27 books directly related to wealth 📚

All 27 wealth books as recommended by authors and experts. Updated weekly.

Think and Grow Rich

By Napoleon Hill,

Book cover of Think and Grow Rich

Why this book?

After reading this book, I realized that I was actually repelling wealth. In order to transform your reality, you need to reprogram your subconscious mind. What you think becomes reality. The author teaches specific principles but it is up to the reader to apply them. You’ll need to write daily goals and affirm them aloud daily. My copy is full of highlights, notes, and annotations. There are too many nuggets of wisdom to mention. If you want to attract abundance in your life, this is the first book you need to read!


The Captured Economy: How the Powerful Enrich Themselves, Slow Down Growth, and Increase Inequality

By Steven M. Teles, Brink Lindsey,

Book cover of The Captured Economy: How the Powerful Enrich Themselves, Slow Down Growth, and Increase Inequality

Why this book?

This is a good book to understand the pervasive existence of “rents” in the economy. From the literal rents that homeowners in popular areas can charge, to the rents that accrue to copyright or patent holders, to the rents earned by firms using regulation to block competition, the authors document all the places in our economy where this restricts innovation. It is ultimately a book asking “what is fair?”.


The Science of Getting Rich: The Proven Mental Program to a Life of Wealth

By Wallace D. Wattles,

Book cover of The Science of Getting Rich: The Proven Mental Program to a Life of Wealth

Why this book?

The very first sentence of this book made me slam it shut and leave it untouched for years. It reads: “Whatever may be said in praise of poverty, the fact remains that it is not possible to live a really complete or successful life unless one is rich.” Hello? How gross is that?! It offended me to my hippie core, until I understood what it was really saying and that, erm, you kind of can’t —not if you want to fully express yourself, anyway. “Rich” simply means that you have everything you need to share your gifts fully with the world and stay at the highest vibration while you do it, whatever that looks like for you. This is now easily the book I recommend to people the most, and the one I read over and over. But you have to let a lot go because it will absolutely go up your nose if you’re still working on your issues around it being OK to make money.


How to Get Rich: One of the World's Greatest Entrepreneurs Shares His Secrets

By Felix Dennis,

Book cover of How to Get Rich: One of the World's Greatest Entrepreneurs Shares His Secrets

Why this book?

The title is a trick, probably the publisher's idea. Dennis (who passed away in 2014) expresses qualms about the whole getting rich idea. Before becoming a magazine multimillionaire (The Week, Maxim, Stuff) he was a poet, jailed in 1971 for editing an obscene humor magazine. He borrowed to start his publishing empire with Cozmic Comics and Kung Fu Monthly. He writes that anyone can raise capital -- you just need enough confidence in your plan to grovel and risk your friends' money. I forever carry his advice on negotiation: whoever cares less wins. Negotiate hard, be sure about what you'd like, but be ready to walk away, because no deal is a must-do.


The Psychology of Money: Timeless Lessons on Wealth, Greed, and Happiness

By Morgan Housel,

Book cover of The Psychology of Money: Timeless Lessons on Wealth, Greed, and Happiness

Why this book?

How a book about money is so interesting is beyond me (I assume it has something to do with the author truly understanding, ahem, psychology). But this one is getting rave reviews for good reason. It’s almost addictive to read. Using nineteen short stories, it explores how historical figures navigated wealth, shows you why it was either a winning or losing strategy, and helps you apply to see the relevance to your own financial situation. This book will suck you in and make you realize that a lot of your own financial decisions shouldn’t be made on paper-only. 


Quit Like a Millionaire: No Gimmicks, Luck, or Trust Fund Required

By Kristy Shen, Bryce Leung,

Book cover of Quit Like a Millionaire: No Gimmicks, Luck, or Trust Fund Required

Why this book?

A page-turner about personal finance? This one comes close! Humor is a key ingredient throughout, along with an approachable, off-the-cuff writing style. The chapter on retiring early with kids does a superb job of overturning myths by telling the stories of parents who have actually achieved it. The advice on "Don't Follow Your Passion (Yet)" is spot-on, as is their fun-to-read revelation that traveling the world can actually be cheaper than staying at home.


Cities and the Wealth of Nations: Principles of Economic Life

By Jane Jacobs,

Book cover of Cities and the Wealth of Nations: Principles of Economic Life

Why this book?

I was introduced to Jane Jacobs as required reading during graduate school. I’m convinced that most urban planners who claim to adore Jacobs have not actually read her, particularly Cities and the Wealth of Nations, which is my favorite. Its thoroughly brutal logic stands in contrast to nearly everything we still do to manage our cities. Jacobs is an insightful genius.


