17 books directly related to Scotland Yard 📚

All 17 Scotland Yard books as recommended by authors and experts. Updated weekly.

A Bitter Feast

By Deborah Crombie,

Book cover of A Bitter Feast

Why this book?

When I think of the classic mysteries of the Golden Age, I automatically picture an English country house. In Deborah Crombie’s A Bitter Feast, Scotland Yard Detective Superintendent Duncan Kincaid and his wife, Detective Inspector Gemma James, are invited for a fall getaway at Beck House a country estate in the Cotswolds. When a posh charity luncheon catered by brilliant young chef Viv Holland turns deadly, Duncan and Gemma are pulled into the investigation. While I enjoyed the masterful unfolding of the investigation and the fascinating behind-the-scenes look into a high-end restaurant kitchen, it was the iconic setting that hooked me. Worthy of Miss Marple herself.

A Bitter Feast

By Deborah Crombie,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked A Bitter Feast as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

"Crombie’s characters are rich, emotionally textured, fully human. They are the remarkable creations of a remarkable writer."—Louise Penny

“Nobody writes the modern English mystery the way Deborah Crombie does—and A Bitter Feast is the latest in a series that is gripping, enthralling, and just plain the best.”   — Charles Todd, New York Times bestselling author of The Black Ascot and A Cruel Deception

New York Times bestselling author Deborah Crombie returns with a mesmerizing entry in her “excellent” (Miami Herald) series, in which Scotland Yard detectives Duncan Kincaid and Gemma James are pulled into a dangerous web of secrets, lies,…


The Wolfman

By Jonathan Maberry,

Book cover of The Wolfman

Why this book?

I saw the 2010 movie first and then later found the book version in a thrift store and had to grab it. Both book and movie deftly create a gloomy, gothic, Romantic atmosphere; the book develops the characters and relationships further. It’s the age-old story of a man seeking to rid himself of a curse, pursued by the law and betrayed by someone who was supposed to protect him—I’m a sucker for that kind of tale! If you enjoy the classics like Dracula and Frankenstein, but find it harder to get through them or connect with them emotionally because of the older language and style, give this book a try.

The Wolfman

By Jonathan Maberry,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Wolfman as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Inspired by the Universal Pictures' classic horror film, "The Wolfman" tells the story of Lawrence Talbot, a man haunted by dark, disturbing memories. When his brother mysteriously disappears, Talbot returns to the village of his childhood to investigate. In the process he discovers both a terrifying secret about men cursed as werewolves and the truth about this tortured past. This movie tie-in edition is written by Bram Stoker Award-winning author Jonathan Maberry ("Patient Zero"). The film is directed by Joe Johnston Oscar(copyright)-winning director of "Jumanji", "October Sky", and "Jurassic Park III", and will star Oscar(copyright)-winning actors Benicio Del Toro and…

Book cover of Rotherham Murders: A Half-Century of Serious Crime, 1900-1950

Why this book?

I investigated the murder of Irene Hart after I found an account of the crime in this anthology of murders. I was horrified to see that there had been an apparent miscarriage of justice with the wrong man being hanged. I researched the case and wrote my first book. Margaret’s book is very special to me as it started my career as a true crime writer. Although this is an anthology of crimes committed in the author’s home town they could have happened anywhere. The motives and reasons for murder are the same everywhere: greed, jealousy, sex, envy, or just a purely evil soul. Excellent book by an author who had a weekly true crime column in the local paper.

Rotherham Murders: A Half-Century of Serious Crime, 1900-1950

By Margaret Drinkall,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Rotherham Murders as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Rotherham Murders - True Crime BooksSet in a social backdrop of recovery from two world wars, Margaret Drinkall's Rotherham Murders concentrates on killings that took place in and around the town during the first fifty years of the twentieth century. Most of her cases have not been written about in recent years, but are now investigated and told by a modern crime historian. Read about the brutal death of a policeman, a sensational 'body in a trunk' murder which resulted in Scotland Yard detectives coming to Rotherham and the very first wireless appeal for helping catching the culprit. Other sad…

Book cover of The Inspector and Mrs. Jeffries

Why this book?

