88 books like Foundation ActionScript 3.0 Animation

By Keith Peters,

Here are 88 books that Foundation ActionScript 3.0 Animation fans have personally recommended if you like Foundation ActionScript 3.0 Animation. Shepherd is a community of 10,000+ authors and super readers sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Book cover of Getting Started with p5.js: Making Interactive Graphics in JavaScript and Processing

Scott Murray Author Of Unstuck: Javascript

From my list on learning how to code interactive graphics.

Why am I passionate about this?

I’ve been making web pages since the World Wide Web began in the mid-1990s. Back then, the web was visually quite sparse. It wasn’t until the late 2000s that new browser capabilities let the web get visually interesting and an exciting place for interactive graphics. Graphics are great: they can be informational (like charts and maps) or purely aesthetic. My personal journey of learning to code interactive graphics has been so rewarding that I’ve shared the love with others through teaching creative coding workshops and undergraduate courses. If you’re new to coding or computer graphics, I hope you’ll give one of these books a try!

Scott's book list on learning how to code interactive graphics

Scott Murray Why did Scott love this book?

If I were getting started with coding graphics today, I would start with this book, hands down. Learning p5 is the easiest way to create interactive graphics that run in a web browser, and this book is a very friendly, accessible, and beautifully illustrated introduction to coding graphics with p5.js—no prior experience needed. You might be wondering about the name “p5.js”. It’s a JavaScript library (that’s the “.js” part) based on Processing, the open-source programming language created for artists and designers. (More on Processing in a moment.) I have taught college courses with this book, and students love it. Plus, all the skills you learn here with p5 are applicable to JavaScript—the world’s most popular programming language—more generally.

By Lauren McCarthy, Casey Reas, Ben Fry

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Getting Started with p5.js as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Processing opened up the world of programming to artists, designers, educators, and beginners. The p5.js JavaScript implementation of Processing reinterprets it for today's web. This short book gently introduces the core concepts of computer programming and working with Processing. Written by the co-founders of the Processing project, Reas and Fry, along with Lauren McCarthy, one of the minds behind p5.js, Getting Started with Processing gets you in on the fun!


Book cover of Aesthetic Programming: A Handbook of Software Studies

Scott Murray Author Of Unstuck: Javascript

From my list on learning how to code interactive graphics.

Why am I passionate about this?

I’ve been making web pages since the World Wide Web began in the mid-1990s. Back then, the web was visually quite sparse. It wasn’t until the late 2000s that new browser capabilities let the web get visually interesting and an exciting place for interactive graphics. Graphics are great: they can be informational (like charts and maps) or purely aesthetic. My personal journey of learning to code interactive graphics has been so rewarding that I’ve shared the love with others through teaching creative coding workshops and undergraduate courses. If you’re new to coding or computer graphics, I hope you’ll give one of these books a try!

Scott's book list on learning how to code interactive graphics

Scott Murray Why did Scott love this book?

I love this book so much. It is a bit less “how-to” and a bit more “why in the world are we interested in programming and what does that mean for us as individuals and also for society at large?” That is to say, you can learn to code from this book—in JavaScript with p5.js, specifically—but Aesthetic Programming is not merely about learning to code; it’s also a provocative, critical exploration of code as a medium for thought, communication, and creative expression. When you code, you’re participating in the creation of “computational culture.” With this book by your side, you will be a more self-aware cultural citizen. (Also, this book is visually so, so beautiful. Just leafing through the pages inspires me.)

By Winnie Soon, Geoff Cox,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Aesthetic Programming as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The book explores the technical as well as cultural imaginaries of programming from its insides. It follows the principle that the growing importance of software requires a new kind of cultural thinking - and curriculum - that can account for, and with which to better understand the politics and aesthetics of algorithmic procedures, data processing and abstraction. It takes a particular interest in power relations that are relatively under-acknowledged in technical subjects, concerning class and capitalism, gender and sexuality, as well as race and the legacies of colonialism. This is not only related to the politics of representation but also…


Book cover of Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists

Scott Murray Author Of Unstuck: Javascript

From my list on learning how to code interactive graphics.

Why am I passionate about this?

I’ve been making web pages since the World Wide Web began in the mid-1990s. Back then, the web was visually quite sparse. It wasn’t until the late 2000s that new browser capabilities let the web get visually interesting and an exciting place for interactive graphics. Graphics are great: they can be informational (like charts and maps) or purely aesthetic. My personal journey of learning to code interactive graphics has been so rewarding that I’ve shared the love with others through teaching creative coding workshops and undergraduate courses. If you’re new to coding or computer graphics, I hope you’ll give one of these books a try!

