The best books about Indira Gandhi 📚

Browse the best books on Indira Gandhi as recommended by authors, experts, and creators. Along with notes on why they recommend those books.

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Book cover of Karma

Karma

By Cathy Ostlere

Why this book?

In 1984, a 15-year old Indo-Canadian Maya travels with her father to India to consign her mother's ashes to the Ganges. Prime Minister Indira Gandhi is assassinated the very day they arrive and Delhi descends into state-sponsored carnage as Sikh men and women are held collectively responsible. Separated from her father, Maya has to find her way home. This novel in verse is by Canadian writing across ethnic and religious lines. As a Sikh, I am familiar with details of the pogrom. Instead of applying the usual Western label of “senseless violence” Ostlere sensitively explores the impact on two ordinary…

From the list:

The best books by writers breaking cross-cultural boundaries

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Book cover of India After Gandhi: The History of the World's Largest Democracy

India After Gandhi: The History of the World's Largest Democracy

By Ramachandra Guha

Why this book?

India is an enigma to many people – a developing country beset with a number of problems yet a resounding democracy; a nuclear and space power yet grappling with poverty, malnutrition, and illiteracy; a source of great talent for global corporations and a nation of innovators yet experiencing violence and acrimony based on caste and religion. India After Gandhi is a comprehensive guide to understand these apparent contradictions and make sense of modern India. It is history told in an accessible, evidence-based fashion, and free from biases.

From the list:

The best books on the history of modern India

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Book cover of Warrior Queens: The Legends and the Lives of the Women Who Have Led Their Nations to War

Warrior Queens: The Legends and the Lives of the Women Who Have Led Their Nations to War

By Antonia Fraser

Why this book?

In many ways, Antonia Fraser's Warrior Queens spurred my long-term interest in women warriors. Fraser not only introduced me to historical women I had never heard of, but to the idea that women had fought as a normal part of the army in far more epochs and far more civilizations than is normally appreciated. Fraser looks at her warring queens as a group as well as individually, trying to understand the tropes that (mostly male) historians have used both to make them bigger than life and to demean them as women. A fascinating read that has held up well over…

From the list:

The best books about women in war

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Book cover of Such a Long Journey

Such a Long Journey

By Rohinton Mistry

Why this book?

As an author from Nepal, I have learned the most from Rohinton Mistry than any other South Asian writer about how to “translate” the landscape and language of my country for an international audience. Such a Long Journey was the first novel that taught me how to integrate the social and political seamlessly into the psychological makeup of my protagonist—in an English that is uniquely local. In the novel, Gustad Noble, a devoted family man, gets snared into the deception and corruption of the government under Indira Gandhi. It’s a riveting read, and Mistry is superb with vivid descriptions. That…

From the list:

The best fiction books that make the political feel intensely personal

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