The best books on trees to make you cherish and delight in nature and rekindle your relationship with it

Why am I passionate about this?

When my mother, Denise, died aged 43, 17-year-old me arrived back to the place where I’d made mud pies and happy memories that would never be the same again. I climbed my favourite apple tree, between Earth and sky and clung to the trunk. While I crumbled, my tree stood tall, cool – its sturdiness momentarily reassuring. Ever since then the constancy and stability of trees have offered me sanctuary and made me feel grounded and protected. They’ve refreshed and relaxed me; they’ve made me feel connected – to my past, to the present moment and to the natural world. They’ve flooded me with fascination, leading me to learn more about their impact on wellbeing.


I wrote...

Tree Glee: How and Why Trees Make Us Feel Better

By Cheryl Rickman,

Book cover of Tree Glee: How and Why Trees Make Us Feel Better

What is my book about?

Trees clean the air we breathe, fill us with awe on forest walks and provide timber for the houses we live in, yet there are deeper reasons for our arboreal admiration that go beyond utility and beauty. Tree Glee looks at the psychology behind our fascination with trees, examining how they comfort, restore, and revitalise us and what we can learn from the wisdom of woodlands to improve our own well-being. It shares magical stories of remarkable ancient trees across the globe and invites readers to reflect on their own 'treestory'.

Part practical well-being guide and nature-connection manual, and part call to action. Tree Glee explores how by deepening our appreciation and connection to trees and by celebrating and protecting them, we can flourish together.

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The books I picked & why

Book cover of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants

Cheryl Rickman Why did I love this book?

This book touched my soul. Braiding Sweetgrass blends indigenous wisdom, science, and the teachings of plants to teach an important message about rekindling our relationship with the land.

It’s written with such tender knowing that perhaps it should be given to every child and adult in the world. Overflowing with soulful stories that resonate so deeply it could start a kind of revolution in remembering.

Elizabeth Gilbert says this book is 'like a hymn of love to the world,’ It explores how through listening to the lessons plants teach us, we can enable a cycle of reciprocal flourishing - a tender reminder of the damage that's been done, yet a hopeful and encouraging call towards healing the world we share with so many species.

By Robin Wall Kimmerer,

Why should I read it?

47 authors picked Braiding Sweetgrass as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Called the work of "a mesmerizing storyteller with deep compassion and memorable prose" (Publishers Weekly) and the book that, "anyone interested in natural history, botany, protecting nature, or Native American culture will love," by Library Journal, Braiding Sweetgrass is poised to be a classic of nature writing. As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer asks questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces indigenous teachings that consider plants and animals to be our oldest teachers. Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take "us on a journey that is…


Book cover of The Overstory

Cheryl Rickman Why did I love this book?

A remarkable book - not just because it's a novel about trees - but because it is so incredibly well-crafted.

No wonder it won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2019. The Overstory cleverly links the stories of nine strangers in the most mesmerizing way with a focal theme of rekindling our relationship with these majestic marvels of nature.

With a wonderfully woven blend of strikingly good fiction with real-life recent scientific discoveries about trees and their own collaborative strength, The Overstory is properly mind-blowing from start to finish and, frankly, one of the best books ever written!

By Richard Powers,

Why should I read it?

30 authors picked The Overstory as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The Overstory, winner of the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction, is a sweeping, impassioned work of activism and resistance that is also a stunning evocation of-and paean to-the natural world. From the roots to the crown and back to the seeds, Richard Powers's twelfth novel unfolds in concentric rings of interlocking fables that range from antebellum New York to the late twentieth-century Timber Wars of the Pacific Northwest and beyond. There is a world alongside ours-vast, slow, interconnected, resourceful, magnificently inventive, and almost invisible to us. This is the story of a handful of people who learn how to see…


Book cover of The Giving Tree

Cheryl Rickman Why did I love this book?

This book makes you think. Is it about greed? Unconditional love? The relationship between the natural world and humans?

Whatever you get from this book it serves as a reminder about how much trees give us but also flags up the importance of kindness (and balance). Do you balance giving with taking? What could you give more of? Your time? Your love? Your money? Your care? Your voice?

If someone is kind to you, always try to pay it forward? Are you balancing how kind you are to others with how kind you are to yourself? Self-care isn't selfish. Self-care is healthcare. Be kind to yourself and be kind to others. It's possible to do both.

