4 books like The Maxwellians

By Bruce J. Hunt,

Here are 4 books that authors have personally recommended if you like The Maxwellians. Shepherd is a community of 7,000+ authors sharing their favorite books with the world.

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Men of Mathematics

By E.T. Bell,

Book cover of Men of Mathematics

First published in 1937, this lovely book is a true classic. In two volumes Bell brings to life 30 or so mathematicians, from Archimedes to Cantor. When first reading the book many years ago I had remembered some of the names from school and college, but only as labels to theorems or equations, and I felt taken into a delightful new realm of knowledge – I could now think of Fermat, Lagrange, Gauss, and Riemann as people. And I began to want to know more about the scientists whose names I had heard in school and college. Bell’s book had sparked a lifelong interest.

Men of Mathematics

By E.T. Bell,

Why should I read it?

3 authors picked Men of Mathematics as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Synopsis coming soon.......


QED

By Richard P. Feynman,

Book cover of QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter

My second pick is by the master himself. Richard Feynman’s little book explains quantum electrodynamics or QED to a lay audience. Not only did he receive a Nobel Prize for his discoveries in this area, but Feynman was at the pinnacle of using deep understanding of physics to give the simplest possible yet accurate description of the world as seen through physics. He steps the reader slowly and carefully through some incredible journeys of logic (without equations) to explain how light travels from one place to another and how light interacts with matter such as electrons. It’s basic stuff, but deep and a fun ride. 

QED

By Richard P. Feynman,

Why should I read it?

3 authors picked QED as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Celebrated for his brilliantly quirky insights into the physical world, Nobel laureate Richard Feynman also possessed an extraordinary talent for explaining difficult concepts to the general public. Here Feynman provides a classic and definitive introduction to QED (namely, quantum electrodynamics), that part of quantum field theory describing the interactions of light with charged particles. Using everyday language, spatial concepts, visualizations, and his renowned "Feynman diagrams" instead of advanced mathematics, Feynman clearly and humorously communicates both the substance and spirit of QED to the layperson. A. Zee's introduction places Feynman's book and his seminal contribution to QED in historical context and…


Theoretical Concepts in Physics

By Malcolm S. Longair,

Book cover of Theoretical Concepts in Physics: An Alternative View of Theoretical Reasoning in Physics

Malcolm Longair’s book is like a course of very good lectures that get behind the equations to reveal the context of their discovery. For example, we learn how Planck, who hated Boltzmann’s statistical approach to the theory of heat, was obliged to adopt it in order to solve the problem of black body radiation, and how this led to the concept of the quantum. There are plenty of equations but each chapter tells a compelling story of people at work, and the presentation all the way through is beautifully clear, with superb illustrations.

Theoretical Concepts in Physics

By Malcolm S. Longair,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Theoretical Concepts in Physics as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In this original and integrated approach to theoretical reasoning in physics, Malcolm Longair illuminates the subject from the perspective of real physics as practised by research scientists. Concentrating on the basic insights, attitudes and techniques that are the tools of the modern physicist, this approach conveys the intellectual excitement and beauty of the subject. Through a series of seven case studies, an undergraduate course in classical physics and the discovery of quanta are reviewed from the point of the view of how the great discoveries and changes of perspective came about. This approach illuminates the intellectual struggles needed to attain…


The Cosmic Computer

By Gareth Timms,

Book cover of The Cosmic Computer: The Physics of the Perennial Philosophy

Self-published on Amazon, this book is a blast of fresh air. Bold, deep, and engagingly written, it takes an axe to received wisdom in physics. In Timms’ hypothesis, the universe we perceive is one half of a duality, its partner existing deep within atoms and inaccessible to us because of the huge amounts of energy required to probe such small scales. The partners communicate at the atomic scale, where the quantum of action becomes the currency unit of exchange. Timms makes his case elegantly and plausibly, using many quotes from authoritative sources. You may not agree with some of his propositions but it is stimulating, and enjoyable, to have one’s ideas given a good shake-up.

The Cosmic Computer

By Gareth Timms,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Cosmic Computer as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

This book explores the ultimate information technology of the Cosmic Computer, and how it supports the Perennial Philosophy, the core consensus of all spiritual and mystic experience. Evidence is presented for a dual representation of information at large and small scales in the Universe. This simple idea not only allows science to be reconciled with spirit, but can also make sense of quantum mechanics and other mysteries of physics, and suggest new lines of research. The Cosmic Computer is an update of David Bohm's holistic interpretation of quantum mechanics for the information age. Numerous quotations from physicists and spiritual masters…


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