16 books like Monetary Regimes and Inflation

By Peter Bernholz,

Here are 16 books that Monetary Regimes and Inflation fans have personally recommended if you like Monetary Regimes and Inflation. Shepherd is a community of 10,000+ authors and super readers sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Book cover of Money Mischief: Episodes in Monetary History

Max Gillman Author Of The Spectre of Price Inflation

From my list on Walter Bagehot’s challenge.

Why am I passionate about this?

I remember in high school going to the gas pump and filling up during the oil crisis of the 1970s. Inflation was everywhere, but I had no idea what that was. I learned something about this in college and then in Congress as a legislative aide. I remember distinctly a conversation in Congress on how we were going to pay for these huge deficits that arose out of the Reagan tax cuts, all the while when inflation was peaking at that time. I had no idea. I then spent my PhD working in monetary economics to show the effect of inflation on the economy and have not stopped yet.

Max's book list on Walter Bagehot’s challenge

Max Gillman Why did Max love this book?

Friedman, a Nobel-winning former Economics professor, writes brilliantly and playfully, and students of economics love to read him. Yet he delves into the heart of the monetary problems that have been confronted historically. This he uses to shed light on how to conduct monetary policy today.

He ranges across the whole of American history. For example, the failure of the Continental Congress’s currency occurred since it was printed to finance the Revolutionary War when there was no federal government and no federal tax revenue. This led to the new US Constitution and the ability to raise taxes, and a stable currency that was backed by gold and silver.

With the Civil War, the US Treasury printed money called “greenbacks” and suspended conversion to gold and silver during the War, but re-established convertibility in 1879 at the pre-War rate. Friedman shows how this convertibility led to prolonged, hugely damaging deflation for…

By Milton Friedman,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Money Mischief as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

"A lively, enlightening introduction to monetary history…from monetarism's most articulate apostle."—Kirkus Reviews"The Oliver Stone of economics" (Chicago Tribune), Nobel Prize laureate Milton Friedman makes clear once and for all that no one, from the local corner merchant to the Wall Street banker to the president of the United States, is immune from monetary economics. In Money Mischief, Friedman discusses the creation of value: from stones to feathers to gold. He outlines the central role of monetary theory and shows how it can act to ignite or deepen inflation. Through colorful historical episodes, he demonstrates the mischief that can result from…


Book cover of Lombard Street, a Description of the Money Market

Max Gillman Author Of The Spectre of Price Inflation

From my list on Walter Bagehot’s challenge.

Why am I passionate about this?

I remember in high school going to the gas pump and filling up during the oil crisis of the 1970s. Inflation was everywhere, but I had no idea what that was. I learned something about this in college and then in Congress as a legislative aide. I remember distinctly a conversation in Congress on how we were going to pay for these huge deficits that arose out of the Reagan tax cuts, all the while when inflation was peaking at that time. I had no idea. I then spent my PhD working in monetary economics to show the effect of inflation on the economy and have not stopped yet.

Max's book list on Walter Bagehot’s challenge

Max Gillman Why did Max love this book?

Lombard Street is the classic statement of how central banks began functioning to insure the private bank system against bank panics. Walter Bagehot wrote this at the time of a revolution in banking that came about after the Joint Stock Companies Act of 1862 allowed private banks to have limited liability. Banking then boomed in England, and the Bank of England went from being a private bank to a bank also serving the Crown of England, and finally into a central bank as we see them today. 

The Bank of England would hold reserves for the entire private banking system should they need them in times of bank panic, which were periodic in those days (and still today). At the same time, the Bank provided the money supply through note issue. This created a money and banking authority that was efficient in its practice of stabilizing the money and financial…

By Walter Bagehot,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Lombard Street, a Description of the Money Market as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.

Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been…


Book cover of The Evolution of Central Banks

Max Gillman Author Of The Spectre of Price Inflation

From my list on Walter Bagehot’s challenge.

Why am I passionate about this?

I remember in high school going to the gas pump and filling up during the oil crisis of the 1970s. Inflation was everywhere, but I had no idea what that was. I learned something about this in college and then in Congress as a legislative aide. I remember distinctly a conversation in Congress on how we were going to pay for these huge deficits that arose out of the Reagan tax cuts, all the while when inflation was peaking at that time. I had no idea. I then spent my PhD working in monetary economics to show the effect of inflation on the economy and have not stopped yet.

Max's book list on Walter Bagehot’s challenge

Max Gillman Why did Max love this book?

Goodhart, a former head economist of the Bank of England, builds upon Bagehot to describe how modern central banks evolved to insure the private bank system.