30 Days to Taming Your Finances

By Deborah Smith Pegues,

Book cover of 30 Days to Taming Your Finances

Why this book?

Ms. Pegue is a speaker and television host on TBN. She made a splash in 2005 with her book, 30 Days to Taming Your Tongue, which she then capitalized on by publishing a 30 Day Series. Taming Your Finances was second in the series.

Although some of Ms. Pegues’s other books are outwardly Christian, this one is not.

Ms. Pegue has no children, which will compromise her credibility with readers who have children. With eight children, no debt, and two paid-off mortgages on a single-income pastor’s salary, I believe I’ll have the credibility they desire. 

Ms. Pegue was the CFO of West Angeles Church of God in Christ when it took on a $35 million loan to construct their building, which was the largest loan ever given to a religious institution.

The book is also fairly short at only 140 pages.


Money, Possessions and Eternity

By Randy Alcorn,

Book cover of Money, Possessions and Eternity

Why this book?

Mr. Alcorn’s book provides an eternal view of our temporary wealth and possessions. The primary focus, spread over the course of the book, can be boiled down to one point: the heavenly perspective we should have will help us be good earthly stewards.

In Mr. Alcorn’s own words, the book is “thoroughly researched…a biblical comprehensive view,” and it should be at over 500 pages! He strives to cover every conceivable topic related to money, such as investing, retirement, gambling, inheritances, giving, and the list goes on. 

Is there such a thing as too much of a good thing? As one review who provided a one-star review said, “In the interests of full disclosure I have only read halfway through this book.” Mark Twain famously said, “I didn’t have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one.”


The Law of Divine Compensation: On Work, Money, and Miracles

By Marianne Williamson,

Book cover of The Law of Divine Compensation: On Work, Money, and Miracles

Why this book?

A beautifully written book on the spiritual side of wealth, money, and profit by the ever-stellar Marianne Williamson. She is one of my faves. I demand you see her speak if you ever get the chance.


Holistic Wealth: 32 Life Lessons to Help You Find Purpose, Prosperity, and Happiness

By Keisha Blair,

Book cover of Holistic Wealth: 32 Life Lessons to Help You Find Purpose, Prosperity, and Happiness

Why this book?

We are all going to lose someone we love. We are all going to go through the pain of people we care about dying. We are all going to contemplate our mortality at some point and wonder if what we’re doing has much of a point, if we could do better, and if we could make life a little less painful somehow.

Keisha Blair lost her husband when they were both in their thirties, when their son was 8 weeks old. She shares what she learned about building from that wreckage in Holistic Wealth. The book puts the pain of loss front and center, and then offers insights from stories and interviews on how to take care of our money, our relationships, and our spirituality, and thus ourselves.


The Color of Money: Black Banks and the Racial Wealth Gap

By Mehrsa Baradaran,

Book cover of The Color of Money: Black Banks and the Racial Wealth Gap

Why this book?

While researching my book, I saw how some residents in poor Black neighborhoods protected and revered monied drug dealers who gave back to their communities. Baradaran’s The Color of Money explains the stark racial wealth gap behind this dynamic. I learned, for example, about the Freedman’s Bank, created to help newly freed slaves build wealth. While White bankers exhorted Black people to limit their spending to build savings, these same bankers made risky railroad and real estate investments. These investments ultimately spelled the demise of the bank – and of the hard-earned savings of its Black customers. And White bankers’ poor decisions sowed Black distrust of financial institutions for generations to come. 


We Were Liars

By E. Lockhart,

Book cover of We Were Liars

Why this book?

OK, I admit, I’m cheating a little with this one because the plot doesn’t technically mess with time, but the storytelling itself does since the narrator is remembering events that happened in the past. This is one of those Big Ending Plot Twist stories so I can’t say too much, but the thing that happened in the past has everything to do with the present in a way that completely blew me away. Wildly clever plotting (something I find super hard to do well). I loved this book. 


Pictures of a Gone City: Tech and the Dark Side of Prosperity in the San Francisco Bay Area

By Richard A. Walker,

Book cover of Pictures of a Gone City: Tech and the Dark Side of Prosperity in the San Francisco Bay Area

Why this book?

Debunking the Horatio Alger promotional blather of self-flattering tech moguls, the real Bay Area comes into view, based on nurses and teachers, drivers and clerks, homeless and the desperate. Real estate bubbles have given way to tech bubbles which have given way to housing bubbles and now have given way to a chimerical prosperity that is as fragile as any of the prior ones. Dick Walker pierces the veils of capitalist self-promotion to reveal the bleak consequences of the “technology booms” that have repeatedly crashed over the San Francisco Bay Area. Whether unpacking the real causes of our ongoing housing crisis or detailing the extensive ecological havoc inflicted on our area, this is a recent, definitive, fact-based analysis of it all.