Scott's book list on learning how to code interactive graphics

Scott Murray Why did Scott love this book?

This book changed my life. Known simply as “the blue book” in creative coding circles, I discovered this in a bookstore in Cambridge, Mass., just blocks from where Casey and Ben had created Processing at MIT (and then wrote this book). It opened me up to Processing—their programming language for artists and designers—but also to code as a creative medium. Until then, I saw code as a dry, tedious way to fight with computers. Now I know that code can be just as expressive, engaging, and emotional as prose and poetry.

While the syntax in this book is for Processing (which you can download and run on your computer for free), the concepts are equally applicable to p5.js (which runs in a web browser, also for free).

By Casey Reas, Ben Fry,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Processing as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The new edition of an introduction to computer programming within the context of the visual arts, using the open-source programming language Processing; thoroughly updated throughout.

The visual arts are rapidly changing as media moves into the web, mobile devices, and architecture. When designers and artists learn the basics of writing software, they develop a new form of literacy that enables them to create new media for the present, and to imagine future media that are beyond the capacities of current software tools. This book introduces this new literacy by teaching computer programming within the context of the visual arts. It…


Book cover of The Nature of Code

Scott Murray Author Of Unstuck: Javascript

From my list on learning how to code interactive graphics.

Why am I passionate about this?

I’ve been making web pages since the World Wide Web began in the mid-1990s. Back then, the web was visually quite sparse. It wasn’t until the late 2000s that new browser capabilities let the web get visually interesting and an exciting place for interactive graphics. Graphics are great: they can be informational (like charts and maps) or purely aesthetic. My personal journey of learning to code interactive graphics has been so rewarding that I’ve shared the love with others through teaching creative coding workshops and undergraduate courses. If you’re new to coding or computer graphics, I hope you’ll give one of these books a try!

Scott's book list on learning how to code interactive graphics

Scott Murray Why did Scott love this book?

If you want your interactive graphics to feel like they are real objects—real things moving around on the screen—then you have to learn how to mimic the natural world. For an object to feel like it has weight, you have to mimic gravity. For a flock of birds to feel real, you have to mimic how real birds swarm in the sky. Yes, this does involve little math. But fortunately, Dan is a superstar teacher, and he will gently walk you through (a) the math and (b) how to translate that math into code.

Speaking of code, this book uses Processing.js, which is an older adaptation of original Processing to JavaScript. That said, the techniques are all equally applicable to modern-day Processing and p5.js.

By Daniel Shiffman,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Nature of Code as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

How can we capture the unpredictable evolutionary and emergent properties of nature in software?

How can understanding the mathematical principles behind our physical world help us to create digital worlds?

This book focuses on a range of programming strategies and techniques behind computer simulations of natural systems, from elementary concepts in mathematics and physics to more advanced algorithms that enable sophisticated visual results. Readers will progress from building a basic physics engine to creating intelligent moving objects and complex systems, setting the foundation for further experiments in generative design.

Subjects covered include forces, trigonometry, fractals, cellular automata, self-organization, and genetic…


Book cover of The Science of Programming

Federico Kereki Author Of Mastering JavaScript Functional Programming: Write clean, robust, and maintainable web and server code using functional JavaScript and TypeScript

From my list on the theory and practice of computer programming.

Why am I passionate about this?

I have been working with computers for decades now – having started with programmable handheld calculators and working my way up and down through mainframes, mini- and micro-computers. I always thought there is an art to writing software, and that good software can be read and admired. Maintainability, readability, and testability are some core needs for software, and after going through many programming paradigms, I feel that functional programming (FP) is the way to go – and several modern web frameworks agree. JavaScript (and now, TypeScript) are essential to web development, and I wanted to show how FP could be successfully used with those languages, and thus my book.

Federico's book list on the theory and practice of computer programming

Federico Kereki Why did Federico love this book?

This book is essential in that it follows a systematic and scientific approach to software development, advocating for clarity in expressing algorithms, providing a rigorous framework for designing and reasoning about programs, and, fundamentally, always focusing on formal methods and mathematical techniques to ensure correctness and efficiency in programming code.

