The most recommended object-oriented programming books

Who picked these books? Meet our 13 experts.

13 authors created a book list connected to object-oriented programming, and here are their favorite object-oriented programming books.
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Book cover of Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software

Alexander Granin Author Of Functional Design and Architecture

From my list on domain modeling.

Who am I?

If someone had told me during my early professional years that I would become a strong advocate for functional programming and the author of a fundamental book on functional software engineering, I would have found it hard to believe. Was functional programming truly worth dedicating my life to? However, once I experienced the sheer beauty of functional programming, there was no turning back. I delved deep into Haskell and functional C++, and began writing articles, giving talks, and developing various technologies. I realized that I possessed a truly unique perspective on approaching software engineering in functional languages, and that there was a significant knowledge gap that needed to be filled for the benefit of all.

Alexander's book list on domain modeling

Alexander Granin Why did Alexander love this book?

My journey in the world of software development has been arduous and challenging.

One of the common struggles we all face is the overwhelming number of solutions available, making it impossible to fully grasp everything at a deep level.

Just when I thought I had mastered an approach and felt competent in it, a new shiny approach would emerge, demanding my immediate attention. It often felt like a never-ending race to keep up with the ever-evolving field.

This constant pursuit of staying relevant as a software engineer can be frustrating, as it feels like we are always lagging behind the rapidly advancing world. I discovered that knowledge of specific technologies, frameworks, or libraries does not easily transfer across different technology stacks. They are too specific and lack universality. It was then that I turned my focus to more general principles of software engineering.

I realized that there are fundamental engineering…

By Eric Evans,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Domain-Driven Design as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Incorporate effective domain modeling into the software development process

Software design thought leader and founder of Domain Language, Eric Evans, provides a systematic approach to domain-driven design, presenting an extensive set of design best practices, experience-based techniques, and fundamental principles that facilitate the development of software projects facing complex domains. Intertwining system design and development practice, this book incorporates numerous examples based on actual projects to illustrate the application of domain-driven design to real-world software modeling and development.

Domain Model: Part I outlines the goals of domain-driven development, defines terms, and gives an overview of the implications of using the…


Book cover of Domain-Specific Languages

Alexander Granin Author Of Functional Design and Architecture

From my list on domain modeling.

Who am I?

If someone had told me during my early professional years that I would become a strong advocate for functional programming and the author of a fundamental book on functional software engineering, I would have found it hard to believe. Was functional programming truly worth dedicating my life to? However, once I experienced the sheer beauty of functional programming, there was no turning back. I delved deep into Haskell and functional C++, and began writing articles, giving talks, and developing various technologies. I realized that I possessed a truly unique perspective on approaching software engineering in functional languages, and that there was a significant knowledge gap that needed to be filled for the benefit of all.

Alexander's book list on domain modeling

Alexander Granin Why did Alexander love this book?

It was a wonderful time when I first embarked on my programming journey.

I felt an immense sense of power over computers and had countless ideas on how programming could improve my life and the lives of others. Everything seemed within reach, and I approached the world of programming with great enthusiasm in the early 2000s.

However, reality hit me like a cold shower when I started delving into actual software development. I quickly realized that it was far more challenging than just writing code.

Each programming language and technology had its hidden complexities and treacherous pitfalls. Every domain was rife with intricate nuances that had to be understood before attempting to develop software within it. I soon discovered that there was no such thing as a "perfect solution" that could be universally applied.

As I ventured into working with real-world domains, I confronted the daunting task of addressing the…

By Martin Fowler,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Domain-Specific Languages as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

When carefully selected and used, Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) may simplify complex code, promote effective communication with customers, improve productivity, and unclog development bottlenecks. In Domain-Specific Languages, noted software development expert Martin Fowler first provides the information software professionals need to decide if and when to utilize DSLs. Then, where DSLs prove suitable, Fowler presents effective techniques for building them, and guides software engineers in choosing the right approaches for their applications.

This book's techniques may be utilized with most modern object-oriented languages; the author provides numerous examples in Java and C#, as well as selected examples in Ruby. Wherever possible,…


Book cover of Function and Reactive Domain Modeling

Alexander Granin Author Of Functional Design and Architecture

From my list on domain modeling.

Who am I?

If someone had told me during my early professional years that I would become a strong advocate for functional programming and the author of a fundamental book on functional software engineering, I would have found it hard to believe. Was functional programming truly worth dedicating my life to? However, once I experienced the sheer beauty of functional programming, there was no turning back. I delved deep into Haskell and functional C++, and began writing articles, giving talks, and developing various technologies. I realized that I possessed a truly unique perspective on approaching software engineering in functional languages, and that there was a significant knowledge gap that needed to be filled for the benefit of all.

