less than 18 years. Few people had a chance to age. Today, thanks to extraordinary medical, demographic, and economic shifts, most of us expect to live long lives. Consequently, the world is witnessing a powerful new version of retirement, driven by…


The Art of Dying Well

By Katy Butler,

Book cover of The Art of Dying Well: A Practical Guide to a Good End of Life

This book was helpful for me to navigate the finale of my parent’s lives. But The Art of Dying Well isn't just about one's parents. Many baby boomers are unprepared for dealing with their own aging. I suggest reading it well before you need it. Knowledge is power, and Butler's book gave me the gift of learning more now, while things are relatively calm. A crisis visit to an ER isn't the time to cram in education and research. You may need to be an advocate for yourself or someone you love sooner than later. I have suggested the book to my siblings and friends, which will hopefully lead to meaningful conversation and planning to support each other through our elder years. I am grateful for Butler's practical guide, which is filled with wisdom and resources. I anticipate referring to it again and again as I age. 

The Art of Dying Well

By Katy Butler,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Art of Dying Well as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This "comforting...thoughtful" (The Washington Post) guide to maintaining a high quality of life-from resilient old age to the first inklings of a serious illness to the final breath-by the New York Times bestselling author of Knocking on Heaven's Door is a "roadmap to the end that combines medical, practical, and spiritual guidance" (The Boston Globe).

"A common sense path to define what a 'good' death looks like" (USA TODAY), The Art of Dying Well is about living as well as possible for as long as possible and adapting successfully to change. Packed with extraordinarily helpful insights and inspiring true stories,…


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