God and Money: How We Discovered True Riches at Harvard Business School

By Gregory Baumer,

Book cover of God and Money: How We Discovered True Riches at Harvard Business School

Why this book?

God and Money is primarily a guide to giving, but secondarily it is a testimony of how the authors were attending Harvard and became convicted about their extravagant lifestyles and the need to give more. The book largely discusses the different approaches to act on this burden. 

While God and Money focuses on giving, they followed up with True Riches which uses a “putting off and putting on” type of approach: pride to gratitude, coveting to content, anxiety to trust, indifference to love are the chapter topics. At around 100 pages, the book is limited in scope and repeats some of the material (such as the testimonies and approaches) from the previous book.

The biggest drawback for these authors is they haven’t built platforms. Neither have author profiles on sites, such as Goodreads and BookBub. Only one has an Amazon profile. The website, God and Money, is limited with no blog or listed speaking engagements since 2016.


Prosperity Without Growth: Foundations for the Economy of Tomorrow

By Tim Jackson,

Book cover of Prosperity Without Growth: Foundations for the Economy of Tomorrow

Why this book?

Upon seeing me carrying this book around, a friend of mine looked at me curiously and asked why we wouldn’t want growth and instead want prosperity. I realized she had misinterpreted this book’s title. The author isn’t referring to personal growth (which is, of course, good) but to economic growth and the assumption that bigger economic numbers (GDP) are better. The idea may get a bit geeky, but economic growth tends to not emphasize the things that are important (the unpaid tasks of taking care of elderly parents, for instance) but count the money spent on things that we’d rather not have more of, for example, prisons and war. What we want to measure and encourage are the things that truly make us better people and better societies. Happily, those things also tend to not be as environmentally bad.


The Wealth and Poverty of Nations: Why Some Are So Rich and Some So Poor

By David S. Landes,

Book cover of The Wealth and Poverty of Nations: Why Some Are So Rich and Some So Poor

Why this book?

Why do some economies prosper while others seem never to make progress? Landes’s book – with its title a deliberate echo of Adam Smith’s famous work – emphasizes the role of culture in either enabling or retarding productive economic activity, throughout history and across the world. What Landes has in mind is culture in the broadest sense, including our most fundamental presumptions about human relations and the human condition. That, of course, means religion too. Some years ago, reviewing someone else’s book for The New York Times, I referred to David Landes as “a living national treasure if there ever was one.” Alas, Landes is no longer living, but I stand by that assessment.


Wealth Explosion: The Nature and Origins of Modernity

By Stephen Davies,

Book cover of Wealth Explosion: The Nature and Origins of Modernity

Why this book?

The great fact of economic history is that we all used to be poor, and now most of us are not. 200 years ago, almost 90 percent of the world’s population lived in extreme poverty, today around 9 percent does. This is the story of that remarkable transformation and what made it possible. Of course, there are many good books on this, and I have greatly enjoyed for example Joel Mokyr, Deirdre McCloskey, and David Landes, but this is a powerful, short book by a great historian, that manages to weave together economic, political, technological and intellectual factors into a very compelling narrative of progress and its preconditions over the past one thousand years.


Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger: Moving from Affluence to Generosity

By Ronald J. Sider,

Book cover of Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger: Moving from Affluence to Generosity

Why this book?

This was another foundational book for the network I created, PreachersNSneakers, and seemed to validate some of the questions I already had about Christianity. This book is packed with statistics and other realities about how much poverty and suffering there is in the world compared to the small subset of Western Christians that live with relative wealth. This book helps wrestle with the idea that a few get to flourish while masses live in poverty and how we as Christians should live our lives knowing that fact. This book is challenging in the best way and is a must-read for those who have questions about the relationship between faith and money.


Voyage from Yesteryear

By James P. Hogan,

Book cover of Voyage from Yesteryear

Why this book?

One of my philosophy professors said science fiction writers were the new philosophers. I couldn’t agree more. Science fiction authors can create worlds to test hypotheses about social structures. Hogan creates a world seeded with humans with the goal of finding a planet they can move to before the impending self-inflicted destruction of Earth. Without the connection to Earth, the society that forms is a highly productive world without an exchangeable currency. The robots that brought the ship to the planet can build everything they need. After generations, Earthlings make their way to the planet, bringing the ideas and philosophies that destroyed Earth. The locals welcome them and are amused at the absurd ideas. This book does a wonderful job exploring concepts of wealth, social structure, and so much more. 