If you love underdog stories, this one offers a double helping. First, Inspector Witherspoon’s career is threatened by ambitious and unscrupulous men who want to see him fail. Secondly, his household staff are the real heroes, tracking down clues that they cleverly feed to their unsuspecting employer to help him solve murder cases. Each staff member has unique methods for uncovering information, and together they make an effective team. I chuckle at their close calls as they scramble to hide their secret sleuthing from the inspector and the rest of the police force.  

This first novel gives the backstory: what’s at stake for the inspector and his household, plus why his housekeeper (Mrs. Jeffries) is a plausible and capable sleuth.

The Inspector and Mrs. Jeffries

By Emily Brightwell,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Inspector and Mrs. Jeffries as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This charming series of Victorian murder mysteries features mild-mannered Inspector Witherspoon of Scotland Yard and, more importantly, Mrs Jeffries, his housekeeper. A policeman's widow herself, her quick wits allow her to nudge the Inspector in the right direction to solve the crime.

When a doctor is discovered dead in his own office, Mrs Jeffries is on the look-out for a prescription for murder, determined to discover the culprit, despite how her employer feels about interviewing suspects . . . "He hated questioning people. He could never tell whether or not someone was actually lying to him, and he knew, shocking…


Book cover of The Case of the Famished Parson

Why this book?

I first discovered the Inspector Littlejohn stories by George Bellairs when I briefly lived on the Isle of Man. Littlejohn has a dry sense of humour and a sharp tongue. In this story he is called in to investigate the death of a bishop whose emaciated body has been found at the bottom of the cliff at Cape Marvin. Little is known about the bishop and it is up to the inspector to discover if the answer to his death can be found in his past or in the secretive village of Cape Marvin.

The Case of the Famished Parson

By George Bellairs,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Case of the Famished Parson as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A corpse belonging to a gentle bishop is found at the base of a cliff on the Isle of Man in an ingenious mystery by the master of the (The New York Times).
Dr James Macintosh, the Bishop of Greyle, is a mysterious man; for a long time, nobody even seems to know his last name. But things suddenly take a turn for the worse when his body is found completely emaciated and battered having being pushed face-first off the edge of a cliff...
Inspector Littlejohn faces an incredibly peculiar case and must figure out how to explain the savage…

Book cover of Memoirs of a Bow Street Runner

Why this book?

Before the Metropolitan Police (popularly known as Scotland Yard) existed, the Bow Street Runners were in charge of criminal investigation in Britain. Henry Goddard, the brilliant and incisive Runner, employed Sherlockian techniques years before the first Sherlock Holmes story was published. In later years, as a private detective, he continued to investigate and solve famous and complex crimes-He traveled widely, pursuing suspects through the Middle East, Europe, and Australia all of which he vividly describes.

In his old age, he dictated these memoirs, which give us a detailed account of his methods, and how he found "The Man With the Hidden Limp" and how he proved "The Butler Really Did It." It also makes clear how many errors of fact crept into later accounts of these famous crimes. Anyone with an interest in early criminal history will find this fascinating.

Memoirs of a Bow Street Runner

By Henry Goddard,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Memoirs of a Bow Street Runner as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

During the Regency and early Victorian eras, Henry Goddard, one of the last of the Bow Street Runners, chased criminals in London and through out the Kingdom, and around the globe; to France, Australia, New York, the Wild West; and made private enquiries for the King of England.
Born in 1800 in London, he was employed at Bow Street in London as a Patrol Constable from 1824 until he was promoted to be a Runner in 1827 and he remained a Runner until the Bow Street Runners were disbanded in 1839, and he became a private detective.
He wrote his…

Book cover of The Man with a Load of Mischief

Why this book?

One of the biggest joys in this fine series is the pub settings. Each title is the name of a pub and each pub is the sort of spot you'd like to settle comfortably down with a drink and a chat with friends. Add onto this backdrop a puzzling murder, the wonderful Scotland Yard inspector Richard Jury, and his aristocratic sidekick Melrose Plant, and you've got a winning formula from Martha Grimes.

The Man with a Load of Mischief

By Martha Grimes,

Why should I read it?