Alexander's book list on domain modeling

Alexander Granin Why did Alexander love this book?

I'm a devoted advocate of functional programming and a passionate Haskell enthusiast.

Ironically, there was a time in my life when I was a student and held the belief that functional programming was merely an impractical academic pursuit.

However, I soon had a revelation that the techniques I employed in C++ to mitigate the inherent unsafety of the language actually aligned with the core principles of functional programming: immutability, purity, and composability.

This realization left a profound impression on me, prompting me to delve into learning Haskell. It proved to be a pivotal moment that significantly shaped my entire career trajectory.

As I delved deeper into functional programming, I discovered a significant void in terms of software engineering practices that were prevalent in the realm of object-oriented programming.

Drawing from my experiences in C++ and C#, I noticed numerous gaps in our understanding of how to build robust applications using…

By Debasish Ghosh,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Function and Reactive Domain Modeling as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Functional and Reactive Domain Modeling teaches readers how to think of the domain model in terms of pure functions and how to compose them to build larger abstractions. It begins with the basics of functional

programming and gradually progresses to the advanced concepts and patterns needed to implement complex domain models. The book demonstrates how advanced FP patterns like algebraic data types,

typeclass based design, and isolation of side-effects can make models compose for readability and verifiability.



On the subject of reactive modeling, the book focuses on higher order

concurrency patterns like actors and futures. It uses the Akka framework…


Book cover of Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code

Federico Kereki Author Of Mastering JavaScript Functional Programming: Write clean, robust, and maintainable web and server code using functional JavaScript and TypeScript

From my list on the theory and practice of computer programming.

Who am I?

I have been working with computers for decades now – having started with programmable handheld calculators and working my way up and down through mainframes, mini- and micro-computers. I always thought there is an art to writing software, and that good software can be read and admired. Maintainability, readability, and testability are some core needs for software, and after going through many programming paradigms, I feel that functional programming (FP) is the way to go – and several modern web frameworks agree. JavaScript (and now, TypeScript) are essential to web development, and I wanted to show how FP could be successfully used with those languages, and thus my book.

Federico's book list on the theory and practice of computer programming

Federico Kereki Why did Federico love this book?

This book is different from the others I recommended, because its focus is not really on creating algorithms, but rather on how to improve code with a systematic process, keeping functionality but enhancing quality.

The author shows several practical techniques that he applies to real-world problems and empower you to elevate your code's quality and adapt it seamlessly to changing needs. It's not just about writing code; it's about becoming a more effective and confident developer.

I consider this book a companion on the journey to mastering the craft of coding. With it, you’ll always be able to achieve higher-quality code, no matter the original version of the code.

By Martin Fowler,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Refactoring as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Refactoring is about improving the design of existing code. It is the process of changing a software system in such a way that it does not alter the external behavior of the code, yet improves its internal structure. With refactoring you can even take a bad design and rework it into a good one. This book offers a thorough discussion of the principles of refactoring, including where to spot opportunities for refactoring, and how to set up the required tests. There is also a catalog of more than 40 proven refactorings with details as to when and why to use…


Book cover of Smalltalk Best Practice Patterns

Philipp Fehre Author Of JavaScript Domain-Driven Design

From my list on learning from programming classics.

Who am I?

Computers have fascinated me since my childhood, having fond memories of my dad's ZX81, but even so I played around I was never truly captured by the programming until I recognized it as a way of writing rather than raw engineering. Through my studies of media sciences I found my fascination with how language can shape perception, and through my work in developer advocacy, I found how communities are shaped as well. Now I am fascinated with how different programming languages can shape thinking, having had the opportunity to solve problems at large companies in nonmainstream languages.

Philipp's book list on learning from programming classics

Philipp Fehre Why did Philipp love this book?

Smalltalk is not as common or popular as it once was, but the influence its design had on programming is hard to overstate.

Reading this book has changed how I think about object orientation, and how I design systems, learning the patterns of Smalltalk makes it clear what object oriented design is really intended to achieve.

