The best books to prove the apocalypse can still be fun

Why am I passionate about this?

I have a passion for the written word and the art of storytelling. Though I’m not a fatalist, I’ve had a lifelong interest in stories and films about cataclysm and apocalyptic tales, regardless of scale. Films like Poseidon’s Adventure, The Towering Inferno, and all of the both good and bad zombie movies the years have produced were mainstays in my childhood. Seeing how ordinary people responded to extraordinary circumstances to overcome and sometimes succumb to their frailties have been driving influences for me. I try to reflect that point of view through the characters in my novels. I think those moments have a way of defining our own humanity.


I wrote...

Infection: Alaskan Undead Apocalypse

By Sean Schubert,

Book cover of Infection: Alaskan Undead Apocalypse

What is my book about?

When calamity strikes, and the only two land routes out of Anchorage are cut, the city becomes a trap. The sleepy, unsuspecting residents of Alaska’s largest city become tragically aware of this fact when an ancient plague is unleashed in their midst.

My book follows groups of survivors that include men, women, and children who struggle to retain both their lives and their humanity in the face of what could be the end of the world at the cold, ruthless hands of the undead.

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The books I picked & why

Book cover of The Stupidest Angel

Sean Schubert Why did I love this book?

The Stupidest Angel is a fun Christmas romp complete with zombies, murder, and mayhem. The best part about this book is that Moore revisits one of the craziest places ever imagined: Pine Cove, CA. A little Night of the Living Dead with a little Our Town, and every B-movie with a hot babe wielding a sword, Moore twisted several elements into a crazed train wreck that starts at a sprint and never lets up. I enjoy how he entwines characters and plotlines of Pine Cove with those from his other novels, creating a universe in which all of his gems coexist and interact regardless of their themes or even their time in history. Looking for a Christmas story that won’t be like any other you’ve read; The Stupidest Angel won’t disappoint.

By Christopher Moore,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Stupidest Angel as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Twas the night (okay, more like the week) before Christmas and little Joshua Barker is in desperate need of a Christmas miracle. Josh is sure he saw Santa take a shovel to the head and now the seven-year-old has only one prayer: Please Santa, come back from the dead! But coming to Earth, seeking a small child whose wish needs granting, is none other than Archangel Raziel. Unfortunately, he's not sporting the brightest halo in the bunch and before you can say 'Kris Kringle,' he's botched his sacred mission and sent the residents of Pine Cove headlong into Christmas chaos,…


Book cover of Cat's Cradle

Sean Schubert Why did I love this book?

Vonnegut was a master storyteller whose dim view of the world and its human inhabitants was informed by his experience as a WWII POW in Dresden, Germany and enduring the deadly firebombing of the city at war’s end. Cat’s Cradle, like all of his novels, is a critical portrayal of the human condition as depicted by his characters which often are more important than the actual story. Ice-Nine, in the wrong or perhaps the right hands, has the potential to end all existence on earth. Vonnegut, through his characters, debates what the right course should be.

By Kurt Vonnegut,

Why should I read it?

9 authors picked Cat's Cradle as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

One of America's greatest writers gives us his unique perspective on our fears of nuclear annihilation

Experiment.

Told with deadpan humour and bitter irony, Kurt Vonnegut's cult tale of global destruction preys on our deepest fears of witnessing Armageddon and, worse still, surviving it.

Solution.

Dr Felix Hoenikker, one of the founding fathers of the atomic bomb, has left a deadly legacy to the world. For he is the inventor of ice-nine, a lethal chemical capable of freezing the entire planet. The search for its whereabouts leads to Hoenikker's three eccentric children, to a crazed dictator in the Caribbean, to…


Book cover of The Plague

Sean Schubert Why did I love this book?

Credited as an early existentialist despite his own objections to the label, Albert Camus’ The Plague is a quintessential example of an existentialist’s view of human behaviour and the willingness to accept the responsibility for one’s action or inaction. Set in Oran, Algeria shortly after the end of WWII, The Plague tells the story of a population quarantined from the world due to a deadly outbreak of bubonic plagues. Camus examines human responses to calamity when limits are stressed and then broken through isolation and loss. His characters are a motley assemblage of public servants, clergy, and simple people who assume disparate roles that are sometimes admirable and sometimes despicable—just like in real life.

By Albert Camus,

Why should I read it?

9 authors picked The Plague as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

“Its relevance lashes you across the face.” —Stephen Metcalf, The Los Angeles Times • “A redemptive book, one that wills the reader to believe, even in a time of despair.” —Roger Lowenstein, The Washington Post 

A haunting tale of human resilience and hope in the face of unrelieved horror, Albert Camus' iconic novel about an epidemic ravaging the people of a North African coastal town is a classic of twentieth-century literature. 

The townspeople of Oran are in the grip of a deadly plague, which condemns its victims to a swift and horrifying death. Fear, isolation and claustrophobia follow as they…


Book cover of Zeus is Undead

Sean Schubert Why did I love this book?