3 authors picked The Man with a Load of Mischief as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

At the Man with a Load of Mischief, they found the dead body stuck in a keg of beer. At the Jack and Hammer, another body was stuck out on the beam of the pub’s sign, replacing the mechanical man who kept the time. Two pubs. Two murders. One Scotland Yard inspector called in to help. Detective Chief Inspector Richard Jury arrives in Long Piddleton and finds everyone in the postcard village looking outside of town for the killer. Except for one Melrose Plant. A keen observer of human nature, he points Jury in the right direction: into the darkest…

The Daughter of Time

By Josephine Tey,

Book cover of The Daughter of Time

Why this book?

Tey’s fictional detective, Alan Grant, takes a revisionist view of the villainy, immortalized by Shakespeare, of Richard III. Grant is laid up in bed and decides to plumb history for a case; in other words, this is a kind of literary Rear Window. As someone who has taught Richard III many times, I found it to be a refreshing shift in my understanding of the character.

The Daughter of Time

By Josephine Tey,

Why should I read it?

7 authors picked The Daughter of Time as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

_________________________
Josephine Tey's classic novel about Richard III, the hunchback king whose skeleton was famously discovered in a council car park, investigates his role in the death of his nephews, the princes in the Tower, and his own death at the Battle of Bosworth.

Richard III reigned for only two years, and for centuries he was villified as the hunch-backed wicked uncle, murderer of the princes in the Tower. Josephine Tey's novel The Daughter of Time is an investigation into the real facts behind the last Plantagenet king's reign, and an attempt to right what many believe to be the…


Book cover of The Beekeeper's Apprentice: Or, on the Segregation of the Queen

Why this book?

Fifteen-year-old, gawky, recently orphaned, Mary Russell meets Sherlock Holmes the afternoon she nearly steps on him on the Sussex Downs when he’s about to commit a crime against himself. Brilliant, Mary’s intellect captures Holmes’ interest immediately, and thus begins a markedly odd, if singularly fruitful, partnership between the two. She, an eventual Oxford student in Theology; he, the Consulting Detective of Scotland Yard, and sometime agent provocateur in Her Majesty’s Service via his beloved brother, Mycroft. Mary is smart as a whip, a singularly apt pupil, and unbeknownst to Holmes, finds a place for herself deep in his heart. For her part, she is enrapt and en-irked with Holmes by turns, growing into an elegant co-protagonist by hook, crook, bolt-hole, and disguise. They are enchanting together.

The Beekeeper's Apprentice: Or, on the Segregation of the Queen

By Laurie R. King,

Why should I read it?

3 authors picked The Beekeeper's Apprentice as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In 1915, Sherlock Holmes is retired and quietly engaged in the study of honeybees when a young woman literally stumbles into him on the Sussex Downs. Fifteen years old, gawky, egotistical, and recently orphaned, the young Mary Russell displays an intellect to impress even Sherlock Holmes--and match him wit for wit. Under his reluctant tutelage, this very modern twentieth-century woman proves a deft protegee and a fitting partner for the Victorian detective. But even in their first case together, the pair face a truly cunning adversary who will stop at nothing to put an end to their partnership.

A Great Deliverance

By Elizabeth George,

Book cover of A Great Deliverance

Why this book?

This is the first book in George’s twenty-one book series featuring Scotland Yard Inspector Thomas Lynley, the eighth earl of Asherton, and Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers, a commoner.

When I read A Great Deliverance, I fell in love with George’s beautiful writing, found her two characters fascinating, and adored the cast of characters supporting the detectives. Plus, the book is unusual because the reader knows from the start who the killer is and the investigation focuses on why she killed him.

When I sat down to write my first ever fiction, Linley and Havers were the inspiration for my two detectives, NYPD Detectives Chiara Corelli and P.J. Parker. And I learned from George that the characters are as important, if not more important, than the plot. She inspired my writing.

A Great Deliverance

By Elizabeth George,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Great Deliverance as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Fat, unlovely Roberta Teys is found beside her father's headless corpse, wearing her best dress and with an axe in her lap. Her first words are: 'I did it. And I am not sorry' and she refuses to say more. Inspector Thomas Lynley and DS Barbara Havers are sent by Scotland Yard to solve this particularly gruesome murder. And as they navigate their way around a dark labyrinth of secret scandals and appalling crimes, they uncover a series of shocking revelations that shatter the facade of the peaceful Yorkshire village.

