The best M/M books for asexuals

Jude Tresswell Author Of A Right To Know (County Durham Quad)
By Jude Tresswell

Who am I?

I chose the ‘Best’ title with trepidation: there are many sorts of aces and reading tastes will differ. I’m a cis-gender female, sex averse, verging on sex-repulsed. So, why M/M? Firstly, because reading about other females is too much like being involved myself. Secondly, because I’m het-romantic so I like my MCs to be male. And sex? I can take sex on the page as long as it isn’t gratuitous; it must be meaningful. I’ve chosen five very different books, but they all have gay protagonists and they meet my ace-based needs. In case it’s an issue, I’ve commented on the flame count.   


I wrote...

A Right To Know (County Durham Quad)

By Jude Tresswell,

Book cover of A Right To Know (County Durham Quad)

What is my book about?

A story that draws on my experience of parental suicide, ancestry testing, and ace/non-ace relationships. 

The County Durham Quad are Mike, Ross, Raith, and Phil, four gay, polyamorous men who live in North East England. They solve crimes, aided by their friend, Nick, who is asexual and an ex-detective. In this tale, Phil is dismayed to learn that he has an eighteen-year-old son, Lewis, conceived through sperm donation. The man that Lewis has always called ‘Dad’ has died. Was his death suicide or was he murdered? Lewis wants Phil to find out. The investigation uncovers armed robbery, industrial espionage, and the truth, but success is costly. Feelings of jealousy, anger, regret, and fears of abandonment must all be faced up to and dealt with.

The books I picked & why

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Some Kind of Love

By Jack Dickson,

Book cover of Some Kind of Love

Why this book?

This final book in the Jas Anderson trilogy sees Jas investigating a murder and a case of police corruption, but there is so much more: sectarian rivalry, harsh city life, a grieving mother, a revengeful wife, suffering children, and my two favourite gay protagonists, Jas himself and the ever-unstable Stevie. There’s a lot of testosterone on show. Explicit sex abounds, but it is never included for effect. It’s born of need and, sometimes, love. It never repels me. The conversation is in Glasgow dialect. Please don’t let that deter you: this story is powerful. Last pages count, and Some Kind of Love has a perfect ending.

Some Kind of Love

By Jack Dickson,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Some Kind of Love as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The Front Runner

By Patricia Nell Warren,

Book cover of The Front Runner

Why this book?

A tale of three American athletes and their coach, all gay, and told from the POV of the coach. Included because, to me, it is a piece of queer fiction history. It was published in the seventies pre the nationwide legalisation of gay sex in the United States. Gay friends have told me how important it was for them to read The Front Runner back then. It’s all about the validation that arises from seeing people like oneself in print, as aces know. There’s nothing on the page to worry aces. The only worrying thing is that sportspeople still have homophobia to contend with.

The Front Runner

By Patricia Nell Warren,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Front Runner as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


The Cricketer's Arms: A Clyde Smith Mystery

By Garrick Jones,

Book cover of The Cricketer's Arms: A Clyde Smith Mystery

Why this book?

Another crime story. It’s a lengthy tale that, because so many men and partnerships are involved, made me work hard, but the intriguing plot is character-driven, which I like. The setting is fifties Australia. I’m English and I admit that I tend to forget about the huge part played in the Second World War by Australian, New Zealand, and Canadian troops, aka ANZAC. What links Jones’ gay protagonists is their military background. I felt that I learnt something and that pleased me. Nothing on the page to worry aces.

The Cricketer's Arms: A Clyde Smith Mystery

By Garrick Jones,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Cricketer's Arms as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


Pictures of Perfection

By Reginald Hill,

Book cover of Pictures of Perfection

Why this book?

I very much doubt that Reginald Hill intended Pictures of Perfection to appear on a Best M/M list! It’s a quintessentially English tale with a backdrop of class-based snobbery and the threat to rural life from development. It’s also the sole book in Hill’s Dalziel and Pascoe mystery series wherein Hill’s gay detective sergeant, Edgar Wield, takes centre stage. Wield finds more than a missing policeman when he’s sent to the village of Enscombe! Nothing to worry even the most sex-repulsed asexual here although, with hindsight, these stories can seem problematic in other ways: Dalziel is so non-woke. However, it was being a fan of Wield and Hill’s books that got me writing my own gay mysteries, so I’m ever grateful.

Pictures of Perfection

By Reginald Hill,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Pictures of Perfection as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

For suspense, ingenuity and sheer comic effrontery this takes the absolute, appetizing biscuit' Sunday Times

High in the Mid-Yorkshire Dales stands the traditional village of Enscombe, seemingly untouched by the modern world. But contemporary life is about to intrude when the disappearance of a policeman brings Detective Superintendent Andy Dalziel and DCI Peter Pascoe to its doors.

As the detectives dig beneath the veneer of idyllic village life a new pattern emerges: of family feuds, ancient injuries, cheating and lies. And finally, as the community gathers for the traditional Squire's Reckoning, it looks as if the simmering tensions will erupt…


How to Be a Movie Star

By TJ Klune,

Book cover of How to Be a Movie Star

Why this book?

Finally, a story that’s M/M and has an asexual character. It isn’t easy to write ace M/M protagonists. For obvious reasons, some of the tropes are excluded. However, TJ Klune gets around this, perhaps because the man who wants to be a movie star, Josiah (Josy) Erickson, is probably demisexual and demiromantic. That is, sex and romance aren’t impossible for Josy, but he needs a lengthy emotional connection with another man before he desires either. The story is funny, charming, touching, and validates people who don’t see enough of themselves in print. 

How to Be a Movie Star

By TJ Klune,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked How to Be a Movie Star as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.


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