Most importantly, the book doesn’t just show you how to prove programs correct, but also teaches how to arrive from a definition to an efficient and correct solution, so I would recommend this to every developer.


By David Gries,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Science of Programming as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Describes basic programming principles and their step-by-
step applications.Numerous examples are included.


Book cover of The Art of Computer Programming: Volume 3: Sorting and Searching

Steven S. Skiena Author Of The Algorithm Design Manual

From my list on mathematical and algorithmic thinking.

Why am I passionate about this?

I am Professor of Computer Science at Stony Brook University, and have spent the past thirty years thinking/teaching/writing about algorithms. Algorithms are the really cool thing about computer science, for they form the ideas behind any interesting computer program. And algorithms turn out to be the ideas behind many interesting aspects of life that have nothing to do with computers. I have written six books on algorithms, programming, gambling, and history –including the ranking of the historical significance of all the people in Wikipedia.

Steven's book list on mathematical and algorithmic thinking

Steven S. Skiena Why did Steven love this book?

Knuth’s unique mix of playfulness and rigor came to define computer science as an intellectual discipline: computer science didn’t really have anything to do with computers, but everything to do with a particular way of seeing the world.  Just browse and wonder at the beauty and precision achieved in these books.   

Volume 3 (Sorting and Searching) is my personal favorite, and I encourage you to start there. During the pandemic, I finally got around to reading Volume 4A (Combinatorial Algorithms), which was published thirty plus years after Volume 3. It was the same feeling I had watching the movie The Phantom Menace years after growing up with the original Star Wars trilogy. I had forgotten just how unique and distinctive Knuth’s Art of Computer Programming is.

By Donald Knuth,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Art of Computer Programming as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The bible of all fundamental algorithms and the work that taught many of today's software developers most of what they know about computer programming.



-Byte, September 1995



I can't begin to tell you how many pleasurable hours of study and recreation they have afforded me! I have pored over them in cars, restaurants, at work, at home... and even at a Little League game when my son wasn't in the line-up.



-Charles Long



If you think you're a really good programmer... read [Knuth's] Art of Computer Programming... You should definitely send me a resume if you can read the whole…


Book cover of The Art of Computer Programming

Federico Kereki Author Of Mastering JavaScript Functional Programming: Write clean, robust, and maintainable web and server code using functional JavaScript and TypeScript

From my list on the theory and practice of computer programming.

Why am I passionate about this?

I have been working with computers for decades now – having started with programmable handheld calculators and working my way up and down through mainframes, mini- and micro-computers. I always thought there is an art to writing software, and that good software can be read and admired. Maintainability, readability, and testability are some core needs for software, and after going through many programming paradigms, I feel that functional programming (FP) is the way to go – and several modern web frameworks agree. JavaScript (and now, TypeScript) are essential to web development, and I wanted to show how FP could be successfully used with those languages, and thus my book.

Federico's book list on the theory and practice of computer programming

Federico Kereki Why did Federico love this book?

This multi-volume book is, for me, a masterpiece that goes far beyond just coding or algorithms or data structures, and serves as a profound exploration of algorithmic thinking and computer science's theoretical foundations, going deeply into the performance of algorithms and the behavior of data structures.

Knuth's meticulous approach, coupled with his clear and engaging prose (with occasional touches of humor) clearly explains complex concepts, and shows a deep understanding of the artistry inherent in solving computational problems.

Bill Gates said that anybody who went through all its volumes would get a job at his company, and I surely agree! I would recommend this book both for novice or seasoned programmers, because you will always find invaluable insights in it.

By Donald Knuth,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Art of Computer Programming as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Check out the boxed set that brings together Volumes 1 - 4B in one elegant case.

The Art of Computer Programming, Volumes 1-4B Boxed Set

ISBN: 9780137935109

Art of Computer Programming, Volume 1, Fascicle 1, The: MMIX -- A RISC Computer for the New Millennium

This multivolume work on the analysis of algorithms has long been recognized as the definitive description of classical computer science. The three complete volumes published to date already comprise a unique and invaluable resource in programming theory and practice. Countless readers have spoken about the profound personal influence of Knuth's writings. Scientists have marveled at…


Book cover of Managing Humans: Biting and Humorous Tales of a Software Engineering Manager

Jaime Buelta Author Of Python Automation Cookbook

From my list on for Python and non-Python developers.

Why am I passionate about this?