A Share in Death

By Deborah Crombie,

Book cover of A Share in Death

Why this book?

As a writer I look to Crombie’s Constable Duncan Kincaid/Sergeant Gemma James series for guidance on how to have your characters grow professionally and personally, to age and experience the kind of changes people go through in real life. I recommend book one of the nineteen in the series, A Share in Death, because it sets up the relationship between the two detectives.

A Share in Death

By Deborah Crombie,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Share in Death as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In this “thoroughly entertaining mystery with a cleverly conceived and well-executed plot” (Booklist), Edgar Award-nominated author Deborah Crombie introduces us to Duncan Kincaid of Scotland Yard and his partner, Gemma James.

A week's holiday in a luxurious Yorkshire time-share is just what Scotland Yard's Superintendent Duncan Kincaid needs. But the discovery of a body floating in the whirlpool bath ends Kincaid's vacation before it's begun. One of his new acquaintances at Followdale House is dead; another is a killer. Despite a distinct lack of cooperation from the local constabulary, Kincaid's keen sense of duty won't allow him to ignore the…

The Last Kashmiri Rose

By Barbara Cleverly,

Book cover of The Last Kashmiri Rose

Why this book?

 The Last Kashmiri Rose: Murder and Mystery in the Final Days of the Raj is the first of Barbara Cleverly’s 13 Joe Sandilands mysteries. In March of 1922, Sandilands’ return to Scotland Yard from Calcutta is delayed by Bengal’s governor, who sends him to a military post where his niece Nancy’s husband is Controller. Nancy’s best friend has committed suicide, according to the local police. But Nancy has learned that since 1911, four other officers’ wives have died in peculiarly violent circumstances. After Sandilands’ investigation uncovers a series of murders, he looks for the murderer amidst tea parties, dances, picnics, and dinners. The portrait of Anglo-Indian society, in which every need is supplied by socially invisible native servants, is excellent.

The Last Kashmiri Rose

By Barbara Cleverly,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Last Kashmiri Rose as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

India 1922. In Panikhat, 50 miles from Calcutta, the wives of officers in the Bengal Greys have been dying violently, one every year and each in March. All the deaths are bizarre and appear to be accidental. The only link between them is the bunch of small red roses that appear on the women's graves on the anniversary of their deaths. In order to help solve these mysterious deaths, the Governor of Bengal calls on the reluctant help of Joe Sandilands, Scotland Yard detective and war hero who happens to be on secondment to the Bengal police. Joe learns that…

Book cover of Cover Her Face: An Adam Dalgliesh Mystery

Why this book?

This is another murder mystery set in a quintessential English village and where we meet detective Adam Dalgleish for the first time. The day after the church fete, Sally Jupp is found dead in her bedroom, the door locked from the inside. I loved the way tension gradually builds through the story and how expertly each character is drawn. Nobody is who they seem, including the victim.

Cover Her Face: An Adam Dalgliesh Mystery

By P. D. James,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Cover Her Face as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The first in the series of scintillating mysteries to feature cunning Scotland Yard detective, Adam Dalgliesh from P.D. James, the bestselling author hailed by People magazine as “the greatest living mystery writer.”

Sally Jupp was a sly and sensuous young woman who used her body and her brains to make her way up the social ladder. Now she lies across her bed with dark bruises from a strangler’s fingers forever marring her lily-white throat. Someone has decided that the wages of sin should be death...and it is up to Chief Inspector Adam Dalgliesh to find who that someone is.

Cover…

Book cover of The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher: A Shocking Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective

Why this book?

This riveting book covers the gruesome discovery of a murder in a Georgian house in the sleepy village of Road in Wiltshire. That someone has died is awful enough but realising that the murderer is a member of the household brings fresh horrors. The author meticulously follows the crime and subsequent investigation, sticking strictly to the facts while using her imagination to recreate the tense atmosphere while bringing the characters to life. Unputdownable.