By Kent Beck,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Smalltalk Best Practice Patterns as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This classic book is the definitive real-world style guide for better Smalltalk programming. This author presents a set of patterns that organize all the informal experience successful Smalltalk programmers have learned the hard way. When programmers understand these patterns, they can write much more effective code. The concept of Smalltalk patterns is introduced, and the book explains why they work. Next, the book introduces proven patterns for working with methods, messages, state, collections, classes and formatting. Finally, the book walks through a development example utilizing patterns. For programmers, project managers, teachers and students -- both new and experienced. This book…


Book cover of Head First C#

Jesse Liberty Author Of .NET MAUI for C# Developers: Build cross-platform mobile and desktop applications

From my list on C# programming from a C# expert.

Who am I?

I've been a C# programmer for 23 years, and am passionate about the language. It is the perfect balance of power and ease of use, and each year it is extended by its amazing development team. I've used C# to build stand-alone applications, mobile applications, APIs, and database applications and I've never felt constrained. Finally, C# lends itself to best practices and design patterns, and continues to rise in popularity, especially with professional software developers.

Jesse's book list on C# programming from a C# expert

Jesse Liberty Why did Jesse love this book?

This book brings a unique perspective to learning C#. It is fun, easy to digest, and yet comprehensive and a serious contribution to books on C#.

You may well want to make this the first book you read on the language, as it is very approachable and covers all the essentials. O'Reilly has perfected the Head First series, and this book is an exemplary addition.

By Andrew Stellman, Jennifer Greene,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Head First C# as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Finally, there's a bright alternative to the legions of dull C# tutorials. "Head First C#" gives beginning programmers a way to learn Microsoft's popular object-oriented language without boring you with a pile of dry technical material. Through its visually rich format proven to stimulate both learning and retention, this unusual book takes you through C# fundamentals and how the language works to create user interfaces, databases, and more.You can forget about memorizing. "Head First C#" is strictly hands-on. From page one, you interact with the material through plenty of graphics, games, puzzles and more. Once you get the gist of…


Book cover of Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software

Federico Kereki Author Of Mastering JavaScript Functional Programming: Write clean, robust, and maintainable web and server code using functional JavaScript and TypeScript

From my list on the theory and practice of computer programming.

Who am I?

I have been working with computers for decades now – having started with programmable handheld calculators and working my way up and down through mainframes, mini- and micro-computers. I always thought there is an art to writing software, and that good software can be read and admired. Maintainability, readability, and testability are some core needs for software, and after going through many programming paradigms, I feel that functional programming (FP) is the way to go – and several modern web frameworks agree. JavaScript (and now, TypeScript) are essential to web development, and I wanted to show how FP could be successfully used with those languages, and thus my book.

Federico's book list on the theory and practice of computer programming

Federico Kereki Why did Federico love this book?

Of all the books I recommend, this is practically a sort of personal bible, which I very frequently consult.

This book doesn't just show you how to code; with realistic patterns and real-world examples, it's like having experienced mentors guiding your every keystroke. These patterns aren't just snippets; they're blueprints for building robust, flexible software.

I think the book is practically mandatory for all developers, novice or seasoned. It transformed how I approach problems, teaching me techniques I use daily in systems design and development.

By Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson , John Vlissides

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Design Patterns as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Capturing a wealth of experience about the design of object-oriented software, four top-notch designers present a catalog of simple and succinct solutions to commonly occurring design problems. Previously undocumented, these 23 patterns allow designers to create more flexible, elegant, and ultimately reusable designs without having to rediscover the design solutions themselves.


The authors begin by describing what patterns are and how they can help you design object-oriented software. They then go on to systematically name, explain, evaluate, and catalog recurring designs in object-oriented systems. With Design Patterns as your guide, you will learn how these important patterns fit into the…


Book cover of Domain Modeling Made Functional: Tackle Software Complexity with Domain-Driven Design and F#

Enrico Buonanno Author Of Functional Programming in C#

From my list on to learn to think like a functional programmer.

Who am I?

I'm a programmer with a desire to constantly learn and improve. I have many years of experience in writing mission-critical software in highly event-driven areas such as FinTech and online auctions. Through interesting and challenging projects, I've always been fascinated by trying to generalize and abstract what it is that makes good code; so things like design patterns and best practices were just up my street. As I expanded this personal research, I found that functional programming provided many interesting techniques, but that many professionals in the industry were unaware of them. This is why I decided to show these techniques and their benefits to a wider audience through my book Functional Programming in C#.

Enrico's book list on to learn to think like a functional programmer

Enrico Buonanno Why did Enrico love this book?

Many functional programming books concentrate on the detail of functional techniques (things like recursion or higher-order functions), often leaving open the gap between these techniques and their concrete application to solve everyday programming tasks.