By Shel Silverstein,

Why should I read it?

5 authors picked The Giving Tree as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it. This book is for kids age 4, 5, 6, and 7.

What is this book about?

As recommended by Meghan Markle as the one book she can't wait to share with her child - the timeless fable about the gift of love

Once there was a little tree ... and she loved a little boy.

So begins the classic bestseller, beautifully written and illustrated by the gifted and versatile Shel Silverstein.

Every day the boy would come to the tree to eat her apples, swing from her branches, or slide down her trunk ... and the tree was happy. But as the boy grew older he began to want more from the tree, and the tree…


Book cover of Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest

Cheryl Rickman Why did I love this book?

This is the woman who first discovered the hidden life and secret language of trees (not Peter Wohlleben who later wrote about this topic too). It was ecologist Suzanne Simard who made the discoveries from a lifetime of study after being raised in the forests of British Columbia.

This book is a dazzling scientific detective story from the ecologist who discovered the symbiotic relationship between the mycorrhizal networks of fungi and tree roots and how trees cooperated, healed each other, and remembered. This is her story and the story of her discoveries of trees wisdom and sentience.

She shares how she came to find the mysterious Mother Trees who nurture their kin and keep the forest going.

By Suzanne Simard,

Why should I read it?

14 authors picked Finding the Mother Tree as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

NEW YORK TIMES BEST SELLER • From the world's leading forest ecologist who forever changed how people view trees and their connections to one another and to other living things in the forest—a moving, deeply personal journey of discovery

“Finding the Mother Tree reminds us that the world is a web of stories, connecting us to one another. [The book] carries the stories of trees, fungi, soil and bears--and of a human being listening in on the conversation. The interplay of personal narrative, scientific insights and the amazing revelations about the life of the forest make a compelling story.”—Robin Wall…


Book cover of The Arbornaut: A Life Discovering the Eighth Continent in the Trees Above Us

Cheryl Rickman Why did I love this book?

As much as I love a book about nature, I love books about (and by) badass pioneering women. Meg Lowman is one of these - one of the first-ever tree-top scientists.

It was she who invented one of the first treetop walkways and she shares her amazing story in this book. I love how brave and fearless she was, just climbing hundreds of feet of unchartered territory, solo, into the canopies of Australia's rainforests and how her discoveries literally saved swathes of it.

The book is filled with hope and achievable calls to action as well as her pioneering tale of exploring parts tree that had not yet been explored. A reminder of the importance of trees and also how much those who live in forests matter to their conservation.

By Meg Lowman,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Arbornaut as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

One of the world's first tree-top scientists, Meg Lowman is both a pioneer in her field - she invented one of the first treetop walkways - and a tireless advocate for the planet. In a voice as infectious in its enthusiasm as in its practical optimism, The Arbornaut chronicles her irresistible story.

From climbing solo hundreds of feet into Australia's rainforests to measuring tree growth in the northeastern United States, from searching the redwoods of the Pacific coast for new life to studying leaf-eaters in Scotland's Highlands, from a bioblitz in Malaysia to conservation planning in India to collaborating with…


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Book cover of Act Like an Author, Think Like a Business: Ways to Achieve Financial Literary Success

Joylynn M Ross

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What is my book about?

Act Like an Author, Think Like a Business is for anyone who wants to learn how to make money with their book and make a living as an author. Many authors dive into the literary industry without taking time to learn the business side of being an author, which can hinder book sales and the money that can be made as an author.

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Act Like an Author, Think Like a Business: Ways to Achieve Financial Literary Success

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What is this book about?

Do you want to make money with your book? Do you want to make a living as an author? There’s more to doing so than simply writing and publishing your book. Many authors dive into the literary industry without taking time to learn the business side of being an author. This could dramatically hinder your book sales and the money you can make as an author. Without a guide such as this, mastering the art of financial literary success can take you years, and you’ll be sure to make mistakes during the learning phase. Some mistakes could cost you money;…


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Interested in trees, indigenous peoples, and friendships?

10,000+ authors have recommended their favorite books and what they love about them. Browse their picks for the best books about trees, indigenous peoples, and friendships.

Trees Explore 49 books about trees
Indigenous Peoples Explore 33 books about indigenous peoples
Friendships Explore 1,386 books about friendships