The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher: A Shocking Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective

By Kate Summerscale,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

_______________ WINNER OF THE SAMUEL JOHNSON PRIZE FOR NON-FICTION THE NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER A RICHARD AND JUDY BOOK CLUB PICK _______________ 'A remarkable achievement' - Sunday Times 'A classic, to my mind, of the finest documentary writing' - John le Carre 'Absolutely riveting' - Sarah Waters, Guardian _______________ On a summer's morning in 1860, the Kent family awakes in their elegant Wiltshire home to a terrible discovery; their youngest son has been brutally murdered. When celebrated detective Jack Whicher is summoned from Scotland Yard he faces the unenviable task of identifying the killer - when the grieving family are the…

Book cover of Death at Wentwater Court: The First Daisy Dalrymple Mystery

Why this book?

Daisy has solved 23 murder mysteries so far. These Christie-esque plots are set in London, at posh country estates, and in other parts of the British landscape. Daisy works as a journalist—an unusual job for a young woman in the ‘20s, especially one who is aristocratic and wealthy and, therefore, shouldn’t be working at all. Her assignments and social connections inevitably entangle her in murder investigations, which she solves with the help of a competent Scotland Yard inspector who in later books becomes her husband. 

Death at Wentwater Court: The First Daisy Dalrymple Mystery

By Carola Dunn,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Death at Wentwater Court as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

No stranger to sprawling country estates, well-heeled Daisy Dalrymple is breaking new ground at Wentwater Court to cover a story for Town & Country magazine. But her interview gives way to interrogation when suave Lord Stephen Astwick meets a chilly end on the tranquil skating pond.

With evidence that his death was anything but accidental, Daisy joins forces with Scotland Yard so the culprit can't slip through their fingers like the unfortunate Astwick slipped through the ice ...

Praise for The Daisy Dalrymple Mysteries:

'Appropriate historical detail and witty dialogue are the finishing touches on this engaging 1920s period piece.'…


Book cover of The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare

Why this book?

If Lewis’ Till We Have Faces is a deeply buried metaphor for religious experience, The Man Who Was Thursday requires an excavator to unearth. Both books explain their metaphors in the final pages, but Thursday does this much less clearly. Unless you’re pretty familiar with Christianity, you’re probably gonna miss it. But what a wonderful surprise to get to the end of this strange story and realize that Chesterton was sneakily describing the sneakiness of God’s beauty, just like Lewis did.

The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare

By G.K. Chesterton,

Why should I read it?

4 authors picked The Man Who Was Thursday as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Can you trust yourself when you don't know who you are? Syme uses his new acquaintance to go undercover in Europe's Central Anarchist Council and infiltrate their deadly mission, even managing to have himself voted to the position of 'Thursday'. In a park in London, secret policeman Gabriel Syme strikes up a conversation with an anarchist. Sworn to do his duty, When Syme discovers another undercover policeman on the Council, however, he starts to question his role in their operations. And as a desperate chase across Europe begins, his confusion grows, as well as his confidence in his ability to…

Book cover of Murder on the Flying Scotsman: A Daisy Dalrymple Mystery

Why this book?

Another British mystery by a British author, this one with Carola Dunn’s resourceful and determined sleuth, the Honorable Daisy Dalrymple, who sleuths in the 1920s, when England is just recovering from the Great War. Daisy makes a living writing magazine articles but she keeps stumbling over dead bodies, much to the chagrin of Scotland Yard’s Detective Inspector Alec Fletcher. In this book, early in the series, Daisy boards the Flying Scotsman, heading from London to Edinburgh. Then Belinda Fletcher shows up. The detective’s daughter is on the lam from her difficult grandmother. Then someone gets murdered on the train and Daisy once again finds herself a suspect and reluctant sleuth.

Murder on the Flying Scotsman: A Daisy Dalrymple Mystery

By Carola Dunn,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Murder on the Flying Scotsman as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Daisy's in danger of heading off the rails!

Daisy's embarking on a journey to Edinburgh and her biggest worry is that she has forgotten her book, so how will she pass the time? Her concern proves to be pointless, however, as once the journey begins Daisy finds a pint-sized stowaway on board - Belinda, the daughter of dreamy Detective Chief Inspector Alec Fletcher, Daisy's beau.

No sooner has this problem revealed itself than Daisy and Belinda run into a bickering Scottish clan en route to the deathbed of the head of the family. But before the express reaches its first…