Goodhart argues that regulations over private banks were unnecessary and that the shadow bank system (that had evolved since the Vietnam War era inflation drove banks away from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in the US) would never go bankrupt. He argues that the investment banks always had sufficient reserves, so that increased regulation was undesirable.

The Crash of 2008 proved Goodhart wrong. Yet ironically, it is the exact same set of arguments that are being used today: banks do not need increased regulation since the Fed and Bank of England are now holding reserves, and private banks are also holding more reserves. Even the FDIC has argued against bringing investment banks into the FDIC system that is efficient, because it would involve increased…

By Charles Goodhart,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Evolution of Central Banks as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The Evolution of Central Banks employs a wide range of historical evidence and reassesses current monetary analysis to argue that the development of non-profit-maximizing and noncompetitive central banks to supervise and regulate the commercial banking system fulfils a necessary and natural function. Goodhart surveys the case for free banking, examines the key role of the clearing house in the evolution of the central bank, and investigates bank expansion and fluctuation in the context of the clearing house mechanism. He concludes that it is the noncompetitive aspect of the central bank that is crucial to the performance of its role. Goodhart…


Book cover of The End of Alchemy: Money, Banking, and the Future of the Global Economy

Max Gillman Author Of The Spectre of Price Inflation

From my list on Walter Bagehot’s challenge.

Why am I passionate about this?

I remember in high school going to the gas pump and filling up during the oil crisis of the 1970s. Inflation was everywhere, but I had no idea what that was. I learned something about this in college and then in Congress as a legislative aide. I remember distinctly a conversation in Congress on how we were going to pay for these huge deficits that arose out of the Reagan tax cuts, all the while when inflation was peaking at that time. I had no idea. I then spent my PhD working in monetary economics to show the effect of inflation on the economy and have not stopped yet.

Max's book list on Walter Bagehot’s challenge

Max Gillman Why did Max love this book?

King was the head of the Bank of England during the financial crisis of 2008. He declared full deposit insurance for the entire United Kingdom private banking system, with no deposit premiums required. This ended the run on the banks that spilled over into the streets of the UK during the crisis, when the Bank of England at first decided not to take care of Northern Rock, a private retail bank that was headed towards insolvency.

King provides a whimsical and sharp review of the private and central bank system before and after the crisis that builds very much on Charles Goodhart and Walter Bagehot. King laudably faults economists and the Economics profession for thinking that establishing negative real interest rates worldwide is the answer to central bank crises (in his newly added Introduction to the paperback edition of his 2016 hardback by the same name). Yet King sides with…

By Mervyn King,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The End of Alchemy as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Something is wrong with our banking system. We all sense that, but Mervyn King knows it firsthand; his ten years at the helm of the Bank of England, including at the height of the financial crisis, revealed profound truths about the mechanisms of our capitalist society. In The End of Alchemy he offers us an essential work about the history and future of money and banking, the keys to modern finance.

The Industrial Revolution built the foundation of our modern capitalist age. Yet the flowering of technological innovations during that dynamic period relied on the widespread adoption of two much…


Book cover of Rational Expectations and Inflation

Richard Burdekin Author Of China's Monetary Challenges: Past Experiences and Future Prospects

From my list on if you didn’t think money matters.

Why am I passionate about this?

Long before I studied economics, I remember being told in church that “money is the root of all evil.” Much later, when I was interviewing for my first professor-level position, I remember one of the interviewers saying, “I suppose everyone is interested in money.” We are not talking here about a fixation on accumulating money, but rather understanding the profound impact monetary policy has upon everyone in society. These readings show how pervasive the effects of bad monetary policy can be and how important it is to keep track of what is going on. Start with the first two chapters of Friedman’s Money Mischief and see if you can stop! 

Richard's book list on if you didn’t think money matters

Richard Burdekin Why did Richard love this book?

Sargent shows how the monetary excesses leading to inflation have often been connected to using money to cover government budgetary shortfalls. This is vividly illustrated in chapter 3 by the way that ending the post-World War I hyperinflations required fundamental fiscal as well as monetary reform. 

Sargent also convincingly demonstrates the power of expectations and the idea that, as government behavior changes, people’s behavior adjusts as well.

You really cannot argue with the Ancient Chinese proverb included on the first page: “The government has strategies. The people have counterstrategies.” Amidst the rich trove of historical cases, my favorite remains chapter 6’s interpretation of the interactions between President Ronald Reagan and a recalcitrant US Congress in the early 1980s as a “game of chicken.” 

By Thomas J. Sargent,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Rational Expectations and Inflation as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This collection of essays written by one of the founders and chief proponents of rational expectations theory is intended as a supplement for macroeconomics courses. Thomas Sargent applies rational expectations macroeconomics at an informal, non-econometric level to interpret a variety of historical and contemporary issues. Sargent uses inflation as a natural context for applying rational expectations theory. Government efforts to stop currency depreciation, alternative monetary systems and the conflict between monetary and fiscal policies are also explored.