This was one of the reasons I wrote my book, and one source of inspiration for me was the work of F# evangelist Scott Wlashin.

For many years, Scott has been showing how he applies functional thinking in his daily practice centered around e-commerce, through blog posts on his popular site and his talks at programming conferences. At popular request, he's organized these ideas into his book Domain Modelling Made Functional.

The examples are practical enough that every business application programmer will be able to relate to them, and his explanation of functional programming techniques and ideas is clear and rigorous. Although Scott encourages the adoption of F# (the functional-first language of the .NET family), these…

By Scott Wlaschin,

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked Domain Modeling Made Functional as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

You want increased customer satisfaction, faster development cycles, and less wasted work. Domain-driven design (DDD) combined with functional programming is the innovative combo that will get you there. In this pragmatic, down-to-earth guide, you'll see how applying the core principles of functional programming can result in software designs that model real-world requirements both elegantly and concisely - often more so than an object-oriented approach. Practical examples in the open-source F# functional language, and examples from familiar business domains, show you how to apply these techniques to build software that is business-focused, flexible, and high quality. Domain-driven design is a well-established…


Book cover of Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture

Paolo Perrotta Author Of Programming Machine Learning: From Coding to Deep Learning

From my list on classic software that are still worth reading.

Who am I?

You know what ages like milk? Programming books. I always cringe when someone glances at my programming bookshelf. Some of those books are so dated, they make me appear out of touch by association. Sometimes, I feel compelled to justify myself. “Yes, that's the first edition of Thinking in Java I keep it for nostalgic reasons, you know!” Yesterday’s software book is today’s fish and chip wrapper. However, there are exceptions. A few classics stay relevant for years, or even decades. This is a shortlist of software books that might be older than you, but are still very much worth reading.

Paolo's book list on classic software that are still worth reading

Paolo Perrotta Why did Paolo love this book?

If one author influenced my way of thinking about software, that’s Martin Fowler. From planning to architectures, his insights are embedded in every line of code I write. I was certain that one of his books would make my list.

But which one? Let’s face it–many of Fowler's books feel dated today. Not because his ideas became obsolete, but because they're now taken for granted. Who needs to re-read a book like Refactoring, when we all have a refactoring menu at our fingertips?

So I settled on this book. It’s a catalog of patterns, but one of the best. And don’t be misled by the word “enterprise” in the title: even lightweight patterns such as Active Record were popularized by this book.

Whether or not you work in a large company, this is still an essential collection of knowledge, written in Fowler’s signature clean style.

By Martin Fowler,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

The practice of enterprise application development has benefited from the emergence of many new enabling technologies. Multi-tiered object-oriented platforms, such as Java and .NET, have become commonplace. These new tools and technologies are capable of building powerful applications, but they are not easily implemented. Common failures in enterprise applications often occur because their developers do not understand the architectural lessons that experienced object developers have learned.

Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture is written in direct response to the stiff challenges that face enterprise application developers. The author, noted object-oriented designer Martin Fowler, noticed that despite changes in technology--from Smalltalk to…


Book cover of Head First Git: A Learner's Guide to Understanding Git from the Inside Out

Jeanne Boyarsky Author Of OCP Oracle Certified Professional Java SE 17 Developer Study Guide: Exam 1Z0-829

From my list on becoming a better Java developer.

Who am I?

I’ve always enjoyed mentoring folks whether new or experienced in programming. Whether it is teaching an intern or a high school robotics student, or onboarding an experienced Java developer, it brings me joy to see people learn. I also love to read. Being able to recommend some of my favorite books can help even more people absorb all of this information.

Jeanne's book list on becoming a better Java developer

Jeanne Boyarsky Why did Jeanne love this book?

Head First books are always fun. They know how to engage your brain and have cartoons/puzzles.

I recommend this book whether you are first learning git or have used it for some time. Understanding git is a big deal so you can work efficiently. Without having to keep deleting the repository and starting over!

By Raju Ghandi,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Head First Git as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

What will you learn from this book?

Many people who use Git rely on "recipes"--copying and pasting commands they find on the internet without really understanding how Git actually works. But what do you do if you find yourself in a tight spot? You can't simply wing it. With this unique hands-on guide, you'll learn the ways of Git and have fun while doing it. Raju Gandhi peels back the layers to reveal the simple yet powerful engine that powers Git, so you'll understand not just the how but the why. You'll master branches, merges, commit messages, search, utilities, and…