Since I was a kid, I’ve been passionate about technology and had a clear vocation to work with computers. I’ve been a developer for more than 20 years now, spending half of them mainly in the Python environment, and I’ve always been interested in improving my skills. While it’s true that software development is a field that changes constantly and technology evolves at great speed, there are some elements that remain relatively unchanged and can be used to compound knowledge and ability. In particular, the elements that are closer to the human element, teamwork, coordination, etc. are quite stable over time.

Jaime's book list on for Python and non-Python developers

Jaime Buelta Why did Jaime love this book?

Michael Lopp, or Rands, as he is commonly known online, has been sharing his knowledge as a software manager for years, mainly through his blog. He is one of the most insightful voices about the art of management in a software environment, and even if you are not a manager yourself (and don’t want to become one), will make you understand and better collaborate with your own manager, and be ready when you need to lead a team or understand how it is to work with other humans.

By Michael Lopp,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Managing Humans as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Managing Humans is a selection of the best essays from Michael Lopp's popular website Rands in Repose(www.randsinrepose.com). Lopp is one of the most sought-after IT managers in Silicon Valley, and draws on his experiences at Apple, Netscape, Symantec, and Borland. This book reveals a variety of different approaches for creating innovative, happy development teams. It covers handling conflict, managing wildly differing personality types, infusing innovation into insane product schedules, and figuring out how to build lasting and useful engineering culture. The essays are biting, hilarious, and always informative.


Book cover of Principles of Compiler Design

David B. Black Author Of Wartime Software

From my list on teaching and inspiring the best programmers.

Why am I passionate about this?

I started programming in high school and wrote software in many domains for 30 years, from the early ARPA-net to massive credit card software. I wrote a FORTRAN compiler with one assistant in a year. I got hassled to do proper project management. Nightmare. It was all about inflated expectations instead of moving fast and winning. Then in 25 years of venture capital investing, I learned from many young companies how the little startups built quickly and well things that giants like Google literally could not get done. This book and my others spell out what I learned from the little guys who beat the giants.

David's book list on teaching and inspiring the best programmers

David B. Black Why did David love this book?

Attending Harvard College gave me the opportunity to collaborate with great programmers in creating the early ARPA-net. But the best course I took was on compiler theory and construction, using an early draft of the material in this book.

Of course I learned how to build a compiler, which I did as my first job after graduating. But more important, I learned that a well-built compiler is a small amount of language-independent code with two major parts.

First the input part that realizes the content of the lexical and grammatical metadata, like today’s LEX and YACC, to turn the program being compiled into a semantic model.

Second the code generator that reads the semantic model and, based on generative model metadata, turns the semantics of the program being compiled to whatever form you want, whether executable code, assembler language, byte code or whatever.

This approach, while indispensable for compilers and…

By Alfred V. Aho, Jeffrey D. Ullman,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Principles of Compiler Design as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Computer science


Book cover of Codex Seraphinianus

Theo Ellsworth Author Of The Understanding Monster - Book One

From my list on to alter your sense of reality.

Why am I passionate about this?

I think of my imagination as a living thing that I have a working, evolving relationship with. I try to access that creative flow state through automatic drawing and something about that process seems to help me in my daily life. I draw every day. I make art zines, comics, fine art, album art, and collaborative works. The books in this list all feel personally important to me and are works I return to and think about often.

Theo's book list on to alter your sense of reality

Theo Ellsworth Why did Theo love this book?

One of the most treasured and unusual books in my personal library. It’s an encyclopedia from another world, entirely written in a made-up language. Page after page of haunting and strange illustrations, organized into specific categories and concepts. Sitting with this book transports me back to the time before I could read, when words felt like incomprehensible symbols. Taking the time to puzzle over this book feels like such a valuable experience. It takes me right out of the familiar ways of taking in information and puts me in a state of mind that has to search and consider the juxtaposition of images and ideas in totally new ways. I can’t recommend this book enough.

By Luigi Serafini,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Codex Seraphinianus as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

An extraordinary and surreal art book, this edition has been redesigned by the author and includes new illustrations. Ever since the Codex Seraphinianus was first published in 1981, the book has been recognized as one of the strangest and most beautiful art books ever made. This visual encyclopedia of an unknown world written in an unknown language has fueled much debate over its meaning. Written for the information age and addressing the import of coding and decoding in genetics, literary criticism, and computer science, the Codex confused, fascinated, and enchanted a generation.

While its message may be unclear, its appeal…


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