Book cover of Inflation and Unemployment: Contributions to a New Macroeconomic Approach

Alvaro Cencini Author Of Bernard Schmitt's Quantum Macroeconomic Analysis

From my list on monetary macroeconomics.

Why am I passionate about this?

The passionate teaching of Bernard Schmitt at the University of Fribourg, Switzerland, kindled my interest in monetary macroeconomics. In Fribourg I wrote my doctoral dissertation while working as Schmitt’s research and teaching assistant. In 1978 I moved to London to conduct research at the LSE as a PhD student under the supervision of Meghnad Desai. I received my PhD in 1982. Back on the Continent, I continued my collaboration with Schmitt, which lasted until his death in 2014. My enthusiasm for research never failed and I hope to have conveyed it to some of my students at the Centre for Banking Studies in Lugano and at USI (Università della Svizzera Italiana).

Alvaro's book list on monetary macroeconomics

Alvaro Cencini Why did Alvaro love this book?

I am especially fond of this book because I edited it with a dear friend of mine, Prof. Mauro Baranzini, who, despite our different analytical backgrounds has always supported and encouraged my research in monetary macroeconomics.

The book lays the foundations for a fruitful collaboration among economists who share the same objective: to explain satisfactorily and comprehensively the disequilibria hampering the smooth development of our economies.

The works presented in this volume are a serious attempt to clarify the terms of the problem of inflation and unemployment.

They must be seen as contributions to building a modern theory of monetary and structural macroeconomics.

By Alvaro Cencini (editor), Mauro Baranzini (editor),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Inflation and Unemployment as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This work challenges traditional monetary theory by focusing on the role of banks and provides a new insight into the role played by bank money and capital accumulation. An international team of contributors reappraise analyses of the inflation and unemployment developed by Marshall, Keynes and Robertson. This volume is published in association with the Centre for the Study of Banking in Switzerland.


Book cover of A Treatise on Money: Two Volumes Complete in One

Omar F. Hamouda Author Of Money, Investment and Consumption: Keynes's Macroeconomics Rethought

From my list on theoretical reads about money, credit, and debt.

Why am I passionate about this?

 I am a reader of primary texts. One can be dismayed by the number of followers’ easy reliance on secondary literature to create interpretations of their leader’s economic ideas about the sources of society’s well-being. Distortive alteration and the recycling of unfounded ideas about conflicting influential economists’ theories is actually counterproductive. Only scrutiny of an author’s work can reveal false assertions. I’m proposing four authors I’ve scrutinised to find out what they really thought about my main teaching interests: money and credit, and their impact on prices, and the manipulation of the volume of either/both to affect purchasing power. It has been astounding to learn what theory applications, distorting their intent, bear their name.

Omar's book list on theoretical reads about money, credit, and debt

Omar F. Hamouda Why did Omar love this book?

Most economists associate volume of money with price-level (inflation/deflation), not Keynes.

For him, a macro price-level does not reveal the unsynchronized dynamics affecting the prices of its components: commodities, labor, capital, raw materials, profits; it must be decomposed.

When FunCorp invests in a rollercoaster, its decision is based on present costs and future returns (ticket sales, performance, stock options, etc.).

Windfall profits will lead to more expansion; losses, to curtailed activity. Both expansion, contingent on easy credit, or recession, on the tightening of credit, depend on bankers’ use of individuals’ savings and their creation of more deposits.

For Keynes, an institutionalised banking system is essential for a modern economy but he advocated, in the public interest, for strict rules on bankers’ abuse of credit, to mitigate the inflation/deflation rollercoaster. 

By John Maynard Keynes,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Treatise on Money as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

2011 Reprint of 1930 American Edition. Two volumes Complete in One. Full facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. Volumes One and Two of Keynes' classic work published in a handy one volume format. Exact facsimile of the original Edition. Keynes had begun a theoretical work to examine the relationship between unemployment, money and prices back in the 1920s. The work, Treatise on Money, was published in 1930 in two volumes. We reproduce this two volume edition in one volume. A central idea of the work was that if the amount of money being saved exceeds…


Book cover of The $1000 Project

Justine Crowley Author Of Saving Money Is Awesome

From my list on to save money, no matter what the economy is doing.

Why am I passionate about this?

Since engaging in my own personal development since 2006, and in buying my first investment property at the time; I have always had an interest in saving money and building wealth. We live in an abundant universe, and it is our birthright to have money to enjoy, and to achieve our goals. In high inflationary times, having ample amounts of cash in the bank is a source of comfort. Writing books also came from my passion for writing, and from also working in therapy, where many patients experienced financial difficulties. Regardless of the current rate of inflation, you can stay on top of it with the right tools and knowledge. 