Evil Geniuses: The Unmaking of America: A Recent History

By Kurt Andersen,

Book cover of Evil Geniuses: The Unmaking of America: A Recent History

Why this book?

In his characteristically funny and sardonic style, Andersen guides us through the historical connection between corporate America and the Republican Party. Needless to say, the relationship has been strong and fruitful (Democrats are guilty as well, but it’s hardly a comparison). He reports on the key conservative figures in both the private and public spheres who have funded and enabled the transformation of our laws and society. It is a remarkable story of power and greed written in concise witty prose. Highly recommend!


The Summer of Lost Letters

By Hannah Reynolds,

Book cover of The Summer of Lost Letters

Why this book?

I am a sucker for contemporary romances with a hint of historical sprinkled in, so when I saw that The Summer of Lost Letters took place on Nantucket (gorgeous), and followed a modern teenage girl whose late grandmother’s love letters to a man other than her grandfather mysteriously show up on her front steps, I knew it was for me. Romance, mystery, and family secrets combine for a compelling summer read!


The Millionaire Mind

By Thomas J. Stanley,

Book cover of The Millionaire Mind

Why this book?

Millionaires are good at spotting opportunities that others do not see, finding a profitable niche, specializing, and thoroughly enjoying their careers or businesses. Curiously, they also have a knack for investing, be it investing in the equities of public corporations, making wise investments, and being willing to take financial risks given the right return. Perhaps most vital: they are willing to live below their means.

On the pathway to success, most millionaires regard becoming wealthy as the product of key elements. One is social skills: getting along with people, having strong leadership qualities, benefitting from good mentors, and having an ability to sell ideas and products. Also, being honest with all people, having a supportive spouse, and for many, maintaining a strong religious faith.

Other key elements are ignoring the criticism of detractors while maintaining a competitive spirit or personality, wanting to be well-respected, possessing extraordinary energy, and even being physically fit.

Are such people lucky? Generally they tend to be well-disciplined and well organized, which leads to ‘luck.’ And they are willing to work harder than most people!


Timeless

By Alexandra Monir,

Book cover of Timeless

Why this book?

Yet another book I chose based on the cover. I dove into this book knowing that I would love the storyline since I adore all things time travel. Timeless is very descriptive and history based, which pulled me in right away. I will say I didn’t love our main character from the beginning, but as I got to know her I understood her quirks. In this book, we are tossed between the current time and 1910, my favorite era. Michele, our main character, is having dreams about a man with blue eyes and a skeleton key, which is all revealed later in the book. The writing is flawless and the romance is sweet, which puts this book more in the young adult category. I myself prefer YA books, and I do not apologize for it.

I ended up reading the series and really enjoyed the progression.


The Price of Privilege: How Parental Pressure and Material Advantage Are Creating a Generation of Disconnected and Unhappy Kids

By Madeline Levine,

Book cover of The Price of Privilege: How Parental Pressure and Material Advantage Are Creating a Generation of Disconnected and Unhappy Kids

Why this book?

Over and over I urge my clients to read this book before they think they need to…even if they’re not “privileged.” In it we learn the real-life effects of over-privilege, of giving our kids too much, and more, of not expecting enough from them. Learning the critical connections between the choices we make for our kids and their emotional development certainly helps any parent to be the parent she hoped to be.


Capital: The Eruption of Delhi

By Rana Dasgupta,

Book cover of Capital: The Eruption of Delhi

Why this book?

It reads like a great novel but is a great work of non-fiction. The subject is India’s capital as it undergoes massive change and growing polarization. The book gets under the surface of change to reveal some of its costs and consequences. The book is a great blend of reportage, political critique, and sympathetic accounts of the varied citizenry, from the very wealthy to the very poor. A fascinating and empathetic account of rapid change in one of the city's largest cities in one of the world's most populous countries as it both fashions and is impacted by globalization. 


The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America's Wealthy

By Thomas J. Stanley, William D. Danko,

Book cover of The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America's Wealthy

Why this book?

This book offers a good reminder that appearances can be deceiving. Those who flaunt their luxurious lifestyles may actually be deep in debt, while those frugal souls who live next door may actually be quite wealthy. Since we ourselves like to wear blue jeans and sport cheap Casio watches, this book’s message appealed to us on a visceral level. It’s not so much a how-to manual on retiring early as it is a guide to the seven traits that tend to be shared by wealthy individuals.