Zeus is Undead is a sequel to the playful Zeus is Dead and is equally as clever and entertaining. I’m a sucker for great story-telling and building a narrative around the history of Greek myths got my attention. In the previous story, Zeus’ death meant his longstanding order of maintaining distance and no interference between the gods and the world of the mortals evaporated, leading to fun mischief and the introduction of gods, demi-gods, and mythic monsters into our modern world. Zeus is Undead goes further by adding zombies into the mix. Just a lot of fun.

By Michael G. Munz,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Zeus is Undead as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Outstanding Humor Novel: 2019 IAN Book of the Year Awards
Gold Medalist: 2019 Readers' Favorite Book Awards Sometimes all a fallen goddess needs to regain her power is a trusty sword and a worldwide zombie apocalypse...

Athena’s had a rough eighteen months. Formerly goddess of wisdom, battle, and crafts, her divinity has been revoked. Zeus no longer trusts her, and a 7-foot ice cream sundae now holds her honored position as his bodyguard. Yet when the dead start rising from the grave without authorization, things start looking up. What better way to prove her worth to Zeus than to solve…


Book cover of The Raven's Gift

Sean Schubert Why did I love this book?

Don Reardon crafts a tale of utter isolation and deprivation. Set in a remote Alaskan village that is suddenly and remorselessly struck with a virulent and deadly strain of influenza or some other similar malady. Quarantined from the rest of Alaska and the world, most of the inhabitants die from the illness leaving the survivors the grim, brutal task of surviving by whatever means possible. With no food coming into the village and winter firmly set upon them, living or dying becomes a question of what people are willing to do for and to one another.

By Don Rearden,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Raven's Gift as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

John Morgan and his wife can barely contain their excitement upon arriving as the new teachers in a Yup’ik village on the windswept Alaskan tundra. Lured north in search of adventure, the couple hope to immerse themselves in the ancient Arctic culture. But their move proves disastrous when a deadly epidemic strikes and the isolated community descends into total chaos. When outside help fails to arrive, John’s only hope lies in escaping the snow covered tundra and the hunger of the other survivors by making the thousand-mile trek across the Alaskan wilderness for help. Along the way, he encounters a…


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Let Evening Come

By Yvonne Osborne,

Book cover of Let Evening Come

Yvonne Osborne Author Of Let Evening Come

New book alert!

Why am I passionate about this?

I grew up on a family farm surrounded by larger vegetable and dairy operations that used migrant labor. From an early age, my siblings and I were acquainted with the children of these workers, children whom we shared a school desk with one day and were gone the next. On summer vacations, our parents hauled us around in a station wagon with a popup camper, which they parked in out-of-the-way hayfields and on mountainous plateaus, shunning, much to our chagrin, normal campgrounds, and swimming pools. Thus, I grew up exposed to different cultures and environments. My writing reflects my parents’ curiosity, love of books and travel, and devotion to the natural world. 

Yvonne's book list on immersive coming-of-age fiction with characters struggling to find themselves amidst the isolation and bigotry in Indigenous, rural, and minority communities

What is my book about?

After her mother is killed in a rare Northern Michigan tornado, Sadie Wixom is left with only her father and grandfather to guide her through young adulthood. Miles away in western Saskatchewan, Stefan Montegrand and his Indigenous family are displaced from their land by multinational energy companies. They are taken in temporarily by Sadie’s aunt, a human rights activist who heads a cultural exchange program.

Stefan promptly runs afoul of local authority, but Sadie, intrigued by him and captivated by his story, has grown sympathetic to his cause and complicit in his pushback against prejudiced accusations. Their mutual attraction is stymied when Stefan’s older brother, Joachim, who stayed behind, becomes embroiled in the resistance, and Stefan is compelled to return to Canada. Sadie, concerned for his safety, impulsively follows on a trajectory doomed by cultural misunderstanding and oncoming winter.

Let Evening Come

By Yvonne Osborne,

What is this book about?

After her mother is killed in a rare Northern Michigan tornado, Sadie Wixom is left with only her father and grandfather to guide her through the pitfalls of young adulthood.
Hundreds of miles away in western Saskatchewan, Stefan Montegrand and his Indigenous family are forced off their land by multinational energy companies and flawed treaties. They are taken in temporarily by Sadie's aunt, a human rights activist who heads a cultural exchange program.
Stefan, whose own father died in prison while on a hunger strike, promptly runs afoul of local authority, but Sadie, intrigued by him and captivated by his…


5 book lists we think you will like!

Interested in plagues, Zeus, and Alaska?

10,000+ authors have recommended their favorite books and what they love about them. Browse their picks for the best books about plagues, Zeus, and Alaska.

Plagues Explore 49 books about plagues
Zeus Explore 6 books about Zeus
Alaska Explore 97 books about Alaska