Justine's book list on to save money, no matter what the economy is doing

Justine Crowley Why did Justine love this book?

This is a unique way of saving money by engaging in some extra creative activities, and thereby earning money from them outside of your normal salary/income.

For instance, this is similar to an employee or business owner having their own side hustle. Extra ways to earn money are also covered, and when you have saved in $1K parcels; then that money goes towards the relevant goal you have set for yourself.

The author uses her $1K parcels to buy shares. 

By Canna Campbell,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The $1000 Project as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

A guide to mindful saving from the financial guru behind online sensation SugarMamma.TV, The $1000 Project shows how easy it is to set yourself up for financial wellbeing.

Financial planner Canna Campbell saved $32,000 in twelve months by using her unique strategy of bundling—saving and earning extra money in small, achievable parcels of $1000. Now she wants to empower you to get the same results!

Drawing on material from her popular YouTube channel and website, here Canna shares all of her tips and tricks for saving and earning additional money, as well as advice for turning these savings into long-term…


Book cover of A Tract on Monetary Reform

Larry Allen Author Of The ABC-Clio World History Companion to Capitalism

From my list on seeing world history thru the lens of economics.

Why am I passionate about this?

I grew up listening to my grandfathers tell stories about the Great Depression (1930s). My cousins would want me to go out and play, but I wanted to stay indoors and listen to the stories. The Depression proved my grandfathers were not the best cotton farmers, but they were good storytellers, and I ended up an economics professor. Along the way, I ran across a thought from renowned British philosopher Francis Bacon: “Histories make men wise, poets, witty, mathematics, subtle;” Modern economics has gone in for subtlety, and maybe is a little too careless of wisdom. This thought sent me delving deeper into economic history, and I ended up writing five books in economics history. 

Larry's book list on seeing world history thru the lens of economics

Larry Allen Why did Larry love this book?

This book is perhaps one of the best-kept secrets in economics, overshadowed by Keynes’ more path-breaking General Theory, but oozing with wisdom on every page. Here Keynes transcends the bounds of economics. In his words: “It is one of the objects of this book to urge that the best way to cure this mortal disease of individualism is to provide there shall never exist any confident expectation either that prices are generally going to fall or that they are going to rise; and also that there shall be no serious risk that a movement, if it does occur, will be a big one.” Of course, inflation is the subject here. Its writing style alone elevates it above the commonplace. In this book, the reader finds the balance of practical judgment found in the best economists. 

By John Maynard Keynes,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked A Tract on Monetary Reform as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This book, is devoted to the need for stable currency as the essential foundation of a healthy world economy. Describing the various effects of unstable currency on investors, business people, and wage earners, Keynes recommends the implementation of policies that aim at achieving stability of the commodity value of the dollar rather than the gold value. Keynes's brilliant, clear analysis of the world monetary situation at the beginning of the twentieth century, with his many suggestions and his masterful elucidation of economic principles, stands as a vital primer for anyone interested in developing a better understanding of basic economics and…


Book cover of The Dynamic Laws of Prosperity

Justine Crowley Author Of Saving Money Is Awesome

From my list on to save money, no matter what the economy is doing.

Why am I passionate about this?

Since engaging in my own personal development since 2006, and in buying my first investment property at the time; I have always had an interest in saving money and building wealth. We live in an abundant universe, and it is our birthright to have money to enjoy, and to achieve our goals. In high inflationary times, having ample amounts of cash in the bank is a source of comfort. Writing books also came from my passion for writing, and from also working in therapy, where many patients experienced financial difficulties. Regardless of the current rate of inflation, you can stay on top of it with the right tools and knowledge. 

Justine's book list on to save money, no matter what the economy is doing

Justine Crowley Why did Justine love this book?

Everyone deserves to live an abundant life, and this book is a metaphysical way to attract more abundance in your life.

There is a strategy for everyone. Using these abundance and prosperity principles will inspire you to save more money, and to build more wealth.

This book was born from a Church Minister who wanted to help her congregation not only survive, but thrive during recessions and leaner times. 

By Catherine Ponder,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked The Dynamic Laws of Prosperity as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This book is the result of several recent recessions and many years of lean living. Nobody likes recessions and nobody likes lean living - and indeed nobody should like them. For fifteen years I tried to find such a book as this one. During those years of searching the bookshelves, I found that there are many books which give various ideas, but in none of them did I find a set of compact, simple laws for assuring success. I began searching for a book such as this after having been widowed and left with a small son to rear and…


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